malediction


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mal·e·dic·tion

 (măl′ĭ-dĭk′shən)
n.
1.
a. The calling down of a curse.
b. A curse.
2. Slander.

mal′e·dic′to·ry (-dĭk′tə-rē) adj.

malediction

(ˌmælɪˈdɪkʃən)
n
1. the utterance of a curse against someone or something
2. slanderous accusation or comment
[C15: from Latin maledictiō a reviling, from male ill + dīcere to speak]
ˌmaleˈdictive, ˌmaleˈdictory adj

mal•e•dic•tion

(ˌmæl ɪˈdɪk ʃən)

n.
a curse; imprecation.
[1400–50]
mal`e•dic′tive, mal`e•dic′to•ry (-tə ri) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.malediction - the act of calling down a curse that invokes evil (and usually serves as an insult)malediction - the act of calling down a curse that invokes evil (and usually serves as an insult); "he suffered the imprecations of the mob"
curse, execration, condemnation - an appeal to some supernatural power to inflict evil on someone or some group

malediction

noun
A denunciation invoking a wish or threat of evil or injury:
Archaic: malison.
Translations

malediction

[ˌmælɪˈdɪkʃən] Nmaldición f

malediction

nFluch m, → Verwünschung f
References in classic literature ?
When from dark error's subjugation My words of passionate exhortation Had wrenched thy fainting spirit free; And writhing prone in thine affliction Thou didst recall with malediction The vice that had encompassed thee: And when thy slumbering conscience, fretting By recollection's torturing flame, Thou didst reveal the hideous setting Of thy life's current ere I came: When suddenly I saw thee sicken, And weeping, hide thine anguished face, Revolted, maddened, horror-stricken, At memories of foul disgrace.
He searched about in his mind for an ade- quate malediction for the indefinite cause, the thing upon which men turn the words of final blame.
More than eight hundred miles of hard travelling, and many weary days, had it cost them; and the sufferings connected with it rendered it hateful in their remembrance, so that the Canadian voyageurs always spoke of it as "La maudite riviere enragee" - the accursed mad river - thus coupling a malediction with its name.
I have reason to know that a local friend of ours (on whom I beg to bestow a passing but a hearty malediction, with the kind permission of my reverend friend) sneaks to and fro, and dodges up and down.
Five minutes afterwards the piano resounded to the touch of Mademoiselle d'Armilly's fingers, and Mademoiselle Danglars was singing Brabantio's malediction on Desdemona.
If only my malediction is needed for that, I bestow it upon him
I have not enumerated half the vexatious propensities of my pupils, or half the troubles resulting from my heavy responsibilities, for fear of trespassing too much upon the reader's patience; as, perhaps, I have already done; but my design in writing the few last pages was not to amuse, but to benefit those whom it might concern; he that has no interest in such matters will doubtless have skipped them over with a cursory glance, and, perhaps, a malediction against the prolixity of the writer; but if a parent has, therefrom, gathered any useful hint, or an unfortunate governess received thereby the slightest benefit, I am well rewarded for my pains.
She echoed the maledictions that the occupants of the gallery showered on this individual when his lines compelled him to expose his extreme selfishness.
He telleth it always in the third person, making believe he is too modest to glorify himself -- maledictions light upon him, misfortune be his dole
The very devil would be in it in that case," said Sancho; and letting off thirty "ohs," and sixty sighs, and a hundred and twenty maledictions and execrations on whomsoever it was that had brought him there, he raised himself, stopping half-way bent like a Turkish bow without power to bring himself upright, but with all his pains he saddled his ass, who too had gone astray somewhat, yielding to the excessive licence of the day; he next raised up Rocinante, and as for him, had he possessed a tongue to complain with, most assuredly neither Sancho nor his master would have been behind him.
Fogg, he was much more restless, counting and recounting the days passed over, uttering maledictions when the train stopped, and accusing it of sluggishness, and mentally blaming Mr.
Its original owner, for whom it was made, was my great-grandfather, Bramwell Olcott Bartine, a wealthy planter of Colonial Virginia, and as stanch a Tory as ever lay awake nights contriving new kinds of maledictions for the head of Mr.