majuscule


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ma·jus·cule

 (mə-jŭs′kyo͞ol, măj′ə-skyo͞ol′)
n.
A large letter, either capital or uncial, used in writing or printing.

[French, from Latin māiusculus, somewhat larger, diminutive of māior, greater; see meg- in Indo-European roots.]

ma·jus′cule, ma·jus′cu·lar (mə-jŭs′kyə-lər) adj.

majuscule

(ˈmædʒəˌskjuːl)
n
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a large letter, either capital or uncial, used in printing or writing
adj
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) relating to, printed, or written in such letters. Compare minuscule
[C18: via French from Latin mājusculus, diminutive of mājor bigger, major]
majuscular adj

ma•jus•cule

(məˈdʒʌs kyul, ˈmædʒ əˌskyul)

adj.
1. written in capital letters or uncials (opposed to minuscule).
n.
2. a capital letter or uncial.
[1720–30; < Latin majuscula (littera) a somewhat bigger (letter)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.majuscule - one of the large alphabetic characters used as the first letter in writing or printing proper names and sometimes for emphasismajuscule - one of the large alphabetic characters used as the first letter in writing or printing proper names and sometimes for emphasis; "printers once kept the type for capitals and for small letters in separate cases; capitals were kept in the upper half of the type case and so became known as upper-case letters"
grapheme, graphic symbol, character - a written symbol that is used to represent speech; "the Greek alphabet has 24 characters"
small capital, small cap - a character having the form of an upper-case letter but the same height as lower-case letters
Adj.1.majuscule - of or relating to a style of writing characterized by somewhat rounded capital letters; 4th to 8th centuries
uppercase - relating to capital letters which were kept in the top half of a compositor's type case; "uppercase letters; X and Y and Z etc"
minuscular, minuscule - of or relating to a small cursive script developed from uncial; 7th to 9th centuries
2.majuscule - uppercase; "capital A"; "great A"; "many medieval manuscripts are in majuscule script"
uppercase - relating to capital letters which were kept in the top half of a compositor's type case; "uppercase letters; X and Y and Z etc"
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Cette premiere finale du circuit majeur des reunions - la seconde etant prevue le 11 septembre a Bruxelles - n'a debouche sur aucune performance majuscule.
There was nothing inevitable or unforeseen, only you, in majuscule, looking up to the gallery and saying hello.
trunculus collected from El Battah and Sidi Salem sites in the gulf of Annaba during 2011 (mean [+ or -] SD; n = 5; for each biomarker and season, values followed by the same letters in minuscule are not significantly different while for each biomarker and site, values followed by the same letters in majuscule are not significantly different at p> 0.
Even so, I prefer "African-Canadian" to "Black Canadian" as a collectivizing phrase, for it is almost always going to be written with the dignity' of majuscule letters.
D'une part, l'emploi d'un vocabulaire plus technique constituait un progres par rapport aux inconstances dans l'emploi des paires droits et loi ou simplement droits et droit, les singufiers souvent marques de la majuscule.
The singular surviving icon of this double transformation is the Book of Kells, its insular majuscule illuminating Epiphany.
Showing that the index and seven songs in the Dijon manuscript were later additions and then claiming that only a certain form of the majuscule E in tenor-voice designations occurs in these added entries and nowhere else, Alden concludes that whenever that particular form of E occurs, the scribe was writing in a later hand that had evolved over some time.
The script used in both texts is insular majuscule and, as is common with the epigraphic use of this script, includes the occasional capital form.
21) La majuscule designera ici la realite historique.
Although I quote two first sentences that conclude conveniently at the end of the quatrain, Wakefield generally tends to enjamb his lines heavily, and the poems are printed without stanza breaks or the conventional majuscule to denote the start of lines, so that nearly all the poems take on the appearance of plain blocks of distilled colloquial talk.
Its layout is typical of the Digby manuscript's poetry, lying in two columns with majuscule letters at the beginning of each line and occasional three- to six-line majuscule letters, which flag the beginning of some of the speeches.
Balzac's is once or twice "the man," while Melville's always bears the designation "the man in cream-colors," without majuscule.