macabre


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ma·ca·bre

 (mə-kä′brə, mə-käb′, -kä′bər)
adj.
1. Upsetting or horrifying by association with death or injury; gruesome: "When Lucia describes [the saints'] torments, Jo sees a chorus of macabre dolls, most of them missing parts" (Nancy Reisman). See Synonyms at ghastly.
2. Constituting or including a representation of death.

[Ultimately from Old French (Danse) Macabré, (dance) of death, perhaps from alteration of Macabe, Maccabee, from Latin Maccabaeus, from Greek Makkabios.]

ma·ca′bre·ly adv.
Word History: The word macabre comes from the Middle French phrase Danse Macabré, "the Dance of Death," which was a popular subject of art and literature in the late Middle Ages. In representations of this dance, Death is shown leading people of all classes and walks of life to the same inescapable fate. John Lydgate is the first English author known to mention the Danse Macabré in English, in his work Macabrees daunce from around 1430. Lydgate's poem purports to be a translation of a French poem describing a group of famous painted murals of the Danse Macabré located in a cemetery in Paris. The original meaning of Macabré in the French term Danse Macabré is not known with any certainty, but it may be an alteration of Old French Macabe, "a Maccabee." The Maccabees were Jewish martyrs honored by a feast day in the Western Church. The Second Book of Maccabees, a book of the biblical Apocrypha, tells of the persecutions endured by the Jewish people in the second century bc at the hands of the Seleucid authorities, and it includes a description of a series of gruesome martyrdoms suffered by members of the Maccabees. There was a medieval Christian allegorical procession, called a chorea maccabaeorum ("dance of the Maccabees") in Latin, that may have included a reenactment of these horrors, and the literary and artistic motif of the Danse Macabré may have originated in part from this procession.

macabre

(məˈkɑːbə; -brə)
adj
1. gruesome; ghastly; grim
2. (Art Terms) resembling or associated with the danse macabre
[C15: from Old French danse macabre dance of death, probably from macabé relating to the Maccabees, who were associated with death because of the doctrines and prayers for the dead in II Macc. (12:43–46)]
maˈcabrely adv

ma•ca•bre

(məˈkɑ brə, -ˈkɑb, -ˈkɑ bər)

adj.
1. gruesome in character; ghastly.
2. of, dealing with, or representing death.
Sometimes, ma•ca•ber (məˈkɑ bər)
[1400–50; < French; orig. uncertain]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.macabre - shockingly repellentmacabre - shockingly repellent; inspiring horror; "ghastly wounds"; "the grim aftermath of the bombing"; "the grim task of burying the victims"; "a grisly murder"; "gruesome evidence of human sacrifice"; "macabre tales of war and plague in the Middle ages"; "macabre tortures conceived by madmen"
alarming - frightening because of an awareness of danger

macabre

macabre

adjective
1. Susceptible to or marked by preoccupation with unwholesome matters:
2. Shockingly repellent:
Translations
رَهيب، مُرَوِع
macabre
strašidelný
makaber
óhugnanlegur, dauîa-
makabriškas
drausmīgsšaušalīgs
îngrozitormacabru

macabre

[məˈkɑːbr] ADJmacabro

macabre

[məˈkɑːbrə] adjmacabre

macabre

adjmakaber

macabre

[məˈkɑːbr] adjmacabro/a

macabre

(məˈkaːbr) adjective
weird, unearthly or horrible. macabre horror stories.
References in classic literature ?
Gounod had conducted the Funeral March of a Marionnette; Reyer, his beautiful overture to Siguar; Saint Saens, the Danse Macabre and a Reverie Orientale; Massenet, an unpublished Hungarian march; Guiraud, his Carnaval; Delibes, the Valse Lente from Sylvia and the Pizzicati from Coppelia.
The ears hung at different angles, negligently; and the macabre figure of that mute dweller on the earth steamed straight up from ribs and backbone in the muggy stillness of the air.
Such extreme attention to surface, to finish, to impeccable form (in attire, in manners, in behavior}, th artist implies, drains the life out of the living, and turns human beings into the props of some macabre theater.
This horrific action game contains elements of role-playing and puzzle solving in the midst of the strange and macabre.
26, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Macabre Mansion, an online destination for evocative dramatizations of great literature, is on a quest to resurrect the spirit of the old-time radio drama.
Defending, Duncan McReddie, said: "It may be a rather strange, macabre and unpleasant collection, but it is what he collects.
Tales of Murder, Mystery and the Macabre (Neo-Gothic fiction inspired by the imagination of Edgar Allan Poe).
Gaiman's works all hold fine and winning blends of compelling characters and unusual spins on life and perception, making them special recommendations for the follower of macabre short fictions.
Local minister Reverend Arthur Christie said: "It's shocking and macabre.
Dismiss the film's macabre title, it's cosy matinee fare.
IF YOU'RE the sort of person who loves Halloween and all things macabre, then these might just be the pictures for you.
Tout nous laisse a penser malheureusement aussi que les shebab se preparent a organiser une mise en scene macabre et indigne" avec les corps, a-t-il ajoute.