malevolence


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

ma·lev·o·lence

 (mə-lĕv′ə-ləns)
n.
1. The quality or state of being malevolent.
2. Malevolent behavior.

[Middle English, from Old French malivolence, from Latin malevolentia, from malevolēns, malevolent-, malevolent : male, badly; see mel- in Indo-European roots + volēns, present participle of velle, to want; see wel- in Indo-European roots.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.malevolence - wishing evil to othersmalevolence - wishing evil to others    
hate, hatred - the emotion of intense dislike; a feeling of dislike so strong that it demands action
maleficence - doing or causing evil
malice, maliciousness, spite, spitefulness, venom - feeling a need to see others suffer
vengefulness, vindictiveness - a malevolent desire for revenge
benevolence - disposition to do good
2.malevolence - the quality of threatening evilmalevolence - the quality of threatening evil  
bitchiness, cattiness, nastiness, spite, spitefulness - malevolence by virtue of being malicious or spiteful or nasty
cruelness, cruelty, harshness - the quality of being cruel and causing tension or annoyance
beastliness, meanness - the quality of being deliberately mean
evilness, evil - the quality of being morally wrong in principle or practice; "attempts to explain the origin of evil in the world"

malevolence

noun malice, hate, spite, hatred, nastiness, rancour, ill will, vindictiveness, malignity, spitefulness, vengefulness, maliciousness His actions betrayed a rare streak of malevolence.

malevolence

noun
Translations
سوء القَصْد أو النيَّه
zlá vůle
ondskabsfuldhed
illvilji, meinfÿsni
škodoradosť
hainlikkötü niyet

malevolence

[məˈlevələns] Nmalevolencia f

malevolence

[məˈlevələns] nmalveillance f

malevolence

nBoshaftigkeit f; (of action)Böswilligkeit f; to feel malevolence toward(s) somebodyeinen Groll gegen jdn hegen

malevolence

[məˈlɛvələns] nmalevolenza, malanimo

malevolent

(məˈlevələnt) adjective
wishing evil to others. The wicked old woman gave a malevolent smile.
maˈlevolently adverb
maˈlevolence noun
References in classic literature ?
To his feature as to all other objects, the meteoric light imparted a new expression; or it might well be that the physician was not careful then, as at all other times, to hide the malevolence with which he looked upon his victim.
It is a reasonable and laudable pride which resists such malevolence.
What malevolence you must have to wish to convince me that there is no happiness in the world
They went away by one of the London night coaches, and I know no more about him; except that his malevolence to me at parting was audacious.
If I thought so,'' said Gurth ``if I could but think so but no I saw the javelin was well aimed I heard it whizz through the air with all the wrathful malevolence of him who cast it, and it quivered after it had pitched in the ground, as if with regret for having missed its mark.
What Senor Don Quixote of La Mancha says," observed the curate, "is the truth; for he goes enchanted in this cart, not from any fault or sins of his, but because of the malevolence of those to whom virtue is odious and valour hateful.
As for the accused himself, many remembered him as being so amiable, so handsome, and so liberal, that they chose to think him the victim of some conspiracy, since in this world large fortunes frequently excite the malevolence and jealousy of some unknown enemy.
The old navy in its last days earned a fame that no belittling malevolence dare cavil at.
Juanna Trista remained in Europe long enough to repay, by malevolence and ingratitude, all who had ever done her a good turn; and she then went to join her father in the Isles, exulting in the thought that she should there have slaves, whom, as she said, she could kick and strike at will.
Nor is this to be wondered at: for subject as Christianity is to the assaults of unprincipled foes, we are naturally disposed to regard everything like an exposure of ecclesiastical misconduct as the offspring of malevolence or irreligious feeling.
My original soul seemed, at once, to take its flight from my body and a more than fiendish malevolence, gin-nurtured, thrilled every fibre of my frame.
And this circumstance, while it explains the true motives of Lady Susan's conduct, and removes all the blame which has been so lavished on her, may also convince us how little the general report of anyone ought to be credited; since no character, however upright, can escape the malevolence of slander.