mackinaw

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mackinaw

mack·i·naw

 (măk′ə-nô′)
n.
1. A short, double-breasted coat of heavy, usually plaid, woolen material.
2. The cloth from which such a coat is made, usually of wool, often with a heavy nap.
3.
a. A flatbottom boat pointed at both ends and often rigged as a schooner, historically used on the upper Great Lakes.
b. A flatbottom boat historically used on the Missouri River and its tributaries.

[After Old Mackinac, a fort on the site of present-day Mackinaw City in northern Michigan.]

Mackinaw

1. A heavy blanket formerly supplied to Indians of the Northwest by the U.S. Government.
2. A coat made of mackinaw-like material.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Mackinaw - a short plaid coat made of made of thick woolen materialmackinaw - a short plaid coat made of made of thick woolen material
coat - an outer garment that has sleeves and covers the body from shoulder down; worn outdoors
2.Mackinaw - a thick plaid blanket formerly used in the northwestern United Statesmackinaw - a thick plaid blanket formerly used in the northwestern United States
blanket, cover - bedding that keeps a person warm in bed; "he pulled the covers over his head and went to sleep"
3.Mackinaw - a flat-bottomed boat used on upper Great Lakesmackinaw - a flat-bottomed boat used on upper Great Lakes
boat - a small vessel for travel on water
4.Mackinaw - a heavy woolen cloth heavily napped and felted, often with a plaid designmackinaw - a heavy woolen cloth heavily napped and felted, often with a plaid design
cloth, fabric, textile, material - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"
References in classic literature ?
The chief factory was established at the old emporium of Michilimackinac, from which place the association took its name, and was commonly called the Mackinaw Company.
While the Northwesters continued to push their enterprises into the hyperborean regions from their stronghold at Fort William, and to hold almost sovereign sway over the tribes of the upper lakes and rivers, the Mackinaw Company sent forth their light perogues and barks, by Green Bay, Fox River, and the Wisconsin, to that areas artery of the West, the Mississippi; and down that stream to all its tributary rivers.
As the Mackinaw Company still continued its rivalry, and as the fur trade would not advantageously admit of competition, he made a new arrangement in 1811, by which, in conjunction with certain partners of the Northwest Company, and other persons engaged in the fur trade, he bought out the Mackinaw Company, and merged that and the American Fur Company into a new association, to be called the "Southwest Company.
Upon my word were I at Mackinaw, I should take this to be the inside of an Indian wigwam.
They rolled into their robes, all-standing, each with a woolen Mackinaw jacket on in place of the parkas[5] they had worn all day.