magnate

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mag·nate

 (măg′nāt′, -nĭt)
n.
A powerful or influential person, especially in business or industry: an oil magnate.

[Middle English magnates, magnates, high officials (attested only in pl.), perhaps from Late Latin magnātēs, pl. of magnās, great man , or from Late Latin magnātus, great man, both from Latin magnus, great; see meg- in Indo-European roots.]

magnate

(ˈmæɡneɪt; -nɪt)
n
1. a person of power and rank in any sphere, esp in industry
2. (Historical Terms) history a great nobleman
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) history a great nobleman
4. (Historical Terms) (formerly) a member of the upper chamber in certain European parliaments, as in Hungary
5. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (formerly) a member of the upper chamber in certain European parliaments, as in Hungary
[C15: back formation from earlier magnates from Late Latin: great men, plural of magnās, from Latin magnus great]
ˈmagnateˌship n

mag•nate

(ˈmæg neɪt, -nɪt)

n.
a person of great influence, importance, or standing in a particular field.
[1400–50; back formation from magnates (pl.), late Middle English < Late Latin magnātēs leading people]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.magnate - a very wealthy or powerful businessmanmagnate - a very wealthy or powerful businessman; "an oil baron"
businessman, man of affairs - a person engaged in commercial or industrial business (especially an owner or executive)
oil tycoon - a powerful person in the oil business

magnate

noun
1. tycoon, leader, chief, fat cat (slang, chiefly U.S.), baron, notable, mogul, bigwig (informal), grandee, big shot (informal), captain of industry, big wheel (slang), big cheese (slang, old-fashioned), plutocrat, big noise (informal), big hitter (informal), magnifico, heavy hitter (informal), nabob (informal), Mister Big (slang, chiefly U.S.), V.I.P. a multimillionaire shipping magnate
Translations
قَطْب، رَجُل عَظيم
magnát
=-magnatmagnat
mágnás
áhrifamaîur
lielīpašnieksmagnāts
kodamannüfuzlu kimse

magnate

[ˈmægneɪt] Nmagnate mf, potentado/a m/f

magnate

[ˈmægneɪt] nmagnat m

magnate

nMagnat m

magnate

[ˈmægneɪt] nmagnate m

magnate

(ˈmӕgneit) noun
a man of wealth or power. He is a rich shipping magnate.
References in classic literature ?
When he felt his case unusually serious, and that he positively must find an opening, he would go on 'Change at a busy time, and walk in and out, in a kind of gloomy country dance figure, among the assembled magnates.
The duchess and the duke came out to the door of the room to receive him, and with them a grave ecclesiastic, one of those who rule noblemen's houses; one of those who, not being born magnates themselves, never know how to teach those who are how to behave as such; one of those who would have the greatness of great folk measured by their own narrowness of mind; one of those who, when they try to introduce economy into the household they rule, lead it into meanness.
This young man was the nephew of one of the Nob Hill magnates, who run the San Francisco Stock Exchange, much as more humble adventurers, in the corner of some public park at home, may be seen to perform the simple artifice of pea and thimble: for their own profit, that is to say, and the discouragement of public gambling.
61} This is hidden malice, implying that the Phaeacian magnates were no better than they should be.
There are no affairs of state to dispose of; and having eaten two or three breakfasts in the course of the morning, the magnates of the valley feel no appetite as yet for dinner.
Few travellers that have visited Canada some thirty years since, in the days of the M'Tavishes, the M'Gillivrays, the M'Kenzies, the Frobishers, and the other magnates of the Northwest, when the company was in all its glory, but must remember the round of feasting and revelry kept up among these hyperborean nabobs.
The Limited whirled the "Constance" into Buffalo and the arms of the New York Central and Hudson River (illustrious magnates with white whiskers and gold charms on their watch-chains boarded her here to talk a little business to Cheyne), who slid her gracefully into Albany, where the Boston and Albany completed the run from tide-water to tide-water - total time, eighty-seven hours and thirty-five minutes, or three days, fifteen hours and one half.
We'll teach these magnates that they cannot ride roughshod over the rights of the commoners, confound them.
Old Acton, who is one of our county magnates, had his house broken into last Monday.
The stupid magnates of this Leghorn government can not understand that so large a steamer as ours could cross the broad Atlantic with no other purpose than to indulge a party of ladies and gentlemen in a pleasure excursion.
aliquoe magnates mulieres, quoe sine scandalo vitari non possunt
In June, after many balls and fetes given by the Polish magnates, by the courtiers, and by the Emperor himself, it occurred to one of the Polish aides-de-camp in attendance that a dinner and ball should be given for the Emperor by his aides-de-camp.