mammoth


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mammoth
woolly mammoth Mammuthus primigenius

mam·moth

 (măm′əth)
n.
1. Any of various extinct elephants of the genus Mammuthus of the Pliocene, Pleistocene, and Holocene Epochs, having ridged molars and often, as in the woolly mammoth, long tusks and hair.
2. Something that is of great size.
adj.
1. Of enormous size, extent, or amount; huge. See Synonyms at enormous.
2. Of great scope or importance: mammoth expectations.

[Ultimately (perhaps influenced by behemoth) from Russian mamont, mamot, probably from earlier Mansi (Ugric language of western Siberia) *mān-oŋt- : *mān, earth (akin to modern Mansi mā-, earth, as in mā-xar, mammoth (literally, "earth stag")) + *oŋt-, horn (in reference to fossil mammoth tusks).]

mammoth

(ˈmæməθ)
n
1. (Palaeontology) any large extinct elephant of the Pleistocene genus Mammuthus (or Elephas), such as M. primigenius (woolly mammoth), having a hairy coat and long curved tusks
2. (Animals) any large extinct elephant of the Pleistocene genus Mammuthus (or Elephas), such as M. primigenius (woolly mammoth), having a hairy coat and long curved tusks
adj
of gigantic size or importance
[C18: from Russian mamot, from Tatar mamont, perhaps from mamma earth, because of a belief that the animal made burrows]

mam•moth

(ˈmæm əθ)

n.
1. any extinct true elephant of the family Elephantidae, esp. of the Pleistocene genus Mammuthus. Compare mastodon.
2. anything very large.
adj.
3. very large; enormous.
[1690–1700; < Russian mam(m)ot; orig. uncertain]
syn: See gigantic.

mam·moth

(măm′əth)
Any of various extinct elephants of very large size that had long, upwardly curving tusks and thick hair. Mammoths lived throughout the Northern Hemisphere during the Ice Age.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mammoth - any of numerous extinct elephants widely distributed in the Pleistocenemammoth - any of numerous extinct elephants widely distributed in the Pleistocene; extremely large with hairy coats and long upcurved tusks
proboscis, trunk - a long flexible snout as of an elephant
elephant - five-toed pachyderm
genus Mammuthus, Mammuthus - extinct genus: mammoths
Mammuthus primigenius, northern mammoth, woolly mammoth - very hairy mammoth common in colder portions of the northern hemisphere
columbian mammoth, Mammuthus columbi - a variety of mammoth
Archidiskidon imperator, imperial elephant, imperial mammoth - largest known mammoth; of America
Adj.1.mammoth - so exceedingly large or extensive as to suggest a giant or mammoth; "a gigantic redwood"; "gigantic disappointment"; "a mammoth ship"; "a mammoth multinational corporation"
big, large - above average in size or number or quantity or magnitude or extent; "a large city"; "set out for the big city"; "a large sum"; "a big (or large) barn"; "a large family"; "big businesses"; "a big expenditure"; "a large number of newspapers"; "a big group of scientists"; "large areas of the world"

mammoth

adjective colossal, huge, giant, massive, vast, enormous, mighty, immense, titanic, jumbo (informal), gigantic, monumental, mountainous, stellar (informal), prodigious, stupendous, gargantuan, fuck-off (offensive taboo slang), elephantine, ginormous (informal), Brobdingnagian, humongous or humungous (U.S. slang) The mammoth undertaking was completed in 18 months.
little, small, minute, tiny, miniature, trivial, insignificant, diminutive, puny

mammoth

noun
One that is extraordinarily large and powerful:
Slang: whopper.
adjective
Translations
ضَخْممَامُوثماموث، فيل ضَخْمهائِل، ضَخْم
мамут
mamutmamutí
mammutkæmpe
mammuttijättiläiskokoinen
golemmamut
mamut
mammut
gríîarstórmammút
マンモス巨大な
매머드엄청난
mamutas
mamutsmilzīgs
mamutí
mamut
mamutмамут
mammutkolossal
มหึมา
мамонт
khổng lồvoi mamút

mammoth

[ˈmæməθ]
A. N (Zool) → mamut m
B. ADJdescomunal, gigante

mammoth

[ˈmæməθ]
n (= animal) → mammouth m
modif [tusk, skull] → de mammouth
adj (= huge) → colossal(e), monstre
a mammoth task → un travail monstre

mammoth

nMammut nt
adjMammut-; cost, enterprisekolossal; changegewaltig; proportionsriesig; a mammoth taskeine Mammutaufgabe, eine kolossale Aufgabe

mammoth

[ˈmæməθ]
1. nmammut m inv
2. adjcolossale, mostruoso/a, enorme, gigantesco/a

mammoth

(ˈmӕməθ) noun
a large hairy elephant of a kind no longer found living.
adjective
very large (and often very difficult). a mammoth project/task.

