smoke

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smoke

 (smōk)
n.
1.
a. A mixture of gases and small suspended particles of soot or other solids, resulting from the burning of materials such as wood or coal.
b. A cloud of such gases and suspended particles.
c. A vapor, mist, or fume that resembles this.
2. Something insubstantial, unreal, or transitory: "What everybody echoes or in silence passes by as true to-day may turn out to be falsehood to-morrow, mere smoke of opinion" (Henry David Thoreau).
3.
a. The act of smoking a form of tobacco: went out for a smoke.
b. The duration of this act.
4. Informal Tobacco in a form that can be smoked, especially a cigarette: money to buy smokes.
5. A substance used in warfare to produce a smokescreen.
6. Something used to conceal or obscure.
7. A pale to grayish blue to bluish or dark gray.
8. Baseball Pitches thrown at high velocity; fast balls: threw a lot of smoke in the early innings.
v. smoked, smok·ing, smokes
v.intr.
1.
a. To draw in and exhale smoke from a cigarette, cigar, or pipe: It's forbidden to smoke here.
b. To engage in smoking regularly or habitually: He smoked for years before stopping.
2. To emit smoke or a smokelike substance: chimneys smoking in the cold air.
3. To emit smoke excessively: The station wagon smoked even after the tune-up.
4. Slang
a. To go or proceed at high speed.
b. To play or perform energetically: The band was really smoking in the second set.
v.tr.
1.
a. To draw in and exhale the smoke of (tobacco, for example): I've never smoked a panatela.
b. To do so regularly or habitually: I used to smoke filtered cigarettes.
2. To preserve (meat or fish) by exposure to the aromatic smoke of burning hardwood, usually after pickling in salt or brine.
3.
a. To fumigate (a house, for example).
b. To expose (animals, especially insects) to smoke in order to immobilize or drive away.
4. To expose (glass) to smoke in order to darken or change its color.
5. Slang
a. To kill; murder.
b. To defeat decisively, as in a competition.
6. Baseball To throw (a pitch) at high velocity.
Phrasal Verb:
smoke out
1. To force out of a place of hiding or concealment by or as if by the use of smoke.
2. To detect and bring to public view; expose or reveal: smoke out a scandal.
Idioms:
go up in smoke
1. To be destroyed by fire.
2. To experience complete failure in an attempt to do or achieve something: Our plans to open a bakery went up in smoke when we were unable to secure funding.
smoke and mirrors
Something that deceives or distorts the truth: Your explanation is nothing but smoke and mirrors.

[Middle English, from Old English smoca.]

smok′a·ble, smoke′a·ble adj.

smoke

(sməʊk)
n
1. (Chemistry) the product of combustion, consisting of fine particles of carbon carried by hot gases and air
2. (Chemistry) any cloud of fine particles suspended in a gas
3. (Brewing)
a. the act of smoking tobacco or other substances, esp in a pipe or as a cigarette or cigar
b. the duration of smoking such substances
4. (Brewing) informal
a. a cigarette or cigar
b. a substance for smoking, such as pipe tobacco or marijuana
5. something with no concrete or lasting substance: everything turned to smoke.
6. a thing or condition that obscures
7. (Colours) any of various colours similar to that of smoke, esp a dark grey with a bluish, yellowish, or greenish tinge
8. go up in smoke end up in smoke
a. to come to nothing
b. to burn up vigorously
c. to flare up in anger
vb
9. (intr) to emit smoke or the like, sometimes excessively or in the wrong place
10. (Brewing)
a. to draw in on (a burning cigarette, etc) and exhale the smoke
b. to use tobacco for smoking
11. (Recreational Drugs) (intr) slang to use marijuana for smoking
12. (tr) to bring (oneself) into a specified state by smoking
13. (tr) to subject or expose to smoke
14. (Cookery) (tr) to cure (meat, fish, cheese, etc) by treating with smoke
15. (tr) to fumigate or purify the air of (rooms, etc)
16. (Ceramics) (tr) to darken (glass, etc) by exposure to smoke
17. (intr) slang to move, drive, ride, etc, very fast
18. (tr) obsolete to tease or mock
19. (tr) archaic to suspect or detect
[Old English smoca (n); related to Middle Dutch smieken to emit smoke]
ˈsmokable, ˈsmokeable adj

