lyric


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Related to lyric: lyric poem

lyr·ic

 (lĭr′ĭk)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to a category of poetry that expresses subjective thoughts and feelings, often in a songlike style or form.
b. Relating to or constituting a poem in this category, such as a sonnet or ode.
c. Of or relating to a writer of poems in this category.
2. Lyrical.
3. Music
a. Having a singing voice of light volume and modest range.
b. Of, relating to, or being musical drama, especially opera: the lyric stage.
c. Having a pleasing succession of sounds; melodious.
d. Of or relating to the lyre or harp.
e. Appropriate for accompaniment by the lyre.
n.
1. A lyric poem.
2. often lyrics Music The words of a song.

[French lyrique, of a lyre, from Old French, from Latin lyricus, from Greek lurikos, from lura, lyre.]

lyric

(ˈlɪrɪk)
adj
1. (Poetry) expressing the writer's personal feelings and thoughts
2. (Music, other) having the form and manner of a song
3. (Poetry) of or relating to such poetry
4. (Music, other) (of music) having songlike qualities
5. (Music, other) (of a singing voice) having a light quality and tone
6. (Music, other) intended for singing, esp (in classical Greece) to the accompaniment of the lyre
n
7. (Poetry) a short poem of songlike quality
8. (Pop Music) (plural) the words of a popular song
Also (for senses 1–4): lyrical
[C16: from Latin lyricus, from Greek lurikos, from lura lyre]
ˈlyrically adv
ˈlyricalness n

lyr•ic

(ˈlɪr ɪk)

adj. Also, lyr′i•cal.
1. (of a poem) having the form and general effect of a song, esp. one expressing the writer's feelings.
2. pertaining to or writing lyric poetry.
3. characterized by or expressing strong, spontaneous feeling: lyric writing.
4. pertaining to, rendered by, or employing singing.
5. (of a voice) relatively light of volume and modest in range: a lyric soprano.
6. pertaining, adapted, or sung to the lyre, or composing poems to be sung to the lyre.
n.
7. a lyric poem.
8. Usu., lyrics. the words of a song.
[1575–85; < Latin lyricus < Greek lyrikós]
lyr′i•cal•ly, adv.
lyr′i•cal•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lyric - the text of a popular song or musical-comedy number; "his compositions always started with the lyrics"; "he wrote both words and music"; "the song uses colloquial language"
text, textual matter - the words of something written; "there were more than a thousand words of text"; "they handed out the printed text of the mayor's speech"; "he wants to reconstruct the original text"
song, vocal - a short musical composition with words; "a successful musical must have at least three good songs"
love lyric - the lyric of a love song
2.lyric - a short poem of songlike quality
poem, verse form - a composition written in metrical feet forming rhythmical lines
ode - a lyric poem with complex stanza forms
strophe - one section of a lyric poem or choral ode in classical Greek drama
antistrophe - the section of a choral ode answering a previous strophe in classical Greek drama; the second of two metrically corresponding sections in a poem
Verb1.lyric - write lyrics for (a song)
poesy, poetry, verse - literature in metrical form
indite, pen, write, compose - produce a literary work; "She composed a poem"; "He wrote four novels"
relyric - write new lyrics for (a song)
Adj.1.lyric - expressing deep emotion; "the dancer's lyrical performance"
emotional - of more than usual emotion; "his behavior was highly emotional"
2.lyric - used of a singer or singing voice that is light in volume and modest in range; "a lyric soprano"
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
dramatic - used of a singer or singing voice that is marked by power and expressiveness and a histrionic or theatrical style; "a dramatic tenor"; "a dramatic soprano"
3.lyric - relating to or being musical drama; "the lyric stage"
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
4.lyric - of or relating to a category of poetry that expresses emotion (often in a songlike way); "lyric poetry"
poesy, poetry, verse - literature in metrical form

lyric

adjective
1. (of poetry) songlike, musical, lyrical, expressive, melodic His splendid short stories and lyric poetry.
2. (of a voice) melodic, clear, clear, light, flowing, graceful, mellifluous, dulcet her fresh, beautiful, lyric voice
plural noun
1. words, lines, text, libretto, words of a song an opera with lyrics by Langston Hughes

lyric

adjective
Of, relating to, or having the characteristics of poetry:
Translations
قصيدَه غنائيَّه عاطِفِيَّهكَلِمات الأغْنِيَه
lyrickýlyrikatext
lyriklyrisktekstvers
dalszöveglírailírai költemény
lÿrík, lÿrískt ljóîlÿrískursöngtexti
lyrinislyrinis eilėraštislyriškasžodžiai
dziesmas vārdiliriskslirisks dzejolis
lyrickýlyrika

lyric

[ˈlɪrɪk]
A. ADJlírico
B. N (= poem) → poema m lírico; (= genre) → lírica f lyrics (= words of song) → letra fsing

lyric

[ˈlɪrɪk]
adjlyrique
lyrics npl [song, musical] → paroles fpl

lyric

adjlyrisch
n (= poem)lyrisches Gedicht; (= genre)Lyrik f; (= often pl: words of pop song)Text m

lyric

[ˈlɪrɪk]
1. adjlirico/a
2. n (poem) → lirica lyrics npl (words of song) → parole fpl

lyric

(ˈlirik) adjective
(of poetry) expressing the poet's personal feeling.
noun
1. a lyric poem.
2. (in plural) the words of a song. The tune is good, but I don't like the lyrics.
References in classic literature ?
The memorandum-book begins with the well-known words saying that `the management of the Opera shall give to the performance of the National Academy of Music the splendor that becomes the first lyric stage in France' and ends with Clause 98, which says that the privilege can be withdrawn if the manager infringes the conditions stipulated in the memorandum-book.
Suppose a young lady has just been warbling ('with a grating and uncertain sound') Shelley's exquisite lyric 'I arise from dreams of thee': how much nicer it would be, instead of your having to say "Oh, thank you, thank you
Milton says that the lyric poet may drink wine and live generously, but the epic poet, he who shall sing of the gods and their descent unto men, must drink water out of a wooden bowl.
He was roused from his almost lyric ecstacy, by a big double Saint-Jean cracker, which suddenly went off from the happy cabin.
Hilbery, who had a very sweet voice, trolled out a famous lyric of her father's which had been set to an absurdly and charmingly sentimental air by some early Victorian composer.
Reveal not only an imagination of intense fire and heat, but an almost finished art--a power of conceiving subtle mental complexities with clearness and of expressing them in a picturesque form and in perfect lyric language.
There thou shalt hear and learn the secret power Of harmony, in tones and numbers hit By voice or hand, and various-measured verse, AEolian charms and Dorian lyric odes, And his who gave them breath, but higher sung, Blind Melesigenes, thence Homer called, Whose poem Phoebus challenged for his own.
And it was, as I remember it, a most exquisite night--a white poem, a frosty, starry lyric of light.
There, among strangers, she was to be perfected in the actress's and the singer's art; then to return to England, and make the fortune of her family on the lyric stage.
Anne heard it and thrilled to it; Gilbert heard it, and wondered only that all the birds in the world had not burst into jubilant song; Paul heard it and later wrote a lyric about it which was one of the most admired in his first volume of verse; Charlotta the Fourth heard it and was blissfully sure it meant good luck for her adored Miss Shirley.
Exposition (as in most essays) cannot as a rule be permeated with so much emotion as narration or, certainly, as lyric poetry.
Something of this kind, I replied:--God is always to be represented as he truly is, whatever be the sort of poetry, epic, lyric or tragic, in which the representation is given.