malignant


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to malignant: malignant hyperthermia, malignant hypertension, malignant neoplasm, malignant melanoma, malignant tumor, Malignant narcissism

ma·lig·nant

 (mə-lĭg′nənt)
adj.
1. Medicine
a. Tending to metastasize: a malignant tumor.
b. Virulent or threatening to life: a malignant disease.
2. Having or showing ill will; malicious: malignant thoughts.

ma·lig′nant·ly adv.

malignant

(məˈlɪɡnənt)
adj
1. having or showing desire to harm others
2. tending to cause great harm; injurious
3. (Pathology) pathol (of a tumour) uncontrollable or resistant to therapy; rapidly spreading
n
(Historical Terms) history (in the English Civil War) a Parliamentarian term for a royalist1
[C16: from Late Latin malīgnāre to behave spitefully, from Latin malīgnus malign]
maˈlignantly adv

ma•lig•nant

(məˈlɪg nənt)

adj.
1. inclined to cause harm, suffering, or distress.
2. very dangerous or harmful in influence or effect.
3.
a. tending to produce death, as bubonic plague.
b. (of a tumor) characterized by uncontrolled growth; cancerous, invasive, or metastatic.
[1535–45; < Late Latin; see malign, -ant]
ma•lig′nant•ly, adv.

ma·lig·nant

(mə-lĭg′nənt)
Likely to spread or get worse: a malignant tumor.

malignant

Used to describe cancerous growth that will spread to surrounding tissues and, if not totally removed, may be fatal. Compare benign
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.malignant - dangerous to healthmalignant - dangerous to health; characterized by progressive and uncontrolled growth (especially of a tumor)
pathology - the branch of medical science that studies the causes and nature and effects of diseases
benign - not dangerous to health; not recurrent or progressive (especially of a tumor)

malignant

adjective
1. (Medical) uncontrollable, dangerous, evil, fatal, deadly, cancerous, virulent, metastatic, irremediable a malignant breast tumour
2. hostile, harmful, bitter, vicious, destructive, malicious, malign, hurtful, pernicious, malevolent, spiteful, baleful, injurious, inimical, maleficent, of evil intent a malignant minority indulging in crime and violence
hostile kind, friendly, benign, benevolent, amicable, warm-hearted

malignant

adjective
1. Characterized by intense ill will or spite:
Slang: bitchy.
2. Extremely destructive or harmful:
Translations
خَبِيثخَبيث، سَرَطاني، مُهْلِكخَبيث، مُؤْذٍ
zhoubnýmaligníškodlivý
ondartetondskabsfuld
pahanlaatuinenpahansuopapahantahtoinenvahingollinen
zloćudanmaligan
rosszindulatú
illgjarnillkynja
悪意のある
극히 해로운
zhubný
elakartad
เป็นอันตราย
ác tính

malignant

[məˈlɪgnənt] ADJ (= evil) → malvado (Med) → maligno

malignant

[məˈlɪgnənt] adj
[tumour, disease] → malin/igne
(= malicious) [person] → malveillant(e)

malignant

adjbösartig; (Med also) → maligne (spec); effectnegativ; he took a malignant delight in our misfortunesunser Unglück bereitete ihm ein hämisches Vergnügen; a malignant growth (Med, fig) → ein bösartiges Geschwür; malignant melanoma (Med) → malignes Melanom

malignant

[məˈlɪgnənt] adjmaligno/a, malevolo/a (Med) (tumour) → maligno/a

malign

(məˈlain) verb
to say unpleasant things about (someone or something), especially without reason. He's always maligning his wife when she isn't there.
malignant (məˈlignənt) adjective
1. (of people, their actions etc) intending, or intended, to do harm. a malignant remark.
2. (of a tumour, disease etc) likely to become worse and cause death. She died of a malignant tumour.
maˈlignantly adverb

malignant

خَبِيث zhoubný ondartet bösartig κακοήθης maligno pahansuopa malin zloćudan maligno 悪意のある 극히 해로운 schadelijk ondartet złośliwy maligno злокачественный elakartad เป็นอันตราย kötücül ác tính 恶性的

ma·lig·nant

a. maligno-a, pernicioso-a, de efecto destructivo;
neoplasia ___cáncer.

malignant

adj maligno
References in classic literature ?
Heyward turned the instant she gave a direction to his suspicions, and peering just above the ledge which formed the threshold of the open outlet of the cavern, he beheld the malignant, fierce and savage features of Le Renard Subtil.
The Pyncheon of two centuries ago, in common with most of his contemporaries, professed his full belief in spiritual ministrations, although reckoning them chiefly of a malignant character.
Or might it suffice him that every wholesome growth should be converted into something deleterious and malignant at his touch?
But as he sat still for a moment, and as he steadfastly looked into the mate's malignant eye and perceived the stacks of powder-casks heaped up in him and the slow-match silently burning along towards them; as he instinctively saw all this, that strange forbearance and unwillingness to stir up the deeper passionateness in any already ireful being --a repugnance most felt, when felt at all, by really valiant men even when aggrieved --this nameless phantom feeling, gentlemen, stole over Steelkilt.
It turned out that the Jeroboam had a malignant epidemic on board, and that Mayhew, her captain, was fearful of infecting the Pequod's company.
and, with a malignant howl, the woman left the room.
There is much more profanity in America on Sunday than is all in the other six days of the week put together, and it is of a more bitter and malignant character than the week-day profanity, too.
Elinor would not contend, and only replied, "Whoever may have been so detestably your enemy, let them be cheated of their malignant triumph, my dear sister, by seeing how nobly the consciousness of your own innocence and good intentions supports your spirits.
He was moody, too; unaccountably so; I more than once, when sent for to read to him, found him sitting in his library alone, with his head bent on his folded arms; and, when he looked up, a morose, almost a malignant, scowl blackened his features.
Fortunately, the beasts seemed more bent on stretching their paws, and yawning, and flourishing their tails, than devouring me alive; but they would suffer no resurrection, and I was forced to lie till their malignant masters pleased to deliver me: then, hatless and trembling with wrath, I ordered the miscreants to let me out - on their peril to keep me one minute longer - with several incoherent threats of retaliation that, in their indefinite depth of virulency, smacked of King Lear.
Now, I'm not a-going to let myself be run down, Copperfield,' he continued, raising that part of his countenance, where his red eyebrows would have been if he had had any, with malignant triumph,
There was such a malignant enjoyment in her utterance of the last words, and she broke into such a disagreeable laugh, that I was at a loss what to say.