man about town


Also found in: Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.

man about town

n. pl. men about town
A sophisticated, socially active man who frequents fashionable places.

man about town

n
a fashionable sophisticate, esp one in a big city

man′-about`-town′


n.
a sophisticated man who frequents fashionable places.
[1775–85]
Translations
References in classic literature ?
The third draught that I craved from the fount of knowledge was enlightenment concerning the character known as A Man About Town.
But the canvas of my imagination, when it came to limning the Man About Town, was blank.
Come inside, and if there is a Man About Town present I will point him out to you.
Meanwhile, I had moved to sociable chambers within sound of the city clocks, and had lived the life of a lonely man about town, sinking more and more into the comfortable sloth of bachelorhood.
He had been her husband's college friend; was now a journalist, and in no sense a society man or "a man about town," which were, perhaps, some of the reasons she had never met him.
Richard Enfield, his distant kinsman, the well-known man about town.
Before he went to India he was too young to partake of the delightful pleasures of a man about town, and plunged into them on his return with considerable assiduity.
He is in fact an old beau, a regular man about town, "a well-bred, fine gentleman," yet no great scholar, "he spelt like a gentleman and not like a scholar,"* he says.
A man about town might perhaps consider that these influences were not to be felt out of a child's story-book; but when you are among the fields and hedgerows, it is impossible to maintain a consistent superiority to simple natural pleasures.
It is a galling thing,' said Ralph, after a short term of silence, during which he had eyed the sufferer keenly, 'to think that the man about town, the rake, the ROUE, the rook of twenty seasons should be brought to this pass by a mere boy
It is the one book a young man about town should know thoroughly, and it is the best thing in fiction the English have ever done.
He was the keeper of a low den in which I used to lodge in Swandam Lane, where I could every morning emerge as a squalid beggar and in the evenings transform myself into a well-dressed man about town.