magnanimous


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

mag·nan·i·mous

 (măg-năn′ə-məs)
adj.
Highly moral, especially in showing kindness or forgiveness, as in overlooking insults or not seeking revenge.

[From Latin magnanimus : magnus, great; see meg- in Indo-European roots + animus, soul, mind; see anə- in Indo-European roots.]

mag·nan′i·mous·ly adv.
mag·nan′i·mous·ness n.

magnanimous

(mæɡˈnænɪməs)
adj
generous and noble
[C16: from Latin magnanimus great-souled]
magˈnanimously adv
magˈnanimousness n

mag•nan•i•mous

(mægˈnæn ə məs)

adj.
1. generous in forgiving an insult or injury; free from pettiness.
2. showing noble sensibility; high-minded.
[1575–85; < Latin magnanimus=magn(us) large, great + -animus, adj. derivative of animus mind, soul (see -ous)]
mag•nan′i•mous•ly, adv.
mag•nan′i•mous•ness, n.
syn: See noble.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.magnanimous - noble and generous in spiritmagnanimous - noble and generous in spirit; "a greathearted general"; "a magnanimous conqueror"
noble - having or showing or indicative of high or elevated character; "a noble spirit"; "noble deeds"
2.magnanimous - generous and understanding and tolerant; "a heart big enough to hold no grudges"; "that's very big of you to be so forgiving"; "a large and generous spirit"; "a large heart"; "magnanimous toward his enemies"
generous - not petty in character and mind; "unusually generous in his judgment of people"

magnanimous

magnanimous

adjective
Willing to give of oneself and one's possessions:
Translations
شَهْم، ذو نَخْوَه
velkodušný
storsindet
göfuglyndur
didžiadvasiškaididžiadvasiškasdidžiadvasiškumas
augstsirdīgs, cēls
yüce gönüllü

magnanimous

[mægˈnænɪməs] ADJmagnánimo (frm), generoso
to be magnanimous in victorymostrarse magnánimo con los perdedores
to be magnanimous to sbmostrarse magnánimo con algn (frm), mostrarse generoso con algn

magnanimous

[mægˈnænɪməs] adjmagnanime

magnanimous

adjgroßmütig, großherzig; (= generous)großzügig; to be magnanimous to somebodysich jdm gegenüber großherzig verhalten; he was magnanimous in victory/defeater zeigte Großmut im Sieg/in der Niederlage

magnanimous

[mægˈnænɪməs] adjmagnanimo/a

magnanimous

(mӕgˈnӕniməs) adjective
noble and generous. a magnanimous gesture.
magˈnanimously adverb
magnanimity (mӕgnəˈniməti) noun
References in classic literature ?
Do you suppose now, Ishmael, that the magnanimous God of heaven and earth --pagans and all included --can possibly be jealous of an insignificant bit of black wood?
If not a dominant and commanding race, they are, at least, an affectionate, magnanimous, and forgiving one.
A responsive titter rose among the younger spectators; checked immediately by magnanimous applause.
Stryver having made up his mind to that magnanimous bestowal of good fortune on the Doctor's daughter, resolved to make her happiness known to her before he left town for the Long Vacation.
And as this,' he added, after these magnanimous words, 'is not a fit scene for the boy - David, go to bed
said the pale young gentleman, reaching out his hand goodhumouredly, "it's all over now, I hope, and it will be magnanimous in you if you'll forgive me for having knocked you about so.
It was in this hall that Harold returned the magnanimous answer to the ambassador of his rebel brother.
His majesty, who is a most magnanimous prince, was less daunted than I could expect: he ordered me to return it into the scabbard, and cast it on the ground as gently as I could, about six feet from the end of my chain.
Then what I ask," said the damsel, "is that your magnanimous person accompany me at once whither I will conduct you, and that you promise not to engage in any other adventure or quest until you have avenged me of a traitor who against all human and divine law, has usurped my kingdom.
Finally, even if I had wanted to be anything but magnanimous, had desired on the contrary to revenge myself on my assailant, I could not have revenged myself on any one for anything because I should certainly never have made up my mind to do anything, even if I had been able to.
Well," said Morcerf, "I may as well be magnanimous, and tear myself away to forward your wishes.
Therefore, he who considers it necessary to secure himself in his new principality, to win friends, to overcome either by force or fraud, to make himself beloved and feared by the people, to be followed and revered by the soldiers, to exterminate those who have power or reason to hurt him, to change the old order of things for new, to be severe and gracious, magnanimous and liberal, to destroy a disloyal soldiery and to create new, to maintain friendship with kings and princes in such a way that they must help him with zeal and offend with caution, cannot find a more lively example than the actions of this man.