makings


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mak·ing

 (mā′kĭng)
n.
1.
a. The act of one that makes: the making of a cake; the making of excuses.
b. The process of coming into being: trouble in the making.
2. The means of gaining success or realizing potential: That job will be the making of you.
3. Something that is made, especially a quantity made at one time.
4. often makings The abilities or qualities needed for development: You have the makings of a fine teacher.
5. makings
a. The material or ingredients needed for making something: all the makings for an apple pie.
b. Informal The paper and tobacco for rolling a cigarette.

makings

(ˈmeɪkɪŋz)
pl n
1. potentials, qualities, or materials: he had the makings of a leader.
2. slang Also called: rollings the tobacco and cigarette paper used for rolling a cigarette
3. (Banking & Finance) profits; earnings
References in classic literature ?
One ground of objection is the trite topic of the intermixture of powers; some contending that the President ought alone to possess the power of making treaties; others, that it ought to have been exclusively deposited in the Senate.
The subject of instinct might have been worked into the previous chapters; but I have thought that it would be more convenient to treat the subject separately, especially as so wonderful an instinct as that of the hive-bee making its cells will probably have occurred to many readers, as a difficulty sufficient to overthrow my whole theory.
The power of making treaties is an important one, especially as it relates to war, peace, and commerce; and it should not be delegated but in such a mode, and with such precautions, as will afford the highest security that it will be exercised by men the best qualified for the purpose, and in the manner most conducive to the public good.
The doctor (like me) had come in without making the least noise.
Now and then limestone cliffs and promontories advanced upon the river, making picturesque headlands.
As soon as we got the farm work reasonably well started, we directed our next efforts toward the industry of making bricks.
Tumbled into the water, it accordingly is in such cases; the spare coils of box line (mentioned in a preceding chapter) making this feat, in most instances, prudently practicable.
They wished to hold Greece as the Spartans held it, making it free and permitting its laws, and did not succeed.
His hair was a little longer, his hands a little whiter, his shoes a little thinner, his manner a trifle more polished, than that of his soberer mates; indeed the only department of life in which he failed to shine was the making of sufficient money to live upon.
Elizabeth, feeling it incumbent on her to relieve him from so unpleasant a situation, now put herself forward to confirm his account, by mentioning her prior knowledge of it from Charlotte herself; and endeavoured to put a stop to the exclamations of her mother and sisters by the earnestness of her congratulations to Sir William, in which she was readily joined by Jane, and by making a variety of remarks on the happiness that might be expected from the match, the excellent character of Mr.
I am making a little excursion from the Engadine, my dearest of all dear friends.
Not many," said Don Quixote; "not that they are unworthy of it, but because they do not care to accept books and incur the obligation of making the return that seems due to the author's labour and courtesy.