mammoth

ضَخْم, مَامُوث mamut, mamutí kæmpe, mammut Mammut, riesig μαμούθ, πελώριος colosal, mamut jättiläiskokoinen, mammutti gigantesque, mammouth golem, mamut gigantesco, mammut マンモス, 巨大な 매머드, 엄청난 mammoet, mammoet- diger, mammut gigantyczny, mamut imenso, mamute гигантский, мамонт kolossal, mammut มหึมา, สัตว์ขนาดใหญ่คล้ายช้างขนยาว งาโค้งยาวสูญพันธุ์ไปแล้ว devasa, mamut khổng lồ, voi mamút 巨大的, 猛犸
References in classic literature ?
This lad will be an honor to his people," said Hawkeye, regarding the trail with as much admiration as a naturalist would expend on the tusk of a mammoth or the rib of a mastodon; "ay, and a thorn in the sides of the Hurons.
Let us now with whatever levers and steam-engines we have at hand, cant over the sperm whale's head, so that it may lie bottom up; then, ascending by a ladder to the summit, have a peep down the mouth; and were it not that the body is now completely separated from it, with a lantern we might descend into the great Kentucky Mammoth Cave of his stomach.
The mammoth grand-stand was clothed in flags, streamers, and rich tapestries, and packed with several acres of small-fry tributary kings, their suites, and the British aristocracy; with our own royal gang in the chief place, and each and every individual a flashing prism of gaudy silks and velvets -- well, I never saw anything to begin with it but a fight between an Upper Mississippi sunset and the aurora borealis.
Amongst us a simpleton, possessed by the demon of hate or cupidity, who has an enemy to destroy, or some near relation to dispose of, goes straight to the grocer's or druggist's, gives a false name, which leads more easily to his detection than his real one, and under the pretext that the rats prevent him from sleeping, purchases five or six grammes of arsenic -- if he is really a cunning fellow, he goes to five or six different druggists or grocers, and thereby becomes only five or six times more easily traced; -- then, when he has acquired his specific, he administers duly to his enemy, or near kinsman, a dose of arsenic which would make a mammoth or mastodon burst, and which, without rhyme or reason, makes his victim utter groans which alarm the entire neighborhood.
caverns of Kentucky = Mammoth Cave; Chimborazo = a 20,500 foot volcano in Ecuador}
His shrieks had brought both his father and herself flying to the hog barn to find him dancing up and down as, frightened and aghast, he vainly attempted to beat off old Dorcas, a mammoth sow, from one of her day-old litter on which, having crushed it by accident, she was now quite deliberately feasting.
Any one of those mammoth low-brows at the door could eat him, armour and all.
The armament of the huge German airships, big as the biggest mammoth liners afloat, was one machine gun that could easily have been packed up on a couple of mules.
My mammoth enemy was so close by this time that I knew I must feel the weight of one of his terrible paws before I could rise, but to my surprise the blow did not fall upon me.
From behind my boulder I threw up the heavy express rifle--a mighty engine of destruction that might bring down a cave bear or a mammoth at a single shot--and let drive at the Sagoth's broad, hairy breast.
A gorgeous, barbaric procession of painted warriors in jewel-studded harness and waving feathers; vicious, squealing thoats caparisoned in rich trappings; far above their heads the long lances of their riders bore fluttering pennons; foot-soldiers swinging easily along the stone pavement, their sandals of zitidar hide giving forth no sound; and at the rear of each utan a train of painted chariots, drawn by mammoth zitidars, carrying the equipment of the company to which they were attached.
I saw a greater number of small lions and tigers, though many of the huge ones still persisted, while the woolly mammoth was more in evidence, as were several varieties of the Labyrinthadonta.