machinelike


Also found in: Thesaurus.

ma•chine•like

(məˈʃinˌlaɪk)

adj.
like a machine in uniform pattern of operation.
[1690–1700]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.machinelike - resembling the unthinking functioning of a machine; "an automatic `thank you'"; "machinelike efficiency"
mechanical - using (or as if using) mechanisms or tools or devices; "a mechanical process"; "his smile was very mechanical"; "a mechanical toy"
References in periodicals archive ?
The goal is not to make a board a hyperrational, machinelike apparatus," Sulkowicz says.
With a band such as Unearth, it's easy to get caught up in the volume and testosterone, when what you should be really listening to is the virtuosity, the way each note and drumbeat falls with almost machinelike precision, despite the music's frenetic pace.
Whether animal-like or machinelike, human beings seen in these terms are material objects, as lacking in any other identity as Darl's wooden dolls.
Entertainment Weekly recently paid credit to the band's relentless touring while Rolling Stone raves FLYLEAF "marries dark wounded lyrics with snarling, metallic guitars and machinelike drums.
Minsky, a computer scientist, proposes that thinking can be understood as a series of machinelike processes.
It would be almost tempting to call the Phil a well-oiled machine because of its precision and Salonen's strong hand, but there is nothing machinelike about the sound, which had a simmering brilliance.
Darwin's world, for example, was populated by machinelike creatures.
He had, after all, reflected on the way machine technology had "altered the look of things" in 1914, prior to his wartime encounter with "the magic of light on white metal," and the abstract paintings he produced in the Contrast of Forms series in 1913 had already infused the Cubist aesthetic with a machinelike dynamism quite unlike anything to be found in Picasso or Braque.
The effect is of sinking headfirst into an infinite, viscid time-space that induces an almost nightmarish sort of absorption, aided by the composer Becky Allen and filmmaker James Benning's sound track of machinelike humming subtended by pulsating drones.
It gets the job done, not machinelike, not pretty, but it gets done.
That's because we can usually still detect a robot's eerie, machinelike movement or cold, mechanistic facial expressions - no matter how much it resembles us.