magnifying


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.
Related to magnifying: magnifying glass, Magnifying lens

mag·ni·fy

 (măg′nə-fī′)
v. mag·ni·fied, mag·ni·fy·ing, mag·ni·fies
v.tr.
1.
a. To increase the apparent size of (an object), especially by means of a lens, instrument, or device.
b. To increase the volume of (sound): "Canyons magnified the thunder" (John Vernon).
2. To make more intense or extreme: High winds magnified the danger.
3. To cause to appear greater, more important, or more extreme than is in fact the case: Her mistakes were magnified in the tabloid press. See Synonyms at exaggerate.
4. Archaic To glorify or praise.
v.intr.
To increase or have the power to increase the size or volume of an image or a sound.

[Middle English magnifien, to extol, from Old French magnifier, from Latin magnificāre, from magnificus, magnificent; see magnific.]

magnifying

(ˈmæɡnɪfaɪ)
adj
(General Physics) causing objects to appear larger than they really are
References in classic literature ?
In short, the magnifying influence of fear began to set at naught the calculations of reason, and to render those who should have remembered their manhood, the slaves of the basest passions.
Oftener, however, its credibility rested on the faith of some lonely eye-witness, who beheld the wonder through the coloured, magnifying, and distorted medium of his imagination, and shaped it more distinctly in his after-thought.
It is transparent, as I said before; and being laid upon the printed page, I have sometimes pleased myself with fancying it exerted a magnifying influence.
In fact, Sam considered oratory as his vocation, and never let slip an opportunity of magnifying his office.
He passed a powerful magnifying glass to the foreman.
To see Miss Mowcher standing over him, looking at his rich profusion of brown hair through a large round magnifying glass, which she took out of her pocket, was a most amazing spectacle.
The watch-maker, always poring over a little desk with a magnifying glass at his eye, and always inspected by a group of smock-frocks poring over him through the glass of his shop-window, seemed to be about the only person in the High-street whose trade engaged his attention.
Gertrude keeps a recording angel inside her little head, and it is so full of other people's faults, written in large hand and read through a magnifying glass, that there is no room to enter her own.
This made me reflect upon the fair skins of our English ladies, who appear so beautiful to us, only because they are of our own size, and their defects not to be seen but through a magnifying glass; where we find by experiment that the smoothest and whitest skins look rough, and coarse, and ill-coloured.
But reflect upon this carefully: the purest catholic virtue, with its loving acceptance of all cups, with its pious submission to the will of God, with its belief in the print of the divine finger on the clay of all earthly life, is the mysterious light which glides into the innermost folds of human history, setting them in relief and magnifying them in the eyes of those who still have Faith.
This was because his love, so strange, so new, and so ardent, made him view the infamous and imaginary accusations of Milady de Winter as, through a magnifying glass, one views as frightful monsters atoms in reality imperceptible by the side of an ant.
Command seemed to have lost its charms for him, or rather, he gave way to the most abject despondency, decrying the whole enterprise, magnifying every untoward circumstance, and foreboding nothing but evil.