malady

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mal·a·dy

 (măl′ə-dē)
n. pl. mal·a·dies
1. A disease, disorder, or ailment.
2. An unwholesome condition: the malady of discontent.

[Middle English maladie, from Old French, from malade, sick, from Latin male habitus, in poor condition : male, badly; see mel- in Indo-European roots + habitus, past participle of habēre, to hold; see ghabh- in Indo-European roots.]

malady

(ˈmælədɪ)
n, pl -dies
1. (Pathology) any disease or illness
2. any unhealthy, morbid, or desperate condition: a malady of the spirit.
[C13: from Old French, from Vulgar Latin male habitus (unattested) in poor condition, from Latin male badly + habitus, from habēre to have]

mal•a•dy

(ˈmæl ə di)

n., pl. -dies.
1. a disorder or disease of the body.
2. any unhealthy condition or disorder.
[1200–50; < Old French]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.malady - any unwholesome or desperate condition; "what maladies afflict our nation?"
condition, status - a state at a particular time; "a condition (or state) of disrepair"; "the current status of the arms negotiations"
2.malady - impairment of normal physiological function affecting part or all of an organismmalady - impairment of normal physiological function affecting part or all of an organism
condition - an illness, disease, or other medical problem; "a heart condition"; "a skin condition"
health problem, ill health, unhealthiness - a state in which you are unable to function normally and without pain
ague - a fit of shivering or shaking
amyloidosis - a disorder characterized by deposit of amyloid in organs or tissues; often secondary to chronic rheumatoid arthritis or tuberculosis or multiple myeloma
anuresis, anuria - inability to urinate
catastrophic illness - severe illness requiring prolonged hospitalization or recovery; usually involves high costs for hospitals and doctors and medicines
collapse, prostration - an abrupt failure of function or complete physical exhaustion; "the commander's prostration demoralized his men"
bends, caisson disease, decompression sickness, gas embolism, aeroembolism, air embolism - pain resulting from rapid change in pressure
food poisoning, gastrointestinal disorder - illness caused by poisonous or contaminated food
lead poisoning, plumbism, saturnism - toxic condition produced by the absorption of excessive lead into the system
disease - an impairment of health or a condition of abnormal functioning
hypermotility - excessive movement; especially excessive motility of the gastrointestinal tract
indisposition - a slight illness
ozone sickness - illness that can occur to persons exposed to ozone in high-altitude aircraft; characterized by sleepiness and headache and chest pains and itchiness
toxaemia, toxaemia of pregnancy, toxemia, toxemia of pregnancy - an abnormal condition of pregnancy characterized by hypertension and edema and protein in the urine
growth - (pathology) an abnormal proliferation of tissue (as in a tumor)

malady

noun disease, complaint, illness, disorder, sickness, ailment, affliction, infirmity, ill, indisposition, lurgy (informal) He was stricken at twenty-one with a crippling malady.

malady

noun
1. A pathological condition of mind or body:
2. A minor illness, especially one of a temporary nature:
Translations
nemoc
sygdom
sjúkdómur, veikindi
ļaunumsligaslimība
neduhnemoc

malady

[ˈmælədɪ] Nmal m, enfermedad f

malady

nLeiden nt, → Krankheit f; social maladygesellschaftliches Übel

malady

[ˈmælədɪ] n (old) → male m, malattia

malady

(ˈmӕlədi) plural ˈmaladies noun
an illness or disease. He is suffering from some strange malady.

mal·a·dy

n. enfermedad, trastorno, desorden.
References in classic literature ?
Sometimes, indeed, I felt a wish for happiness and thought with melancholy delight of my beloved cousin or longed, with a devouring maladie du pays, to see once more the blue lake and rapid Rhone, that had been so dear to me in early childhood; but my general state of feeling was a torpor in which a prison was as welcome a residence as the divinest scene in nature; and these fits were seldom interrupted but by paroxysms of anguish and despair.
It must be admitted that a permanent gibbet and a pillory, "a justice and a ladder," as they were called in that day, erected side by side in the centre of the pavement, contributed not a little to cause eyes to be turned away from that fatal place, where so many beings full of life and health have agonized; where, fifty years later, that fever of Saint Vallier was destined to have its birth, that terror of the scaffold, the most monstrous of all maladies because it comes not from God, but from man.
Doctors came to see her singly and in consultation, talked much in French, German, and Latin, blamed one another, and prescribed a great variety of medicines for all the diseases known to them, but the simple idea never occurred to any of them that they could not know the disease Natasha was suffering from, as no disease suffered by a live man can be known, for every living person has his own peculiarities and always has his own peculiar, personal, novel, complicated disease, unknown to medicine- not a disease of the lungs, liver, skin, heart, nerves, and so on mentioned in medical books, but a disease consisting of one of the innumerable combinations of the maladies of those organs.
 The superstition that maladies can be cured by royal taction is
In fact, numerous observations made upon fevers, somnambulisms, and other human maladies, seem to prove that the moon does exercise some mysterious influence upon man.
We sat there for half-an-hour, describing to each other our maladies.
This doctor therefore proposed, "that upon the meeting of the senate, certain physicians should attend it the three first days of their sitting, and at the close of each day's debate feel the pulses of every senator; after which, having maturely considered and consulted upon the nature of the several maladies, and the methods of cure, they should on the fourth day return to the senate house, attended by their apothecaries stored with proper medicines; and before the members sat, administer to each of them lenitives, aperitives, abstersives, corrosives, restringents, palliatives, laxatives, cephalalgics, icterics, apophlegmatics, acoustics, as their several cases required; and, according as these medicines should operate, repeat, alter, or omit them, at the next meeting.
Our own experience has corroborated the lessons taught by the examples of other nations; that emergencies of this sort will sometimes arise in all societies, however constituted; that seditions and insurrections are, unhappily, maladies as inseparable from the body politic as tumors and eruptions from the natural body; that the idea of governing at all times by the simple force of law (which we have been told is the only admissible principle of republican government), has no place but in the reveries of those political doctors whose sagacity disdains the admonitions of experimental instruction.
For at production of the vial all gaiety suddenly departs from Porthos and he looks the other way, but if I say I have forgotten to have the vial refilled he skips joyfully, yet thinks he still has a right to a chocolate, and when I remarked disparagingly on this to David he looked so shy that there was revealed to me a picture of a certain lady treating him for youthful maladies.
His mind reverted to the commonplace patients and the discoverable maladies that were waiting for him, with a certain tender regret.
Helena's last whim is to fancy that she has got--the gout, of all the maladies in the world
At first, he was dead of all the diseases that ever were known, and of several bran-new maladies invented with the speed of Light to meet the demand of the occasion.