madame

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Related to Madames: ma'am

Ma·dame

 (mə-dăm′, măd′əm)
n. pl. Mes·dames (mā-dăm′, -däm′) Abbr. Mme
1. Used as a courtesy title before the surname or full name of a woman, especially a married woman, in a French-speaking area: Madame Cartier; Madame Jacqueline Cartier. See Usage Note at miss2.
2. madame Used as a form of polite address for a woman in a French-speaking area.

[French, from Old French ma dame : ma, my (from Latin mea, feminine of meus; see me- in Indo-European roots) + dame, lady (from Latin domina, feminine of dominus, lord, master of a household; see dem- in Indo-European roots).]

madame

(ˈmædəm; French madam)
n, pl mesdames (ˈmeɪˌdæm; French medam)
a married Frenchwoman: usually used as a title equivalent to Mrs, and sometimes extended to older unmarried women to show respect and to women of other nationalities
[C17: from French. See madam]

mad•ame

(məˈdæm, -ˈdɑm, mæ-, ˈmæd əm)

n., pl. mes•dames (meɪˈdæm, -ˈdɑm)
(often cap.)
1. a French title equivalent to Mrs.: Madame Curie.
2. a title for a woman, esp. one who comes from a non-English-speaking country. Abbr.: Mme.
[1590–1600; < French; see madam]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.madame - title used for a married Frenchwomanmadame - title used for a married Frenchwoman
gentlewoman, ma'am, madam, lady, dame - a woman of refinement; "a chauffeur opened the door of the limousine for the grand lady"
Translations

madame

[ˈmædəm] N (mesdames (pl)) [ˈmeɪdæm]
1.madama f, señora f
Madame Dupontla señora de Dupont
2. [of brothel] → madama f, dueña f
References in classic literature ?
Behind Madame de Saint-Remy stood Mademoiselle de la Valliere.
And you, mademoiselle; you may be certain I shall inform madame of what is going on in the apartment of one of her ladies of honor
It was with a heavy heart, and many sad forebodings which no effort could banish, that Kate Nickleby, on the morning appointed for the commencement of her engagement with Madame Mantalini, left the city when its clocks yet wanted a quarter of an hour of eight, and threaded her way alone, amid the noise and bustle of the streets, towards the west end of London.
She arrived at Madame Mantalini's some minutes before the appointed hour, and after walking a few times up and down, in the hope that some other female might arrive and spare her the embarrassment of stating her business to the servant, knocked timidly at the door: which, after some delay, was opened by the footman, who had been putting on his striped jacket as he came upstairs, and was now intent on fastening his apron.
On these steps, by-the-by, I have not unfrequently seen Madame Pelet seated with a trencher on her knee, engaged in the threefold employment of eating her dinner, gossiping with her favourite servant, the housemaid, and scolding her antagonist, the cook; she never dined, and seldom indeed took any meal with her son; and as to showing her face at the boys' table, that was quite out of the question.
Madame Pelet's habits of life, then, being taken into consideration, I was a good deal surprised when, one Thursday evening (Thursday was always a half-holiday), as I was sitting all alone in my apartment, correcting a huge pile of English and Latin exercises, a servant tapped at the door, and, on its being opened, presented Madame Pelet's compliments, and she would be happy to see me to take my "gouter" (a meal which answers to our English "tea") with her in the dining-room.
When Saint Antoine had again enfolded the Defarges in his dusky wings, and they, having finally alighted near the Saint's boundaries, were picking their way on foot through the black mud and offal of his streets, Madame Defarge spoke to her husband:
The baron, followed by the count, traversed a long series of apartments, in which the prevailing characteristics were heavy magnificence and the gaudiness of ostentatious wealth, until he reached the boudoir of Madame Danglars -- a small octagonal-shaped room, hung with pink satin, covered with white Indian muslin.
In his whole person he bore such an impress of high degree, that Madame de Chevreuse half rose from her seat when she saw him and made him a sign to sit down near her.
Tristram told him that her beautiful friend, Madame de Cintre, had returned from the country; that she had met her three days before, coming out of the Church of St.
After she had made a curtsey at the threshold, she would walk up the aisle between the double lines of chairs, open Madame Aubain's pew, sit down and look around.
Madame Granson looked at her son in a mirror, and thought him pale; but he had been so all day, for a vague rumor of the matter had already reached him.