magnitude


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mag·ni·tude

 (măg′nĭ-to͞od′, -tyo͞od′)
n.
1.
a. Greatness of rank or position: "such duties as were expected of a landowner of his magnitude" (Anthony Powell).
b. Greatness in size or extent: The magnitude of the flood was impossible to comprehend.
c. Greatness in significance or influence: was shocked by the magnitude of the crisis.
2. Astronomy
a. The brightness of a celestial body on a numerical scale for which brighter objects have smaller values. Differences in magnitude are based on a logarithmic scale that matches the response of the human eye to differences in brightness so that a decrease of one magnitude represents an increase in apparent brightness by a factor of 2.512. Also called apparent magnitude.
b. A unit on such a scale of brightness.
3. Mathematics
a. A number assigned to a quantity so that it may be compared with other quantities.
b. A property that can be described by a real number, such as the volume of a sphere or the length of a vector.
4. Geology A measure of the amount of energy released by an earthquake, as indicated on the Richter scale.

[Middle English, from Old French, size, from Latin magnitūdō, greatness, size, from magnus, great; see meg- in Indo-European roots.]

magnitude

(ˈmæɡnɪˌtjuːd)
n
1. relative importance or significance: a problem of the first magnitude.
2. relative size or extent: the magnitude of the explosion.
3. (Mathematics) maths a number assigned to a quantity, such as weight, and used as a basis of comparison for the measurement of similar quantities
4. (Astronomy) astronomy Also called: apparent magnitude the apparent brightness of a celestial body expressed on a numerical scale on which bright stars have a low value. Values are measured by eye (visual magnitude) or more accurately by photometric or photographic methods, and range from –26.7 (the sun), through 1.5 (Sirius), down to about +30. Each integral value represents a brightness 2.512 times greater than the next highest integral value. See also absolute magnitude, visual magnitude
5. (Geological Science) geology Also called: earthquake magnitude a measure of the size of an earthquake based on the quantity of energy released: specified on the Richter scale. See Richter scale
[C14: from Latin magnitūdō size, from magnus great]
ˌmagniˈtudinous adj

mag•ni•tude

(ˈmæg nɪˌtud, -ˌtyud)

n.
1. size; extent; dimensions.
2. great importance or consequence: affairs of magnitude.
3. greatness of size or amount.
4.
a. the brightness of a celestial body as expressed on a logarithmic scale where an increase of 1 equals a reduction in brightness by a factor of 2.512, the sixth magnitude being the dimmest observable with the naked eye.
5. a number characteristic of a quantity and forming a basis for comparison with similar quantities, as length.
Idioms:
of the first magnitude, of greatest significance.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin magnitūdō, derivative, with -tūdō -tude, of magnus large, greatmeg-]

mag·ni·tude

(măg′nĭ-to͞od′)
1. The brightness of a star or another celestial body as seen from the Earth, measured on a numerical scale in which lower numbers mean greater brightness. The dimmest stars visible to the unaided eye have magnitude 6, while the brightest star outside our solar system, Sirius, has magnitude -1.4. The moon has magnitude -12.7, and the sun has magnitude -26.8.
2. A measure of the total amount of energy released by an earthquake, as indicated on the Richter scale.

magnitude

A star’s brightness measured as either absolute magnitude or apparent magnitude. The latter states brightness in the sky on a scale from -26.8 (the Sun, brightest) to +25 (the faintest).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.magnitude - the property of relative size or extent (whether large or small); "they tried to predict the magnitude of the explosion"; "about the magnitude of a small pea"
property - a basic or essential attribute shared by all members of a class; "a study of the physical properties of atomic particles"
absolute magnitude - (astronomy) the magnitude that a star would have if it were viewed from a distance of 10 parsecs (32.62 light years) from the earth
proportion, dimension - magnitude or extent; "a building of vast proportions"
order of magnitude, order - a degree in a continuum of size or quantity; "it was on the order of a mile"; "an explosion of a low order of magnitude"
dimension - the magnitude of something in a particular direction (especially length or width or height)
degree - the seriousness of something (e.g., a burn or crime); "murder in the second degree"; "a second degree burn"
amplitude - greatness of magnitude
multiplicity - the property of being multiple
triplicity - the property of being triple
size - the physical magnitude of something (how big it is); "a wolf is about the size of a large dog"
size - a large magnitude; "he blanched when he saw the size of the bill"; "the only city of any size in that area"
bulk, volume, mass - the property of something that is great in magnitude; "it is cheaper to buy it in bulk"; "he received a mass of correspondence"; "the volume of exports"
muchness - greatness of quantity or measure or extent
intensity, intensity level, strength - the amount of energy transmitted (as by acoustic or electromagnetic radiation); "he adjusted the intensity of the sound"; "they measured the station's signal strength"
amount - the relative magnitude of something with reference to a criterion; "an adequate amount of food for four people"
extent - the distance or area or volume over which something extends; "the vast extent of the desert"; "an orchard of considerable extent"
2.magnitude - a number assigned to the ratio of two quantitiesmagnitude - a number assigned to the ratio of two quantities; two quantities are of the same order of magnitude if one is less than 10 times as large as the other; the number of magnitudes that the quantities differ is specified to within a power of 10
ratio - the relative magnitudes of two quantities (usually expressed as a quotient)
3.magnitude - relative importancemagnitude - relative importance; "a problem of the first magnitude"
extensiveness, largeness - large or extensive in breadth or importance or comprehensiveness; "the might have repercussions of unimaginable largeness"; "the very extensiveness of his power was a temptation to abuse it"
importance - the quality of being important and worthy of note; "the importance of a well-balanced diet"

