macrocosm


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mac·ro·cosm

 (măk′rə-kŏz′əm)
n.
1. The entire world; the universe.
2. A system reflecting on a large scale one of its component systems or parts.

[Medieval Latin macrocosmus : Greek makro-, macro- + Greek kosmos, world.]

mac′ro·cos′mic adj.
mac′ro·cos′mic·al·ly adv.

macrocosm

(ˈmækrəˌkɒzəm)
n
1. a complex structure, such as the universe or society, regarded as an entirety, as opposed to microcosms, which have a similar structure and are contained within it
2. any complex entity regarded as a complete system in itself
[C16: via French and Latin from Greek makros kosmos great world]
ˌmacroˈcosmic adj
ˌmacroˈcosmically adv

mac•ro•cosm

(ˈmæk rəˌkɒz əm)

n.
the universe considered as a whole (opposed to microcosm).
[1590–1600; (< Middle French) < Medieval Latin macrocosmus; see macro-, cosmos]
mac`ro•cos′mic, adj.
mac`ro•cos′mi•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.macrocosm - everything that exists anywheremacrocosm - everything that exists anywhere; "they study the evolution of the universe"; "the biggest tree in existence"
natural object - an object occurring naturally; not made by man
extragalactic nebula, galaxy - (astronomy) a collection of star systems; any of the billions of systems each having many stars and nebulae and dust; "`extragalactic nebula' is a former name for `galaxy'"
celestial body, heavenly body - natural objects visible in the sky
closed universe - (cosmology) a universe that is spatially closed and in which there is sufficient matter to halt the expansion that began with the big bang; the visible matter is only 10 percent of the matter required for closure but there may be large amounts of dark matter
estraterrestrial body, extraterrestrial object - a natural object existing outside the earth and outside the earth's atmosphere
natural order - the physical universe considered as an orderly system subject to natural (not human or supernatural) laws
nature - the natural physical world including plants and animals and landscapes etc.; "they tried to preserve nature as they found it"

macrocosm

noun
The totality of all existing things:
Translations
macrocosmos
macrocosmmacrocosmos

macrocosm

[ˈmækrəʊkɒzəm] Nmacrocosmo m

macrocosm

[ˈmækrəʊkɒzəm] n [universe, society] → macrocosme m

macrocosm

nMakrokosmos m; the macrocosm of Italian societydie italienische Gesellschaft als ganzes or in ihrer Gesamtheit

macrocosm

[ˈmækrəˌkɒzəm] nmacrocosmo

macrocosm

n. macrocosmo.
1. el universo como representación del ser humano;
2. el universo considerado como un todo.
References in periodicals archive ?
From the microcosm of Last Words to the macrocosm of The Central Body, "Body and City" was less a retrospective than what van der Keuken terms a whole new phase in his work.
Since according to tantric principles there is a total parallelism between the microcosm of physical reality and the macrocosm of the universe, the revelation of these dynamic forces in the human body is said to lead to the comprehension of universal reality.
Nyandoro explains that by moving to DIFC, Kiza can leverage the macrocosm of the surrounding community, making a bold statement into the bargain.
Indeed, regarding structure, the book as a whole is a macrocosm of the individual chapters, with an introduction and conclusion bookending the four main chapters, which examine power relationships between major characters and their environments.
The coming together of Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) and the Jammu and Kashmir Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) to form a coalition government in the state is no less than a aACAychutzpah' moment -- not only for an average Kashmiri, but for the macrocosm of Indian politics as well.
She is passionate about food, nutrients, and our interaction with our environment, from the microcosm to the macrocosm.
The three laws of dialectics, namely i) the unity or the interpenetration of the opposites, ii) the inter-conversion of quality and quantity and iii) the negation of the negation mediated by chance and necessity; provide an essential basis for an understanding of nature from the microcosm to the macrocosm [2].
In her new work in progress, Core Biopsies, Das Gupta explores the similarities found in the macrocosm of earth forms and those found in the microcosm of the human body's cellular structures--core samples of the earth or biopsies of the flesh that reflect external and internal ecosystems.
It's vital to create the climate in the microcosm that we say we want in the macrocosm.
In a way the incident is a microcosm of the talks' macrocosm.
It's filled with talk of patron saints, martyrdom, and dying faith in a world gone wrong, and uses the macrocosm of Cuba as its reference point for events that blossom from this pivot point in time and place.
A Litopenaeus vannamei biofloc culture was maintained in the macrocosm tank without water renewal.