mahewu


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mahewu

(maˈhewʊ; -ˈxe-)
n
(Cookery) (in South Africa) fermented liquid mealie-meal porridge, used as a stimulant, esp by Black Africans
[from Xhosa amarewu]
References in periodicals archive ?
Instances cited were that once one member realises that his draught power, due to a number of reasons, could not cope with the amount of ploughing to be done or may not have cattle for ploughing therefore he/she brews beer or mahewu and invites those with cattle to help him do the ploughing.
Mahewu is a non-alcoholic fermented beverage consumed traditionally in African nations and Arabian Gulf countries [2].
Fortification of maize mahewu has proved effective in providing dietary iron.
The aim of the study was, therefore, to standardize mahewu fermentation and compare whether fermenting sweet or bitter cassava, the variety of cassava fermented, or the iron compound used for fortification affected the final product.
25 g of starter culture (freeze-dried cassava mahewu previously prepared traditionally), was added and mixed thoroughly.
The schematic flow of cassava mahewu preparation is presented in Figure 1.
Most of these words generally fall into six categories and unsurprisingly tend to refer to local objects or customs (Galle 1991, 17): words referring to the landscape (names of local trees and plants); names of food and drink staples such as sadza (cooked cornmeal), masese (strainings from beer, Dangarembga 1989, 30) and mahewu (a corn-based drink 41,150); names of structures and household items such as dara (a table or stand), whose function is descriptively explained the first time the term is used (11), dagga (a temporary hut 61) or hozi (a permanent grain storage hut or sleeping quarters 123); common expressions such as mauya (glad to see you 35), hezvo (an expression of surprise 35), or makorokoto (congratulations
The problem with beer was easy to take care of: the Salvationists simply started brewing, serving, and requesting mahewu, or ~sweet beer', a non-fermented grain drink.
Ten (18%) of 55 case-patients and 27 (50%) of 54 controls reported consumption of mahewu (matched OR=0.
The findings in Zimbabwe that mahewu was protective suggest that it was less likely to transmit foodborne cholera than other foods available in the community.
Examples of local cereal-based products that have been scientifically studied are ogi and agidi of Nigeria, koko, akasa, and kenkey of Ghana, uji of East Africa, and mahewu of southern Africa.
Several maize based fermented products, such as Ogi in West Africa, Togwa in Tanzania, Banku in Ghana Kenkey in Ghana, mahewu in South Africa, Mawe in Benin have been documented [5], [6], [7], [8], [9], [10], [11].