mammalogy


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mam·mal·o·gy

 (mă-măl′ə-jē, -mŏl′-)
n.
The branch of zoology that deals with mammals.


mam′ma·log′i·cal (măm′ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
mam·mal′o·gist n.

mammalogy

(mæˈmælədʒɪ)
n
(Zoology) the branch of zoology concerned with the study of mammals
mammalogical adj
mamˈmalogist n

mam•mal•o•gy

(məˈmæl ə dʒi)

n.
the branch of zoology that deals with mammals.
[1825–35]
mam•mal′o•gist, n.

mammalogy

the branch of zoology that studies mammals. — mammalogist, n.
See also: Zoology
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mammalogy - the branch of zoology that studies mammalsmammalogy - the branch of zoology that studies mammals
primatology - the branch of zoology that studies primates
zoological science, zoology - the branch of biology that studies animals
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
1093/jmammal/gyx147) The study appeared online Tuesday in the Journal of Mammalogy, and was coauthored by Philip Kahn from University of California, Berkeley, as well as two students - Connor Burgin from Boise State University, Idaho, and Jocelyn Colella from University of New Mexico, Albuquerque.
Research articles are meant for professionals working in the field of Neotropical mammalogy.
This textbook is for a one-semester graduate or upper-level undergraduate mammalogy course.
Described in the June Journal of Mammalogy, the latest (distant) cousin of an elephant is the smallest sengi yet, weighing in adulthood less than a newborn kitten.
The findings, published in the Journal of Mammalogy, floored scientists, who said the only visible link between an African elephant and the diminutive shrew is its trunk-like nose.
BURTON LIM is assistant curator of Mammalogy in the ROM's Department of Natural History.
The study was published in the Journal of Mammalogy.
A must for libraries with natural history, mammalogy, or illustration holdings.
The specimen was sent to a taxidermist for mounting, and the mount and its associated skull were accessioned into the Houston Museum of Natural Science's (HMNS) Vertebrate Mammalogy collection as catalogued specimen VM 510 on 9 July 2002.
Coyotes living in cities do not ever stray from their mates, and stay with each other until death do them part, according to a study published in the Journal of Mammalogy.
Genetic results confirmed the species -- named Hipposideros griffini -- is genetically distinct, according to the study, published recently in the Journal of Mammalogy.