magnet therapy


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magnet therapy

n.
An alternative medical therapy in which the placement of magnets or magnetic devices on the skin is thought to prevent or treat symptoms of disease, especially pain.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are many methods one can try - hypnosis, acupuncture, herbs and supplements, electronic cigarettes, nicotine lollipops and gums, magnet therapy and more.
VuVatech's unique patent-pending approach to bringing relief to sufferers of these conditions uses holistic magnet therapy in combination with a set of vaginal dilators that graduate in size.
Magnet Therapy device linear transducers, control rings (leg and hip) (1)
Although Mesmer was thoroughly discredited, magnet therapy flourished in the U.
Sandy and Marsha Best were explaining the evolution of their magnet therapy products when the familiar one-long, two-short jangle of a long-distance call interrupted their narrative.
She provides publications that address how to select a practitioner, talk with a primary health care provider, evaluate information on the internet, pay for therapies, use CAM with special populations, and use specific therapies like Ayurveda, traditional Chinese medicine, Native American medicine, acupuncture, homeopathy, and naturopathy, as well as dietary supplements, biologically-based therapies like aromatherapy, mind-body medicine like meditation and biofeedback, manipulative and body-based therapies such as Pilates and reflexology, energy-based therapies such as Reiki and magnet therapy, and treatments for specific diseases and conditions, from diabetes to fibromyalgia.
Although their use is generally harmless, people with osteoarthritis should be especially cautious about spending large sums of money on magnet therapy.
Magnet therapy which helped David Beckham heal his famous broken metatarsal in just five weeks before the World Cup played a vital part in Sharon's recovery.
They said that so-called controlled experiments of magnet therapy were "suspect" because it was difficult to blind participants to the presence of a magnet.
They said so-called controlled experiments of magnet therapy were 'suspect' because it was difficult to blind participants to the presence of a magnet.
The professors added: "Extraordinary claims demand extraordinary evidence and patients should be advised that magnet therapy has no proved benefits.