lyricism


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lyr·i·cism

 (lĭr′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. The character or quality of subjectivity and sensuality of expression, especially in the arts.
b. The quality or state of being melodious; melodiousness.
2. An intense outpouring of exuberant emotion.

lyricism

(ˈlɪrɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. (Poetry) the quality or style of lyric poetry
2. emotional or enthusiastic outpouring

lyr•i•cism

(ˈlɪr əˌsɪz əm)

n.
1. lyric character or style, as in poetry.
2. lyric outpouring of feeling.
[1750–1760]

lyricism

the practice of writing verse in song form rather than narrative form to embody the poet’s thoughts and emotions. Also lyrism.lyricist, n. — lyrical, adj.
See also: Verse
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lyricism - the property of being suitable for singing
musicality, musicalness - the property of sounding like music
2.lyricism - unrestrained and exaggerated enthusiasm
ebullience, enthusiasm, exuberance - overflowing with eager enjoyment or approval

lyricism

noun
Something likened to poetry, as in form or style:
Translations

lyricism

[ˈlɪrɪsɪzem] Nlirismo m

lyricism

[ˈlɪrɪsɪzəm] nlyrisme m

lyricism

nLyrik f

lyricism

[ˈlɪrɪˌsɪzm] nlirismo
References in classic literature ?
The lyricism of the evening was in the cellar at present, and was not to be drawn from that retreat just yet.
Poyser would probably have brought her rejoinder to a further climax, if every one's attention had not at this moment been called to the other end of the table, where the lyricism, which had at first only manifested itself by David's sotto voce performance of "My love's a rose without a thorn," had gradually assumed a rather deafening and complex character.
His first impulse was an unselfish love for his fellow-men, with an aggressive eagerness for martyrdom in their behalf; his nature was unusually, even abnormally, fine and sensitive; and his poetic quality was a delicate and ethereal lyricism unsurpassed in the literature of the world.
As his first work on lyricism following extensive study, the outcome of these lectures at Peking University, published in 2010 as Shuqingchuantong yu zhongguo xiandaxing [phrase omitted] (Lyrical Tradition and Chinese Modernity, 2010) (1a), is a compilation of monumental significance.
British poet and writer Fiona Sampson is beloved for the lyricism and scope of her writing, andLimestone Country is no exception.
These poems come from a deep well of experience that is translated, right in front of us, into hard-won craft and exacting lyricism.
She discusses pseudo-writing and creating channels for the expression of emotion, creating melodramatic emotional effects: Zhou Shoujuan's creative translations of short stories on love, transcultural lyricism in Su Manshu's fictional writing, and finding the right medium for emotion expression: inter-textualizing Western literary texts in Yu Dafu's early short stories.
This piece would require the student performer to tackle challenges of lyricism and phrasing.
It really rides through peaks and valleys, all the while playing with a folk dance theme, performed by PNB with both gusto and lyricism.
With his explicit politics and his commitment to harmony and lyricism, Tony Bird remains a captivating singer-songwriter.
Students compete for standard baroque through contemporary repertory prizes, as well as in novel categories such as original concerto cadenzas, jazz or classical improvisation, versatility, lyricism in slow works, original compositions, works by female composers and tasteful arrangements or transcriptions.
But now the rich lyricism, with its echoes of Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, Leonard Cohen and Tom Waits at their best, is delivered with a smile.