machair


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machair

(ˈmæxər)
n
(Agriculture) Scot (in the western Highlands of Scotland) a strip of sandy, grassy, often lime-rich land just above the high-water mark at a sandy shore: used as grazing or arable land
[C17: from Scottish Gaelic]
References in periodicals archive ?
The native Gaelic speaker worked on the stage and on TV shows such as Machair before fibromyalgia put the tin lid on her acting career.
Shore beats the Caribbean I'd argue that Luskentyre beach in the Hebrides matches the beauty of any Caribbean coast, not only because of its white powder sands and aquamarine sea, but because of the machair that paints a rainbow of wildflowers along the shore fringes in summertime.
Once you have been fully engaged with the two children and their activities in the sea, on the sand dunes and the machair (unfamiliar vocabulary is one of the things to learn), it could be fun to spot how the alphabet comes into play.
Verges on the current approach are grassed type verges typical of roads in machair areas.
VISIT Predominantly Gaelic speaking the island has white sandy beaches backed by shell-sand, machair and the east has numerous rocky inlets.
Other examples include the crofting systems and machair grassland of the Highlands and islands of Scotland and low-input mixed-farming systems, which maintain a mosaic of semi-natural landscape features and support a rich assemblage of wildlife.
From machair to mountains; archaeological survey and excavation in South Uist.
Sitting in the silence of the ancient abbey as dusk falls, and in the presence of the saints, is a profound experience; as is taking a walk across the Machair to the other end of the island and contemplating the beautifully deserted bay where Columba is believed to have landed.
Four programmes had been created for broadcast within Scotland: High Living (1968-71), its spin-off, A Place of Her Own (1971), Garnock Way (1976-79) and the Gaelic language soap, Machair (STV, 1993-98).
in the 1980s, Sanday was a hive of archaeological activity, boasting not only John Hunter's investigations behind the cliff-section at Pool (1983-88) but also Stephen Dockrill's work on the machair at Tofts Ness (1985-88).
EYES of yellow arctic fire gazed at me with contempt across the flattened grasses of the machair.
They are often backed by coastal grass and dunes, known as machair, which host wild flowers in the spring and summer.