lyricism


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lyr·i·cism

 (lĭr′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. The character or quality of subjectivity and sensuality of expression, especially in the arts.
b. The quality or state of being melodious; melodiousness.
2. An intense outpouring of exuberant emotion.

lyricism

(ˈlɪrɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. (Poetry) the quality or style of lyric poetry
2. emotional or enthusiastic outpouring

lyr•i•cism

(ˈlɪr əˌsɪz əm)

n.
1. lyric character or style, as in poetry.
2. lyric outpouring of feeling.
[1750–1760]

lyricism

the practice of writing verse in song form rather than narrative form to embody the poet’s thoughts and emotions. Also lyrism.lyricist, n. — lyrical, adj.
See also: Verse
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lyricism - the property of being suitable for singing
musicality, musicalness - the property of sounding like music
2.lyricism - unrestrained and exaggerated enthusiasm
ebullience, enthusiasm, exuberance - overflowing with eager enjoyment or approval

lyricism

noun
Something likened to poetry, as in form or style:
Translations

lyricism

[ˈlɪrɪsɪzem] Nlirismo m

lyricism

[ˈlɪrɪsɪzəm] nlyrisme m

lyricism

nLyrik f

lyricism

[ˈlɪrɪˌsɪzm] nlirismo
References in classic literature ?
The lyricism of the evening was in the cellar at present, and was not to be drawn from that retreat just yet.
Poyser would probably have brought her rejoinder to a further climax, if every one's attention had not at this moment been called to the other end of the table, where the lyricism, which had at first only manifested itself by David's sotto voce performance of "My love's a rose without a thorn," had gradually assumed a rather deafening and complex character.
His first impulse was an unselfish love for his fellow-men, with an aggressive eagerness for martyrdom in their behalf; his nature was unusually, even abnormally, fine and sensitive; and his poetic quality was a delicate and ethereal lyricism unsurpassed in the literature of the world.
Rogister remarkably clear orchestral textures never detracted from the nervy, frenzied lyricism of the Schoen-berg or the fervid, brooding expression of the Bartok.
With his explicit politics and his commitment to harmony and lyricism, Tony Bird remains a captivating singer-songwriter.
Students compete for standard baroque through contemporary repertory prizes, as well as in novel categories such as original concerto cadenzas, jazz or classical improvisation, versatility, lyricism in slow works, original compositions, works by female composers and tasteful arrangements or transcriptions.
But now the rich lyricism, with its echoes of Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, Leonard Cohen and Tom Waits at their best, is delivered with a smile.
The band's debut album, Voices Of Animals And Men, is a masterclass in abrasive punk-pop and witty lyricism with subjects switching eccentrically from snobby parents to sewing buttons.
Highlights include the sparkling lyricism of "A Remark You Made"
Two 19th Century virtuoso violinists bring their own characters to bear on the Italian bel canto style, Paganini gilding his lyricism with typically brilliant roulades and Spohr winning us over with his melodic charms.
Drummer Jaleel Bunton's thundering yet elastic drumlines play out and around Malone's delicately fuzzed guitar lines and producer/multi-instrumentalist David Sitek has a seemingly bottomless library of weird electronic bleeps, blips and sound fragments that lend emotional weight to the band's complex yet firmly tongue-in-cheek lyricism and set them apart from the self-involved shoe-gazing endemic to the current alt-rock scene.
90 emerged clearly as the crossroads in Beethoven's pianistic output, the composer bidding a lovely farewell to the finale's song-like lyricism and opting for the fragmentary, questing sound-world of the opening movement.