malevolent


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ma·lev·o·lent

 (mə-lĕv′ə-lənt)
adj.
1. Having or exhibiting ill will; wishing harm to others; malicious.
2. Having a harmful influence: malevolent stars.

[Latin malevolēns, malevolent-; see malevolence.]

ma·lev′o·lent·ly adv.

malevolent

(məˈlɛvələnt)
adj
1. wishing or appearing to wish evil to others; malicious
2. (Astrology) astrology having an evil influence
[C16: from Latin malevolens, from male ill + volens, present participle of velle to wish]
maˈlevolence n
maˈlevolently adv

ma•lev•o•lent

(məˈlɛv ə lənt)

adj.
1. wishing evil or harm to others; malicious.
2. producing harm or evil; injurious.
[1500–10; < Latin, s. of malevolēns ill-disposed =male- male- + volēns, present participle of velle to want, desire]
ma•lev′o•lence, n.
ma•lev′o•lent•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.malevolent - wishing or appearing to wish evil to othersmalevolent - wishing or appearing to wish evil to others; arising from intense ill will or hatred; "a gossipy malevolent old woman"; "failure made him malevolent toward those who were successful"
malicious - having the nature of or resulting from malice; "malicious gossip"; "took malicious pleasure in...watching me wince"- Rudyard Kipling
2.malevolent - having or exerting a malignant influencemalevolent - having or exerting a malignant influence; "malevolent stars"; "a malefic force"
maleficent - harmful or evil in intent or effect

malevolent

malevolent

adjective
Characterized by intense ill will or spite:
Slang: bitchy.
Translations
سَيِئ القَصْد أو النيَّه، حاقِد
škodolibý
ondskabsfuld
sem óskar öîrum ills, meinfÿsinn
piktavališkaipiktavališkaspiktdžiugiškas
ļaunsnenovīdīgs
škodoradostný

malevolent

[məˈlevələnt] ADJmalévolo

malevolent

[məˈlɛvələnt] adjmalveillant(e)

malevolent

adjboshaft; godsübelwollend; actionböswillig; power, forceböse; fategrausam; presenceunheilvoll

malevolent

[məˈlɛvələnt] adjmalevolo/a

malevolent

(məˈlevələnt) adjective
wishing evil to others. The wicked old woman gave a malevolent smile.
maˈlevolently adverb
maˈlevolence noun
References in classic literature ?
There are malevolent forces," said the Opossum, "which the wise will neither confront nor avoid.
You cannot fail to have heard of certain relations which I have had -- with her majesty the queen-mother; -- the malevolent "
You that are still in the flesh, subject to horrors of the imagination, think what a monstrous fear that must be which seeks in darkness security from malevolent existences of the night.
And, snake-like, amidst the concealing foliage lay the malevolent Russ.
It is as if his heart were corrupted by a malevolent and brooding rancour.
At this period of their Quarrel I entered the Library and was as you may imagine equally offended as Sophia at the ill-grounded accusations of the malevolent and contemptible Macdonald.
The men and women who live and move in that new world of his creation are as varied as life itself; they are kings and beggars, saints and lovers, great captains, poets, painters, musicians, priests and Popes, Jews, gipsies and dervishes, street-girls, princesses, dancers with the wicked [44] witchery of the daughter of Herodias, wives with the devotion of the wife of Brutus, joyous girls and malevolent grey-beards, statesmen, cavaliers, soldiers of humanity, tyrants and bigots, ancient sages and modern spiritualists, heretics, scholars, scoundrels, devotees, rabbis, persons of quality and men of low estate--men and women as multiform as nature or society has made them.
Hooja still harbored ill will against me because of the blow I had struck in Dian's protection, and his malevolent spirit was equal to sacrificing us all that he might be revenged upon me.
Da Souza, excellent wife and mother though she had proved herself to be, had never admired her husband more than when, followed by the malevolent glances of Miss Montressor and her friend, she, with her daughter and Da Souza, re-entered the gates of the Lodge.
I watched her a few moments with a feeling of malevolent gratification; then, moving towards the door, I calmly asked if she had anything more to say.
If a person who prys into the characters of others, with no other design but to discover their faults, and to publish them to the world, deserves the title of a slanderer of the reputations of men, why should not a critic, who reads with the same malevolent view, be as properly stiled the slanderer of the reputation of books?
That there might also prove to be human occupants and that they were of a malevolent character was suggested by the skeleton impaled upon the bamboos, which could not have got there had it not been dropped from above.