Smoke

(sməʊk)
n
the Smoke short for Big Smoke

smoke

(smoʊk)

n., v. smoked, smok•ing. n.
1. the visible vapor and gases given off by a burning substance, esp. the mixture of gases and suspended carbon particles resulting from the combustion of wood or other organic matter.
2. something resembling this, as vapor or mist.
3. something unsubstantial, fleeting, or without result.
4. an obscuring condition: the smoke of controversy.
5. an act or spell of smoking something, esp. tobacco.
6. something for smoking, as a cigarette.
7. Physics, Chem. a system of solid particles suspended in a gaseous medium.
8. a bluish or brownish gray.
v.i.
9. to give off or emit smoke, as in burning.
10. to give out smoke offensively or improperly, as a stove.
11. to send forth steam or vapor, dust, or the like.
12. to draw into the mouth and puff out the smoke of tobacco or the like, as from a pipe or cigarette.
13. Slang. to move or travel with great speed.
v.t.
14. to draw into the mouth and puff out the smoke of: to smoke tobacco.
15. to use (a pipe, cigarette, etc.) in this process.
16. to expose to smoke.
17. to fumigate (rooms, furniture, etc.).
18. to cure (meat, fish, etc.) by exposure to smoke.
19. to color or darken by smoke.
20. smoke out,
a. to drive from a refuge by means of smoke.
b. to force into public view or knowledge; expose.
Idioms:
1. blow smoke,
a. to speak deceitfully or misleadingly.
b. to boast; exaggerate.
2. go up in smoke, to terminate without producing a result; be unsuccessful.
[before 1000; (n.) Middle English; Old English smoca, akin to Middle Dutch smoock, Middle High German smouch; (v.) Middle English smoken, Old English smocian]
smok′a•ble, smoke′a•ble, adj.
smoke′less, adj.

smoke

(smōk)
A mixture of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and other gases, usually containing particles of soot or other solids, produced by the burning of carbon-containing materials such as wood or coal.

Smoke

See also fire.

a form of divination involving smoke.
a form of divination involving fire and smoke.
1. the state or condition of being sooty or smoky.
2. soot or smoke. — fuliginous, adj.

