magnate


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mag·nate

 (măg′nāt′, -nĭt)
n.
A powerful or influential person, especially in business or industry: an oil magnate.

[Middle English magnates, magnates, high officials (attested only in pl.), perhaps from Late Latin magnātēs, pl. of magnās, great man , or from Late Latin magnātus, great man, both from Latin magnus, great; see meg- in Indo-European roots.]

magnate

(ˈmæɡneɪt; -nɪt)
n
1. a person of power and rank in any sphere, esp in industry
2. (Historical Terms) history a great nobleman
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) history a great nobleman
4. (Historical Terms) (formerly) a member of the upper chamber in certain European parliaments, as in Hungary
5. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (formerly) a member of the upper chamber in certain European parliaments, as in Hungary
[C15: back formation from earlier magnates from Late Latin: great men, plural of magnās, from Latin magnus great]
ˈmagnateˌship n

mag•nate

(ˈmæg neɪt, -nɪt)

n.
a person of great influence, importance, or standing in a particular field.
[1400–50; back formation from magnates (pl.), late Middle English < Late Latin magnātēs leading people]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.magnate - a very wealthy or powerful businessmanmagnate - a very wealthy or powerful businessman; "an oil baron"
businessman, man of affairs - a person engaged in commercial or industrial business (especially an owner or executive)
oil tycoon - a powerful person in the oil business

magnate

noun
1. tycoon, leader, chief, fat cat (slang, chiefly U.S.), baron, notable, mogul, bigwig (informal), grandee, big shot (informal), captain of industry, big wheel (slang), big cheese (slang, old-fashioned), plutocrat, big noise (informal), big hitter (informal), magnifico, heavy hitter (informal), nabob (informal), Mister Big (slang, chiefly U.S.), V.I.P. a multimillionaire shipping magnate
Translations
قَطْب، رَجُل عَظيم
magnát
=-magnatmagnat
mágnás
áhrifamaîur
lielīpašnieksmagnāts
kodamannüfuzlu kimse

magnate

[ˈmægneɪt] Nmagnate mf, potentado/a m/f

magnate

[ˈmægneɪt] nmagnat m

magnate

nMagnat m

magnate

[ˈmægneɪt] nmagnate m

magnate

(ˈmӕgneit) noun
a man of wealth or power. He is a rich shipping magnate.
References in classic literature ?
I am told,' said Bishop magnate to Horse Guards, 'that Mr Merdle has made another enormous hit.
It was the first big magnate Daylight had met face to face, and he was pleased and charmed.
The girl thought the arrogance and granite-heartedness of the magnate of the play was very accurately drawn.
John Crook, journalist, had heard of that eminent City magnate; and it was not his fault if the City magnate had not heard of him; for in certain articles in The Clarion or The New Age Sir Leopold had been dealt with austerely.
When he was told that a local magnate had said no one would take him for a City man, he felt that he had not lived in vain.
He was no City magnate, nor had he ever received any training in those arts and practices which go to the making of one.
There's Senator Longbridge, for instance, and Claus Inskeep the street-car magnate, and Lane, and McChesney--" He paused, with voice suspended.
In June, after many balls and fetes given by the Polish magnates, by the courtiers, and by the Emperor himself, it occurred to one of the Polish aides-de-camp in attendance that a dinner and ball should be given for the Emperor by his aides-de-camp.
Few travellers that have visited Canada some thirty years since, in the days of the M'Tavishes, the M'Gillivrays, the M'Kenzies, the Frobishers, and the other magnates of the Northwest, when the company was in all its glory, but must remember the round of feasting and revelry kept up among these hyperborean nabobs.
This young man was the nephew of one of the Nob Hill magnates, who run the San Francisco Stock Exchange, much as more humble adventurers, in the corner of some public park at home, may be seen to perform the simple artifice of pea and thimble: for their own profit, that is to say, and the discouragement of public gambling.
The bread was new and crusty, the butter fresh, and the sugar lump, of course - in fulfilment of the standard testimony of the Coketown magnates, that these people lived like princes, sir.
When he felt his case unusually serious, and that he positively must find an opening, he would go on 'Change at a busy time, and walk in and out, in a kind of gloomy country dance figure, among the assembled magnates.