malady


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mal·a·dy

 (măl′ə-dē)
n. pl. mal·a·dies
1. A disease, disorder, or ailment.
2. An unwholesome condition: the malady of discontent.

[Middle English maladie, from Old French, from malade, sick, from Latin male habitus, in poor condition : male, badly; see mel- in Indo-European roots + habitus, past participle of habēre, to hold; see ghabh- in Indo-European roots.]

malady

(ˈmælədɪ)
n, pl -dies
1. (Pathology) any disease or illness
2. any unhealthy, morbid, or desperate condition: a malady of the spirit.
[C13: from Old French, from Vulgar Latin male habitus (unattested) in poor condition, from Latin male badly + habitus, from habēre to have]

mal•a•dy

(ˈmæl ə di)

n., pl. -dies.
1. a disorder or disease of the body.
2. any unhealthy condition or disorder.
[1200–50; < Old French]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.malady - any unwholesome or desperate condition; "what maladies afflict our nation?"
condition, status - a state at a particular time; "a condition (or state) of disrepair"; "the current status of the arms negotiations"
2.malady - impairment of normal physiological function affecting part or all of an organismmalady - impairment of normal physiological function affecting part or all of an organism
condition - an illness, disease, or other medical problem; "a heart condition"; "a skin condition"
health problem, ill health, unhealthiness - a state in which you are unable to function normally and without pain
ague - a fit of shivering or shaking
amyloidosis - a disorder characterized by deposit of amyloid in organs or tissues; often secondary to chronic rheumatoid arthritis or tuberculosis or multiple myeloma
anuresis, anuria - inability to urinate
catastrophic illness - severe illness requiring prolonged hospitalization or recovery; usually involves high costs for hospitals and doctors and medicines
collapse, prostration - an abrupt failure of function or complete physical exhaustion; "the commander's prostration demoralized his men"
bends, caisson disease, decompression sickness, gas embolism, aeroembolism, air embolism - pain resulting from rapid change in pressure
food poisoning, gastrointestinal disorder - illness caused by poisonous or contaminated food
lead poisoning, plumbism, saturnism - toxic condition produced by the absorption of excessive lead into the system
disease - an impairment of health or a condition of abnormal functioning
hypermotility - excessive movement; especially excessive motility of the gastrointestinal tract
indisposition - a slight illness
ozone sickness - illness that can occur to persons exposed to ozone in high-altitude aircraft; characterized by sleepiness and headache and chest pains and itchiness
toxaemia, toxaemia of pregnancy, toxemia, toxemia of pregnancy - an abnormal condition of pregnancy characterized by hypertension and edema and protein in the urine
growth - (pathology) an abnormal proliferation of tissue (as in a tumor)

malady

noun disease, complaint, illness, disorder, sickness, ailment, affliction, infirmity, ill, indisposition, lurgy (informal) He was stricken at twenty-one with a crippling malady.

malady

noun
1. A pathological condition of mind or body:
2. A minor illness, especially one of a temporary nature:
Translations
nemoc
sygdom
sjúkdómur, veikindi
ļaunumsligaslimība
neduhnemoc

malady

[ˈmælədɪ] Nmal m, enfermedad f

malady

nLeiden nt, → Krankheit f; social maladygesellschaftliches Übel

malady

[ˈmælədɪ] n (old) → male m, malattia

malady

(ˈmӕlədi) plural ˈmaladies noun
an illness or disease. He is suffering from some strange malady.

mal·a·dy

n. enfermedad, trastorno, desorden.
References in classic literature ?
A malady that was formerly cured by the touch of the
But when he had gone into another room, to which the countess hurriedly followed him, he assumed a grave air and thoughtfully shaking his head said that though there was danger, he had hopes of the effect of this last medicine and one must wait and see, that the malady was chiefly mental, but.
I plodded conscientiously through the twenty-six letters, and the only malady I could conclude I had not got was housemaid's knee.
I would e'en take it for sublime, did I not know that the colic is a noisy malady.
The sun (for he keeps very good hours at this time of the year) had been some time retired to rest when Sophia arose greatly refreshed by her sleep; which, short as it was, nothing but her extreme fatigue could have occasioned; for, though she had told her maid, and perhaps herself too, that she was perfectly easy when she left Upton, yet it is certain her mind was a little affected with that malady which is attended with all the restless symptoms of a fever, and is perhaps the very distemper which physicians mean (if they mean anything) by the fever on the spirits.
The writer spoke of acute bodily illness--of a mental disorder which oppressed him--and of an earnest desire to see me, as his best, and indeed his only personal friend, with a view of attempting, by the cheerfulness of my society, some alleviation of his malady.
Because the Romans did in these instances what all prudent princes ought to do, who have to regard not only present troubles, but also future ones, for which they must prepare with every energy, because, when foreseen, it is easy to remedy them; but if you wait until they approach, the medicine is no longer in time because the malady has become incurable; for it happens in this, as the physicians say it happens in hectic fever, that in the beginning of the malady it is easy to cure but difficult to detect, but in the course of time, not having been either detected or treated in the beginning, it becomes easy to detect but difficult to cure.
He examined, therefore, from the depths of his hiding-place, the nature of that mysterious malady which bent and aged more mortally every day a man but lately so full of life and a desire to live.
It is an especially difficult case to deal with, because Miss Burnham's early associations dispose her to attach a superstitious importance to the malady--the hysterical malady as some doctors would call it--from which she suffers.
Whether or not the malady would spread till it reached the heart is the secret of some future chapter.
These horrible chills, which make my teeth chatter and seem to dislocate my bones, begin to pervade my whole frame; in five minutes the malady will reach its height, and in a quarter of an hour there will be nothing left of me but a corpse.
He did not contradict his clever and eloquent counsel, who argued that the brain fever, or inflammation of the brain, was the cause of the crime; clearly proving that this malady had existed long before the murder was perpetrated, and had been brought on by the sufferings of the accused.