smoke


Past participle: smoked
Gerund: smoking

Imperative
smoke
smoke
Present
I smoke
you smoke
he/she/it smokes
we smoke
you smoke
they smoke
Preterite
I smoked
you smoked
he/she/it smoked
we smoked
you smoked
they smoked
Present Continuous
I am smoking
you are smoking
he/she/it is smoking
we are smoking
you are smoking
they are smoking
Present Perfect
I have smoked
you have smoked
he/she/it has smoked
we have smoked
you have smoked
they have smoked
Past Continuous
I was smoking
you were smoking
he/she/it was smoking
we were smoking
you were smoking
they were smoking
Past Perfect
I had smoked
you had smoked
he/she/it had smoked
we had smoked
you had smoked
they had smoked
Future
I will smoke
you will smoke
he/she/it will smoke
we will smoke
you will smoke
they will smoke
Future Perfect
I will have smoked
you will have smoked
he/she/it will have smoked
we will have smoked
you will have smoked
they will have smoked
Future Continuous
I will be smoking
you will be smoking
he/she/it will be smoking
we will be smoking
you will be smoking
they will be smoking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been smoking
you have been smoking
he/she/it has been smoking
we have been smoking
you have been smoking
they have been smoking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been smoking
you will have been smoking
he/she/it will have been smoking
we will have been smoking
you will have been smoking
they will have been smoking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been smoking
you had been smoking
he/she/it had been smoking
we had been smoking
you had been smoking
they had been smoking
Conditional
I would smoke
you would smoke
he/she/it would smoke
we would smoke
you would smoke
they would smoke
Past Conditional
I would have smoked
you would have smoked
he/she/it would have smoked
we would have smoked
you would have smoked
they would have smoked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.smoke - a cloud of fine particles suspended in a gassmoke - a cloud of fine particles suspended in a gas
aerosol - a cloud of solid or liquid particles in a gas
gun smoke - smoke created by the firing of guns
smother - a stifling cloud of smoke
2.smoke - a hot vapor containing fine particles of carbon being produced by combustion; "the fire produced a tower of black smoke that could be seen for miles"
evaporation, vaporisation, vaporization, vapour, vapor - the process of becoming a vapor
3.smoke - an indication of some hidden activity; "with all that smoke there must be a fire somewhere"
indicant, indication - something that serves to indicate or suggest; "an indication of foul play"; "indications of strain"; "symptoms are the prime indicants of disease"
4.smoke - something with no concrete substance; "his dreams all turned to smoke"; "it was just smoke and mirrors"
insubstantiality - lacking substance or reality
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
5.smoke - tobacco leaves that have been made into a cylinder
cigar - a roll of tobacco for smoking
cigaret, cigarette, coffin nail, fag, butt - finely ground tobacco wrapped in paper; for smoking
baccy, tobacco - leaves of the tobacco plant dried and prepared for smoking or ingestion
6.smoke - street names for marijuanasmoke - street names for marijuana    
cannabis, ganja, marihuana, marijuana - the most commonly used illicit drug; considered a soft drug, it consists of the dried leaves of the hemp plant; smoked or chewed for euphoric effect
7.smoke - the act of smoking tobacco or other substancessmoke - the act of smoking tobacco or other substances; "he went outside for a smoke"; "smoking stinks"
breathing, external respiration, respiration, ventilation - the bodily process of inhalation and exhalation; the process of taking in oxygen from inhaled air and releasing carbon dioxide by exhalation
puffing - blowing tobacco smoke out into the air; "they smoked up the room with their ceaseless puffing"
drag, pull, puff - a slow inhalation (as of tobacco smoke); "he took a puff on his pipe"; "he took a drag on his cigarette and expelled the smoke slowly"
8.smoke - (baseball) a pitch thrown with maximum velocitysmoke - (baseball) a pitch thrown with maximum velocity; "he swung late on the fastball"; "he showed batters nothing but smoke"
pitch, delivery - (baseball) the act of throwing a baseball by a pitcher to a batter
slider - a fastball that curves slightly away from the side from which it was thrown
baseball, baseball game - a ball game played with a bat and ball between two teams of nine players; teams take turns at bat trying to score runs; "he played baseball in high school"; "there was a baseball game on every empty lot"; "there was a desire for National League ball in the area"; "play ball!"
Verb1.smoke - inhale and exhale smoke from cigarettes, cigars, pipes; "We never smoked marijuana"; "Do you smoke?"
ingest, consume, have, take in, take - serve oneself to, or consume regularly; "Have another bowl of chicken soup!"; "I don't take sugar in my coffee"
chain-smoke - smoke one cigarette after another; light one cigarette from the preceding one
puff, whiff - smoke and exhale strongly; "puff a cigar"; "whiff a pipe"
inhale - draw deep into the lungs in by breathing; "Clinton smoked marijuana but never inhaled"
2.smoke - emit a cloud of fine particles; "The chimney was fuming"
give out, emit, give off - give off, send forth, or discharge; as of light, heat, or radiation, vapor, etc.; "The ozone layer blocks some harmful rays which the sun emits"

smoke

noun
1. fumes The air was thick with cigarette smoke.
2. cigarette, fag (Brit. informal), ciggie (Brit. informal) Someone went out for a smoke.
verb
1. smoulder, fume, emit smoke The rubble was still smoking.
2. puff on, draw on, inhale, drag on (informal) He didn't argue, he just quietly smoked a cigarette.
3. preserve The fish was being smoked.
go up in smoke come to nothing, vanish, be shattered, be ruined Their dreams had gone up in smoke.
smoke something or someone out detect, find, catch, reveal, discover, expose, disclose, uncover, track down, unmask new technology to smoke out tax evaders
Quotations
"As an example to others, and not that I care for moderation myself, it has always been my rule never to smoke when asleep, and never to refrain from smoking when awake" [Mark Twain 70th birthday speech]
Translations
تَدْخيندُخَّاندُخانيَبْعَثُ الدُّخانيُدَخِّنُ
kouřitkouřkouřeníuditdým
røgrygesmøgrøge
fumo
suitssuitsetama
دود
savutasavusavunharmaasavustaasavut
dimpušiti
dohányzikfüstölfüst
rokok
reykurreykjareykja, ósa, rjúka
煙を出す
연기연기를 뿜다
fumarefumus
be dūmųbedūmisdūmasdūmų detektoriusdūmų uždanga
dūmidūmotkūpinātsmēķēšanasmēķēt
fum
dymdymiťfajčiťúdiť
dimkaditi
rökrökarykacigg
moshi
ควันมีควัน
dumanduman çıkarmakdumanı tütmeksigara/puro içmesigara/puro içmek
bốc khóikhói

