madding


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mad·ding

 (măd′ĭng)
adj.
In a state of frenzy; frenzied: "far from the madding crowd's ignoble strife" (Thomas Gray).

madding

(ˈmædɪŋ)
adj
1. acting or behaving as if mad: the madding crowd.
2. making mad; maddening
ˈmaddingly adv

mad•ding

(ˈmæd ɪŋ)

adj.
tumultuous: the madding crowd.
[1300–50]

madding

- In "far from the madding crowd," madding is a poetic survival meaning "wild, furious, raving, mad."
See also related terms for mad.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

madding

adjective
Archaic. Marked by extreme excitement, confusion, or agitation:
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Amazement seis'd The Rebel Thrones, but greater rage to see Thus foil'd thir mightiest, ours joy filld, and shout, Presage of Victorie and fierce desire Of Battel: whereat MICHAEL bid sound Th' Arch-Angel trumpet; through the vast of Heav'n It sounded, and the faithful Armies rung HOSANNA to the Highest: nor stood at gaze The adverse Legions, nor less hideous joyn'd The horrid shock: now storming furie rose, And clamour such as heard in Heav'n till now Was never, Arms on Armour clashing bray'd Horrible discord, and the madding Wheeles Of brazen Chariots rag'd; dire was the noise Of conflict; over head the dismal hiss Of fiery Darts in flaming volies flew, And flying vaulted either Host with fire.
I agreed with George, and suggested that we should seek out some retired and old-world spot, far from the madding crowd, and dream away a sunny week among its drowsy lanes - some half-forgotten nook, hidden away by the fairies, out of reach of the noisy world - some quaint-perched eyrie on the cliffs of Time, from whence the surging waves of the nineteenth century would sound far-off and faint.
The Return of the Native' (1878) and 'Far from the Madding Crowd' (1874) are among his best novels, though the sensational frankness of 'Tess of the D'Urbervilles' (1891) has given it greater reputation.