magnitude

noun
1. importance, consequence, significance, mark, moment, note, weight, proportion, dimension, greatness, grandeur, eminence An operation of this magnitude is going to be difficult.
importance insignificance, triviality, unimportance
2. immensity, size, extent, enormity, strength, volume, vastness, bigness, largeness, hugeness the magnitude of the task confronting them
immensity meanness, smallness
3. intensity, measure, capacity, amplitude a quake with a magnitude exceeding 5

magnitude

noun
1. Great extent, amount, or dimension:
amplitude, bulk, mass, size, volume (often used in plural).
2. The quality or state of being large in amount, extent, or importance:
3. Relative intensity or amount, as of a quality or attribute:
4. The amount of space occupied by something:
dimension, extent, measure, proportion (often used in plural), size.
Translations
جَسامَه، أهميَّهحَجْم، ضَخامَه
důležitostvelikost
størrelsevigtighed
mikilvægistærî, styrkur
ryškis
lielumssvarīgums

magnitude

[ˈmægnɪtjuːd] N
1. (gen) → magnitud f; (= importance) → magnitud f, envergadura f
in operations of this magnitudeen operaciones de esta magnitud or envergadura
2. (Astron) → magnitud f
a star of the first magnitudeuna estrella de primera magnitud

magnitude

[ˈmægnɪtjuːd] n
(= large scale) → ampleur f
an operation of this magnitude → une opération de cette ampleur
They do not recognize the magnitude of the problem → Ils ne réalisent pas l'ampleur du problème. order of magnitude
[earthquake] → magnitude f
(MATHEMATICS)magnitude f

magnitude

n
Ausmaß nt, → Größe f; (= importance)Bedeutung f; I didn’t appreciate the magnitude of the taskich war mir über den Umfang der Aufgabe nicht im Klaren; in operations of this magnitudebei Vorhaben dieser Größenordnung; a matter of the first magnitudeeine Angelegenheit von äußerster Wichtigkeit; a mistake of the first magnitudeein Fehler ersten Ranges; order of magnitudeGrößenordnung f
(Astron) → Größenklasse f

magnitude

[ˈmægnɪtjuːd] n (gen) → vastità f inv, grandezza, ampiezza; (importance) → importanza (Astron) → magnitudine f

magnitude

(ˈmӕgnitjuːd) noun
1. importance. a decision of great magnitude.
2. size. a star of great magnitude.

mag·ni·tude

n. magnitud.
References in classic literature ?
Those acute and long-practised senses, whose powers so often exceed the limits of all ordinary credulity, after having detected the danger, had enabled them to ascertain its magnitude and duration.
At his decease, there is only a vacancy, and a momentary eddy,--very small, as compared with the apparent magnitude of the ingurgitated object,--and a bubble or two, ascending out of the black depth and bursting at the surface.
It was an exceedingly long lay that, indeed; and though from the magnitude of the figure it might at first deceive a landsman, yet the slightest consideration will show that though seven hundred and seventy-seven is a pretty large number, yet, when you come to make a teenth of it, you will then see, I say, that the seven hundred and seventy-seventh part of a farthing is a good deal less than seven hundred and seventy-seven gold doubloons; and so I thought at the time.
Far back on the side of the head, and low down, near the angle of either whale's jaw, if you narrowly search, you will at last see a lashless eye, which you would fancy to be a young colt's eye; so out of all proportion is it to the magnitude of the head.
Haley, accustomed to strike the balance of probabilities between lies of greater or lesser magnitude, thought that it lay in favor of the dirt road aforesaid.
When I converse with the freest of my neighbors, I perceive that, whatever they may say about the magnitude and seriousness of the question, and their regard for the public tranquillity, the long and the short of the matter is, that they cannot spare the protection of the existing government, and they dread the consequences to their property and families of disobedience to it.
To appreciate the full magnitude of this stroke, consider these other figures: the annual expenses of a national government amount to the equivalent of a contribution of three days' average wages of every individual of the population, counting every individual as if he were a man.
I had been looking aloft at the giant show-peaks only as things to be worshiped for their grandeur and magnitude, and their unspeakable grace of form; I looked up at them now, as also things to be conquered and climbed.
I let down the window and looked out; Millcote was behind us; judging by the number of its lights, it seemed a place of considerable magnitude, much larger than Lowton.
Having them shown to him in this way, he tried to say they were fine children, but the words choked themselves, rather than be parties to a lie of such enormous magnitude.
Our friend Waterbrook will excuse me if I forbear to explain myself generally, on account of the magnitude of the interests involved.
It was after three hours' good walking that the servants of Cedric, with their mysterious guide, arrived at a small opening in the forest, in the centre of which grew an oak-tree of enormous magnitude, throwing its twisted branches in every direction.