smoke

[sməʊk]
A. N
1.humo m
cigarette smokehumo m de cigarrillos
smoke blueazul m grisáceo
smoke greygris m humo
to go up in smoke [building] → quemarse (totalmente); [plans] → quedar en agua de borrajas; [hopes, money] → esfumarse; [future] → malograrse
the (Big) Smoke (Brit) → Londres
smoke and mirrors (esp US) → artificios mpl
there's no smoke without fire; where there's smoke there's firecuando el río suena, piedras or agua lleva
2. (= cigarette) → pitillo m, cigarrillo m, cigarro m
I'm dying for a smoketengo unas ganas locas de fumarme un pitillo or un cigarrillo or un cigarro
to have a smokefumar(se) un pitillo or un cigarrillo or un cigarro
3. (= drugs) → hierba f, maría f
B. VT
1. [+ cigarette, cigar, pipe] → fumar
she smoked 60 a day(se) fumaba 60 al día
she wouldn't let him smoke his pipe (in general) → no le dejaba fumar en pipa; (on one occasion) → no le dejaba fumarse su pipa
2. (Culin) [+ bacon, fish, cheese] → ahumar
C. VI
1. (= emit smoke) → echar humo
the chimney always smokedla chimenea siempre estaba echando humo
the chimney was smoking, so someone was homesalía humo de la chimenea, así que había alguien en casa
2. [person] → fumar
do you smoke?¿fumas?
do you mind if I smoke?¿le importa que fume?
to smoke like a chimneyfumar como un carretero or como una chimenea
D. CPD smoke alarm Ndetector m de humo, alarma f contra incendios
smoke bomb Nbomba f or granada f de humo
smoke detector Ndetector m de humo
smoke ring Nanillo m or aro m de humo
to blow smoke ringshacer anillos or aros de humo
smoke shop N (US) → estanco m
smoke signal Nseñal f de humo
smoke out VT + ADV (lit) [+ animal, demonstrators] → hacer salir con humo (fig) (= expose) → poner al descubierto

smoke

[ˈsməʊk]
n
(= substance) → fumée f
a cloud of smoke → un nuage de fumée
(= act of smoking) to have a smoke → fumer une cigarette
Someone came out for a smoke → Quelqu'un est sorti pour fumer une cigarette.
to go up in smoke (= be destroyed by fire) → brûler; [plans, dreams] → partir en fumée
there's no smoke without fire → il n'y a pas de fumée sans feu
vtfumer
He smokes cigars → Il fume le cigare.
to smoke a cigarette → fumer une cigarette
vi
[person] → fumer
Do you smoke? → Est-ce que vous fumez?
I don't smoke → Je ne fume pas.
[chimney, fire] → fumersmoke alarm smoke detector ndétecteur m de fumée

smoke

n
Rauch m; there’s no smoke without fire, where there’s smoke there’s fire (prov) → wo Rauch ist, da ist auch Feuer (prov); to go up in smokein Rauch (und Flammen) aufgehen; (fig)sich in Wohlgefallen auflösen; (inf: = get angry) → in die Luft gehen (inf); it’s all smoke and mirrors (US) → das ist nur Blendwerk
(inf: = cigarette etc) → was zu rauchen (inf); have you got a smoke?hast du was zu rauchen? (inf); it’s a good smoke, this tobaccodieser Tabak raucht sich gut; smokesGlimmstengel pl (dated inf)
(= act) to have a smokeeine rauchen; I’m dying for a smokeich muss unbedingt eine rauchen; the condemned were allowed a final smokedie Verurteilten durften eine letzte Zigarette rauchen
vt
tobacco, pipe, cigarette, cannabisrauchen
bacon, fish etcräuchern
virauchen; (oil lamp etc)qualmen; to smoke like a chimneywie ein Schlot rauchen; do you mind if I smoke?stört es (Sie), wenn ich rauche?

smoke

:
smoke alarm
nRauchmelder m
smoke bomb
nRauchbombe f

smoke

:
smoke-filled
adj roomverräuchert, verqualmt
smoke-free
adj zonerauchfrei
smoke hood
n (on plane) → Sauerstoffmaske f

smoke

:
smoke ring
n(Rauch)ring m
smokeroom
nRauchsalon m, → Rauchzimmer nt
smoke screen
nNebelwand f, → Rauchvorhang m; (fig)Deckmantel m, → Vorwand m; a smoke of wordsein Schwall mvon Worten; his answer was just a smokeseine Antwort war nur ein Ablenkungsmanöver nt
smoke signal
nRauchzeichen nt
smokestack
nSchornstein m; smoke industriesSchornsteinindustrien pl

