malevolence


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ma·lev·o·lence

 (mə-lĕv′ə-ləns)
n.
1. The quality or state of being malevolent.
2. Malevolent behavior.

[Middle English, from Old French malivolence, from Latin malevolentia, from malevolēns, malevolent-, malevolent : male, badly; see mel- in Indo-European roots + volēns, present participle of velle, to want; see wel- in Indo-European roots.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.malevolence - wishing evil to othersmalevolence - wishing evil to others    
hate, hatred - the emotion of intense dislike; a feeling of dislike so strong that it demands action
maleficence - doing or causing evil
malice, maliciousness, spite, spitefulness, venom - feeling a need to see others suffer
vengefulness, vindictiveness - a malevolent desire for revenge
benevolence - disposition to do good
2.malevolence - the quality of threatening evilmalevolence - the quality of threatening evil  
bitchiness, cattiness, nastiness, spite, spitefulness - malevolence by virtue of being malicious or spiteful or nasty
cruelness, cruelty, harshness - the quality of being cruel and causing tension or annoyance
beastliness, meanness - the quality of being deliberately mean
evilness, evil - the quality of being morally wrong in principle or practice; "attempts to explain the origin of evil in the world"

malevolence

noun malice, hate, spite, hatred, nastiness, rancour, ill will, vindictiveness, malignity, spitefulness, vengefulness, maliciousness His actions betrayed a rare streak of malevolence.

malevolence

noun
Translations
سوء القَصْد أو النيَّه
zlá vůle
ondskabsfuldhed
illvilji, meinfÿsni
škodoradosť
hainlikkötü niyet

malevolence

[məˈlevələns] Nmalevolencia f

malevolence

[məˈlevələns] nmalveillance f

malevolence

nBoshaftigkeit f; (of action)Böswilligkeit f; to feel malevolence toward(s) somebodyeinen Groll gegen jdn hegen

malevolence

[məˈlɛvələns] nmalevolenza, malanimo

malevolent

(məˈlevələnt) adjective
wishing evil to others. The wicked old woman gave a malevolent smile.
maˈlevolently adverb
maˈlevolence noun
References in classic literature ?
The old navy in its last days earned a fame that no belittling malevolence dare cavil at.
And this circumstance, while it explains the true motives of Lady Susan's conduct, and removes all the blame which has been so lavished on her, may also convince us how little the general report of anyone ought to be credited; since no character, however upright, can escape the malevolence of slander.
Here, however, it happened that the ass also found utterance: it said distinctly and with malevolence, Y-E-A.
He could not have said which, if any, of his senses was affected; he felt it rather as a consciousness--a mysterious mental assurance of some overpowering presence--some supernatural malevolence different in kind from the invisible existences that swarmed about him, and superior to them in power.
While he vented the froth of his malevolence in those effusions, he kept a steady eye on two men, who, having disappeared with the rest when the alarm was spread, had since returned, and were now visible in the moonlight, at no great distance, as they walked to and fro, and talked together.
That's her malevolence--that's her malevolence,' returned Mr.
As for the accused himself, many remembered him as being so amiable, so handsome, and so liberal, that they chose to think him the victim of some conspiracy, since in this world large fortunes frequently excite the malevolence and jealousy of some unknown enemy.
The commanders met with polite bows but with secret malevolence in their hearts.
Besides all these views, which to some scrupulous persons may seem to savour too much of malevolence, he had one prospect, which few readers will regard with any great abhorrence.
Speech failed her, and she sat down suddenly on a chair at the table, glaring unutterable malevolence and misery.
He then doggedly demands his other garments, and slowly gets them on, with an appearance of great malevolence towards his late opponent and all the spectators.
To his feature as to all other objects, the meteoric light imparted a new expression; or it might well be that the physician was not careful then, as at all other times, to hide the malevolence with which he looked upon his victim.