madeleine


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mad·e·leine

 (măd′ə-lĕn′)
n.
A small rich cake, baked in a shell-shaped mold.

[French, from earler gâteau à la Madeleine, cake à la Madeleine, after the name Madeleine, perhaps that of the person who invented or popularized the cakes.]

madeleine

(ˈmædəlɪn; -ˌleɪn)
n
(Cookery) a small fancy sponge cake
[C19: perhaps after Madeleine Paulmier, French pastry cook]

mad•e•leine

(ˈmæd l ɪn, ˌmæd lˈeɪn, -ˈɛn)

n.
1. a small shell-shaped cake.
2. something that triggers memories or nostalgia.
[1835–45; < French, earlier gâteau à la Madeleine, after the given name]
References in classic literature ?
But when he was alone with the hostess he said: "Now, pretty Madeleine, you know the difference between a Swiss and a gentleman.
The spit turned, the stove roared, the pretty Madeleine wept; D'Artagnan felt himself invaded by hunger, cold and love.
There he found Madeleine alarmed for his safety and anxious to tell him all the events of the evening, but he cut her short by ordering her to put his supper in his room and give him with it a bottle of good Burgundy.
D'Artagnan opened the door and called out to a waiter to desire Madeleine to come upstairs.
That is to say, I guess your wishes, and that is all that's necessary," said Madeleine.
His wife, on the contrary, whose maiden name had been Madeleine Radelle, was pale, meagre, and sickly-looking.
The sobriquet of La Carconte had been bestowed on Madeleine Radelle from the fact that she had been born in a village, so called, situated between Salon and Lambesc; and as a custom existed among the inhabitants of that part of France where Caderousse lived of styling every person by some particular and distinctive appellation, her husband had bestowed on her the name of La Carconte in place of her sweet and euphonious name of Madeleine, which, in all probability, his rude gutteral language would not have enabled him to pronounce.
He told me of the long hours he spent walking about the Boulevard de la Madeleine on the look-out for Englishmen, preferably the worse for liquor, who desired to see things which the law forbade.
I can't make up my mind if I shall call her Madeleine or Cecilia.
We have seen the Tuileries, the Napoleon Column, the Madeleine, that wonder of wonders the tomb of Napoleon, all the great churches and museums, libraries, imperial palaces, and sculpture and picture galleries, the Pantheon, Jardin des Plantes, the opera, the circus, the legislative body, the billiard rooms, the barbers, the grisettes--
com/royals/prince-william-and-kate-middleton-will-miss-meeting-these-swedish-royals-on-their-visit-to-stockholm/) not have the chance to meet up with Princess Madeleine, Prince Carl Philip and their daughter, Princess Leonore.
Clara Beaudoux and Alison Anderson (translator); THE MADELEINE PROJECT; New Vessel Press (Nonfiction: Culture) 23.