lyrical


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Related to lyrical: wax lyrical

lyr·i·cal

 (lĭr′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1.
a. Expressing deep personal emotion or observations: a dancer's lyrical performance; a lyrical passage in his autobiography.
b. Highly enthusiastic; rhapsodic: gave a lyrical description of her experiences in the South Seas.
2. Lyric.

lyr′i·cal·ly adv.
lyr′i·cal·ness n.

lyrical

(ˈlɪrɪkəl)
adj
1. (Music, other) another word for lyric1, lyric2, lyric3, lyric4
2. (Poetry) another word for lyric1, lyric2, lyric3, lyric4
3. enthusiastic; effusive (esp in the phrase to wax lyrical)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.lyrical - suitable for or suggestive of singing
melodic, melodious, musical - containing or constituting or characterized by pleasing melody; "the melodious song of a meadowlark"
2.lyrical - expressing deep emotion; "the dancer's lyrical performance"
emotional - of more than usual emotion; "his behavior was highly emotional"
Translations

lyrical

[ˈlɪrɪkəl] ADJ (lit) → lírico (fig) → entusiasmado
to wax or become lyrical about or over sthdeshacerse en elogios a algo
he was waxing lyrical about my roast beefse deshacía en elogios a mi rosbif, estaba entusiasmado con mi rosbif

lyrical

[ˈlɪrɪkəl] adj
(= poetical) → lyrique
to grow lyrical (= very enthusiastic) → devenir lyrique

lyrical

adjlyrisch; (fig: = enthusiastic) → schwärmerisch; to wax lyrical about somethingüber etw (acc)ins Schwärmen geraten

lyrical

[ˈlɪrɪkl] adjlirico/a (fig) → entusiasta
to wax or become lyrical about sth → infervorarsi a parlare di qc
References in classic literature ?
Now, in the first place, this censure attaches not to the poetic but to the histrionic art; for gesticulation may be equally overdone in epic recitation, as by Sosi-stratus, or in lyrical competition, as by Mnasitheus the Opuntian.
Only at rare moments of exaltation or despair do we hear the lyrical cry rising above the monotone of dreamlike content.
They at length decided to publish a book together to be called Lyrical Ballads.
Among the poems which Wordsworth wrote for the book of Lyrical Ballads, was one which every one knows, We are Seven.
But right before him was the way home, which pointed only to bed, a place of little ease for one whose fancy was strung to the lyrical pitch, and whose not very ardent heart was just then tumultuously moved.
The Russian military historians in so far as they submit to claims of logic must admit that conclusion, and in spite of their lyrical rhapsodies about valor, devotion, and so forth, must reluctantly admit that the French retreat from Moscow was a series of victories for Napoleon and defeats for Kutuzov.
It was a song that imitated the measure of beating upon iron, and was a mere lyrical excuse for the introduction of Old Clem's respected name.
Shall I propose, then, that she be allowed to return from exile, but upon this condition only--that she make a defence of herself in lyrical or some other metre?
He stood in the handsomely furnished apartment, and held between his fingers a small sheet of rose-colored paper, on which some verses were written--written indeed by the officer himself; for who has not', at least once in his life, had a lyrical moment?
The characteristics of our romantic are to understand everything, to see everything and to see it often incomparably more clearly than our most realistic minds see it; to refuse to accept anyone or anything, but at the same time not to despise anything; to give way, to yield, from policy; never to lose sight of a useful practical object (such as rent-free quarters at the government expense, pensions, decorations), to keep their eye on that object through all the enthusiasms and volumes of lyrical poems, and at the same time to preserve "the sublime and the beautiful" inviolate within them to the hour of their death, and to preserve themselves also, incidentally, like some precious jewel wrapped in cotton wool if only for the benefit of "the sublime and the beautiful.
This charming fancifulness and delicacy of feeling is apparently the great contribution of the Britons to English literature; from it may perhaps be descended the fairy scenes of Shakspere and possibly to some extent the lyrical music of Tennyson.
their speech shall be lyrical, and sweet, and universal as the rising of the wind.