smoke

[sməʊk]
1. n
a.fumo
there's no smoke without fire → non c'è fumo senza arrosto
to go up in smoke (house) → andare distrutto/a dalle fiamme (fig) → andare in fumo
b. to have a smoke (cigarette, pipe) → fare una fumatina
2. vt
a. (tobacco) → fumare
b. (bacon, fish, cheese) → affumicare
3. vi (gen) → fumare; (chimney) → fare fumo
do you smoke? → fumi?
smoke out vt + adv (insects) → snidare col fumo

smoke

(sməuk) noun
1. the cloudlike gases and particles of soot given off by something which is burning. Smoke was coming out of the chimney; He puffed cigarette smoke into my face.
2. an act of smoking (a cigarette etc). I came outside for a smoke.
verb
1. to give off smoke.
2. to draw in and puff out the smoke from (a cigarette etc). I don't smoke, but he smokes cigars.
3. to dry, cure, preserve (ham, fish etc) by hanging it in smoke.
smoked adjective
treated with smoke. smoked cheese.
ˈsmokeless adjective
1. allowing no smoke. Our part of the town is a smokeless zone.
2. burning without smoke. smokeless fuel.
ˈsmoker noun
a person who smokes cigarettes etc. When did you become a smoker?; He's a pipe-smoker.
ˈsmoking noun
the habit of smoking cigarettes etc. He has given up cigarette-smoking at last; Smoking can damage your health.
ˈsmoky adjective
1. filled with, or giving out (too much) smoke. The atmosphere in the room was thick and smoky.
2. like smoke in appearance etc.

ˈsmokiness

noun
smoke detector
a device in a building which sounds a fire alarm when smoke passes through it.
ˈsmokescreen noun
1. a cloud of smoke used to conceal the movements of troops etc.
2. something intended to conceal one's activities etc.
go up in smoke
1. to be completely destroyed by fire. The whole house went up in smoke.
2. to vanish very quickly leaving nothing behind. All his plans have gone up in smoke.

smoke

دُخَّان, يُدَخِّنُ kouř, kouřit røg, ryge Rauch, rauchen καπνίζω, καπνός fumar, humear, humo savu, savuta fumée, fumer dim, pušiti fumare, fumo, 煙を出す 연기, 연기를 뿜다 roken, rook røyk, røyke dym, palić fumaça, fumegar, fumo дым, дымить(ся) rök, röka ควัน, มีควัน duman, dumanı tütmek bốc khói, khói 冒烟,

smoke

n. humo;
___ inhalationinhalación de ___;
___ screencortina de ___;
v. fumar;
Do not ___ hereNo fume, no fumes aquí.

smoke

n humo; secondhand tobacco — humo ambiental del tabaco, humo de tabaco de segunda mano; vt, vi fumar
References in periodicals archive ?
Tobacco smoking produces both mainstream smoke, which is drawn through the tobacco column and exits through the mouthpiece during puffing, and environmental, side-stream smoke, which is emitted from the smoldering tobacco between puffs," she said.
Two striking features of these plots are the high maximum breath concentrations measured for the target compounds after each puff and the very rapid decreases in concentration that occurred for each compound in the period immediately after active exposure to the mainstream smoke ended.
It defies common sense to imagine that nonsmokers could be inhaling nearly twice this amount when second-hand smoke is hundreds to thousands of times more dilute than mainstream smoke.
Scientists said that it provides a much more accurate estimate of exposure than using automated cigarette smoking machines to estimate mainstream smoke deliveries, which traditionally have been used.
Ezzati and Kamen (1) correctly add an increment to the estimated personal exposure of smokers in their Kenyan cohort to account for the mass of particulate matter (PM) that is inhaled directly from the mainstream smoke (2).
They analysed the effects of two kinds of cigarette smoke: mainstream smoke, which is smoke actively inhaled by smokers; and sidestream smoke, which is smoke that burns off the end of a cigarette.
People exposed to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) encounter mainly the same compounds as in the mainstream smoke inhaled directly by the smoker, although the concentrations and time patterns differ (2,4).
About 1,200 [micro]g of acrolein are present in the ETS from just one moderate tar-filtered cigarette, versus about 70 [micro]g in the mainstream smoke from the same cigarette (14).
The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) reported a range of benzene values between 12 and 48 [micro]g/ cigarette in mainstream smoke (30).
3R4F is the most commonly used cigarette in COPD research and a comprehensive analysis of its mainstream smoke chemistry has been reported using mass spectrometry (Roemer et al.
The report describes how mainstream smoke and, to a greater extent, sidestream smoke, inhibit the activity of genes that protect the heart and lungs, and activate genes associated with an increased risk of heart disease.