malefactor

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mal·e·fac·tor

 (măl′ə-făk′tər)
n.
1. One who has committed a crime; a criminal.
2. A wrongdoer or evildoer.

[Middle English malefactour, from Latin malefactor, from malefacere, to do wrong : male, ill; see mel- in Indo-European roots + facere, to do; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]

mal′e·fac′tion (-făk′shən) n.

malefactor

(ˈmælɪˌfæktə)
n
a criminal; wrongdoer
[C15: via Old French from Latin, from malefacere to do evil]
ˈmaleˌfaction n
ˈmaleˌfactress fem n

mal•e•fac•tor

(ˈmæl əˌfæk tər)

n.
1. a person who violates the law; criminal.
2. a person who does evil.
[1400–50; < Latin malefactor=malefac(ere) to act wickedly (see male-, fact) + -tor -tor]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.malefactor - someone who has committed a crime or has been legally convicted of a crimemalefactor - someone who has committed a crime or has been legally convicted of a crime
accessary, accessory - someone who helps another person commit a crime
arsonist, firebug, incendiary - a criminal who illegally sets fire to property
blackmailer, extortioner, extortionist - a criminal who extorts money from someone by threatening to expose embarrassing information about them
bootlegger, moonshiner - someone who makes or sells illegal liquor
briber, suborner - someone who pays (or otherwise incites) you to commit a wrongful act
coconspirator, conspirator, machinator, plotter - a member of a conspiracy
desperado, desperate criminal - a bold outlaw (especially on the American frontier)
fugitive from justice, fugitive - someone who is sought by law officers; someone trying to elude justice
gangster, mobster - a criminal who is a member of gang
highbinder - a corrupt politician
highjacker, hijacker - someone who uses force to take over a vehicle (especially an airplane) in order to reach an alternative destination
hood, hoodlum, punk, strong-armer, thug, toughie, goon, tough - an aggressive and violent young criminal
gaolbird, jail bird, jailbird - a criminal who has been jailed repeatedly
abductor, kidnaper, kidnapper, snatcher - someone who unlawfully seizes and detains a victim (usually for ransom)
mafioso - a member of the Mafia crime syndicate in the United States
gangster's moll, gun moll, moll - the girlfriend of a gangster
liquidator, manslayer, murderer - a criminal who commits homicide (who performs the unlawful premeditated killing of another human being)
principal - (criminal law) any person involved in a criminal offense, regardless of whether the person profits from such involvement
parolee, probationer - someone released on probation or on parole
drug dealer, drug peddler, drug trafficker, peddler, pusher - an unlicensed dealer in illegal drugs
racketeer - someone who commits crimes for profit (especially one who obtains money by fraud or extortion)
raper, rapist - someone who forces another to have sexual intercourse
habitual criminal, recidivist, repeater - someone who is repeatedly arrested for criminal behavior (especially for the same criminal behavior)
scofflaw - one who habitually ignores the law and does not answer court summonses
contrabandist, moon curser, moon-curser, runner, smuggler - someone who imports or exports without paying duties
stealer, thief - a criminal who takes property belonging to someone else with the intention of keeping it or selling it
traitor, treasonist - someone who betrays his country by committing treason
law offender, lawbreaker, violator - someone who violates the law

malefactor

noun
One who commits a crime:
Law: felon.
Translations

malefactor

[ˈmælɪfæktəʳ] N (frm) → malhechor(a) m/f

malefactor

nÜbeltäter(in) m(f), → Missetäter(in) m(f)

malefactor

[ˈmælɪˌfæktəʳ] n (frm) → malfattore m
References in classic literature ?
They were cramped like malefactors with the chain and ball.
I was in the condition of mind to be shocked at nothing: in fact, I was as reckless as some malefactors show themselves at the foot of the gallows.
Baynes had heard much of his host's summary method of dealing out punishment to malefactors great and small who transgressed the laws or customs of his savage little world which lay beyond the outer ramparts of what men are pleased to call frontiers.
Except the malefactors whom we have described, and the diseased or infirm persons, the whole male population of the town, between sixteen years and sixty, were seen in the ranks of the trainband.
The two malefactors are summoned before the master's chair, wherein he sits with the terror of a judge upon his brow.
To destroy our malefactors piece-meal, drying up in their veins, drop by drop, the blood we are too chicken-hearted to shed by a single blow which would at once put a period to their sufferings, is deemed to be infinitely preferable to the old-fashioned punishment of gibbeting--much less annoying to the victim, and more in accordance with the refined spirit of the age; and yet how feeble is all language to describe the horrors we inflict upon these wretches, whom we mason up in the cells of our prisons, and condemn to perpetual solitude in the very heart of our population.
The expedition had been completely successful, and about midnight the sheriff entered the village, at the head of a posse of deputies and constables, in the centre of whom rode, pinioned, four of the malefactors.
He rises and faces the finely wrought figures of the Saviour and the malefactors uplifted upon their crosses behind the altar, and bright with a metallic lustre of many colors.
There were little faces which should have been handsome, darkened with the scowl of sullen, dogged suffering; there was childhood with the light of its eye quenched, its beauty gone, and its helplessness alone remaining; there were vicious-faced boys, brooding, with leaden eyes, like malefactors in a jail; and there were young creatures on whom the sins of their frail parents had descended, weeping even for the mercenary nurses they had known, and lonesome even in their loneliness.
A general amnesty is proclaimed; all malefactors may return to their town.
Clearly then, whenever you see paupers in a State, somewhere in that neighborhood there are hidden away thieves, and cutpurses and robbers of temples, and all sorts of malefactors.
Hodson's whip cracking on the shoulders of the poor little blubbering wretches, and Sir Pitt, seeing that the malefactors were in custody, drove on to the hall.