mamey

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ma·mey

 (mä-mā′, -mē′)
n. pl. ma·meys
1. A tree (Mammea americana) of the West Indies and northern South America having glossy leaves, white fragrant flowers, and large edible brown fruit.
2. The fruit of this tree, having firm juicy yellow or orange flesh and toxic seeds. Also called mammee apple.

[Spanish, from Arawak or Taíno.]

mamey

(mæˈmiː) ,

mammee

,

mammee apple

or

mamie

n
1. (Plants) a tropical American tree, Mammea americana, cultivated for its large edible fruits: family Clusiaceae
2. (Plants) the fruit of this tree, having yellow pulp and a red skin
3. (Plants) another name for the marmalade tree
[C16: from Spanish mamey, from Haitian]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mamey - tropical American tree having edible fruit with a leathery rindmamey - tropical American tree having edible fruit with a leathery rind
mamey, mammee apple, mammee - globular or ovoid tropical fruit with thick russet leathery rind and juicy yellow or reddish flesh
genus Mammea, Mammea - American and Asiatic trees having edible one-seeded fruit
fruit tree - tree bearing edible fruit
2.mamey - globular or ovoid tropical fruit with thick russet leathery rind and juicy yellow or reddish flesh
edible fruit - edible reproductive body of a seed plant especially one having sweet flesh
mamey, Mammea americana, mammee apple, mammee tree, mammee - tropical American tree having edible fruit with a leathery rind
References in periodicals archive ?
Different varieties of mameys were harvested as they were available.
The authors evaluated the host status of mamey sapote, Pouteria sapota (Sapotaceae) to Anastrepha obliqua by collecting mature fruits and monitoring them for the emergence of larval Tephritidae.
Key Words: Mamey sapote, Pouteria sapota, Anastrepha, hosts
Se evaluo si el mamey sapote, Pouteria sapota (Sapotaceae) puede ser hospedero de la mosca de las frutas Anastrepha obliqua.
obliqua, does indeed use mamey sapote as a host (Emmart 1933; Stone 1942; Aczel 1950; Oakley 1950; Gonzalez Mendoza 1952; Blanchard 1961; Korytkowski & Ojeda Pena 1970; Weems 1970; Wasbauer 1972; Kandybina 1977; Norrbom & Kim 1988; White & Elson-Harris 1992; Fernandez et al.