magnanimous


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

mag·nan·i·mous

 (măg-năn′ə-məs)
adj.
Highly moral, especially in showing kindness or forgiveness, as in overlooking insults or not seeking revenge.

[From Latin magnanimus : magnus, great; see meg- in Indo-European roots + animus, soul, mind; see anə- in Indo-European roots.]

mag·nan′i·mous·ly adv.
mag·nan′i·mous·ness n.

magnanimous

(mæɡˈnænɪməs)
adj
generous and noble
[C16: from Latin magnanimus great-souled]
magˈnanimously adv
magˈnanimousness n

mag•nan•i•mous

(mægˈnæn ə məs)

adj.
1. generous in forgiving an insult or injury; free from pettiness.
2. showing noble sensibility; high-minded.
[1575–85; < Latin magnanimus=magn(us) large, great + -animus, adj. derivative of animus mind, soul (see -ous)]
mag•nan′i•mous•ly, adv.
mag•nan′i•mous•ness, n.
syn: See noble.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.magnanimous - noble and generous in spiritmagnanimous - noble and generous in spirit; "a greathearted general"; "a magnanimous conqueror"
noble - having or showing or indicative of high or elevated character; "a noble spirit"; "noble deeds"
2.magnanimous - generous and understanding and tolerant; "a heart big enough to hold no grudges"; "that's very big of you to be so forgiving"; "a large and generous spirit"; "a large heart"; "magnanimous toward his enemies"
generous - not petty in character and mind; "unusually generous in his judgment of people"

magnanimous

magnanimous

adjective
Willing to give of oneself and one's possessions:
Translations
شَهْم، ذو نَخْوَه
velkodušný
storsindet
göfuglyndur
didžiadvasiškaididžiadvasiškasdidžiadvasiškumas
augstsirdīgs, cēls
yüce gönüllü

magnanimous

[mægˈnænɪməs] ADJmagnánimo (frm), generoso
to be magnanimous in victorymostrarse magnánimo con los perdedores
to be magnanimous to sbmostrarse magnánimo con algn (frm), mostrarse generoso con algn

magnanimous

[mægˈnænɪməs] adjmagnanime

magnanimous

adjgroßmütig, großherzig; (= generous)großzügig; to be magnanimous to somebodysich jdm gegenüber großherzig verhalten; he was magnanimous in victory/defeater zeigte Großmut im Sieg/in der Niederlage

magnanimous

[mægˈnænɪməs] adjmagnanimo/a

magnanimous

(mӕgˈnӕniməs) adjective
noble and generous. a magnanimous gesture.
magˈnanimously adverb
magnanimity (mӕgnəˈniməti) noun
References in classic literature ?
This speech so pleased the other Members of the convention that, actuated by a magnanimous impulse, they sprang to their feet and left the hall.
Finally, even if I had wanted to be anything but magnanimous, had desired on the contrary to revenge myself on my assailant, I could not have revenged myself on any one for anything because I should certainly never have made up my mind to do anything, even if I had been able to.
The third is of such, as take too high a strain at the first, and are magnanimous, more than tract of years can uphold.
At which time Miss Summerson's conduct was highly genteel; I may even add, magnanimous.
It ought to be less surprising that, since these dreadful words were written of him, more than one magnanimous Englishman has penitently expressed to the author the feeling that he was not so far wrong in his overboldly hazarded convictions.
Gracefulness belongeth to the munificence of the magnanimous.
But the coach was drawn by good horses, who soon carried Van Baerle away from among the shouts which the rabble roared in honour of the most magnanimous Stadtholder, mixing with it a spice of abuse against the brothers De Witt and the godson of Cornelius, who had just now been saved from death.
Do you suppose now, Ishmael, that the magnanimous God of heaven and earth --pagans and all included --can possibly be jealous of an insignificant bit of black wood?
But, I am sure that he is capable of good things, gentle things, even magnanimous things.
But Jones, as well as Partridge, was an entire stranger in London; and as he happened to arrive first in a quarter of the town, the inhabitants of which have very little intercourse with the householders of Hanover or Grosvenor-square (for he entered through Gray's-inn-lane), so he rambled about some time before he could even find his way to those happy mansions where fortune segregates from the vulgar those magnanimous heroes, the descendants of antient Britons, Saxons, or Danes, whose ancestors, being born in better days, by sundry kinds of merit, have entailed riches and honour on their posterity.
He felt that the husband was magnanimous even in his sorrow, while he had been base and petty in his deceit.
I had much ado to refrain from laughing as I beheld the magnanimous pity of his mien; maintaining, however, a grave air, I said:--