mane


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mane

 (mān)
n.
1. The long hair along the top and sides of the neck of certain mammals, such as a horse or a male lion.
2. A long thick growth of hair on a person's head.

[Middle English, from Old English manu.]

mane

(meɪn)
n
1. (Zoology) the long coarse hair that grows from the crest of the neck in such mammals as the lion and horse
2. long thick human hair
[Old English manu; related to Old High German mana, Old Norse mön, and perhaps to Old English mene and Old High German menni necklace]
maned adj
ˈmaneless adj

mane

(meɪn)

n.
1. the long thick hair around or at the back of the neck of some animals, as the horse or lion.
2. long luxuriant hair on the head of a person.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English manu, c. Middle Dutch mane, Old High German mana, Old Norse mǫnmon-]
maned, adj.
mane′less, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mane - long coarse hair growing from the crest of the animal's neckmane - long coarse hair growing from the crest of the animal's neck
encolure - the mane of a horse
king of beasts, lion, Panthera leo - large gregarious predatory feline of Africa and India having a tawny coat with a shaggy mane in the male
hair - a covering for the body (or parts of it) consisting of a dense growth of threadlike structures (as on the human head); helps to prevent heat loss; "he combed his hair"; "each hair consists of layers of dead keratinized cells"
2.mane - growth of hair covering the scalp of a human beingmane - growth of hair covering the scalp of a human being
human, human being, homo, man - any living or extinct member of the family Hominidae characterized by superior intelligence, articulate speech, and erect carriage
hair - a covering for the body (or parts of it) consisting of a dense growth of threadlike structures (as on the human head); helps to prevent heat loss; "he combed his hair"; "each hair consists of layers of dead keratinized cells"

mane

noun head He had a great mane of white hair.
Translations
عُرْف الأسَد أو الفَرَس
hříva
mankeman
harja
sörény
fax, makki
ka»čiai
krēpes
hriva
griva
man

mane

[meɪn] N [of lion, person] → melena f; [of horse] → crin f, crines fpl

mane

[ˈmeɪn] n
[horse] → crinière f
(= hair) [person] → chevelure f abondante
He had a great mane of white hair → Il avait une abondante chevelure blanche.man-eater [ˈmæniːtər] n (= woman) → mante f religieuseman-eating [ˈmæniːtɪŋ] adj [animal] → mangeur/se d'homme

mane

n (lit, fig)Mähne f

mane

[meɪn] ncriniera

mane

(mein) noun
the long hair on the back of the neck of a horse, lion etc. The male of the lion has a mane.
References in classic literature ?
A Mouse ran over his mane and ears and woke him from his slumbers.
Come," said Tarzan suddenly and grasping the lion's mane with his left hand he moved toward the other lions, his companion pacing at his side.
So Ozma clung fast to the mane, and the lion crouched in the path and eyed the swinging mallet carefully until he knew just the instant it would begin to rise in the air.
I haven't the faintest idea," said the Tin Woodman, and the Lion shook his shaggy mane and looked thoughtful.
Under the gleaming icons stood a long invalid chair, and in that chair on snowy-white smooth pillows, evidently freshly changed, Pierre saw- covered to the waist by a bright green quilt- the familiar, majestic figure of his father, Count Bezukhov, with that gray mane of hair above his broad forehead which reminded one of a lion, and the deep characteristically noble wrinkles of his handsome, ruddy face.
The light from the hearth quivered upon the flowers and foliage that were wrought into its oaken back; and the lion's head at the summit seemed almost to move its jaws and shake its mane.
He looked contemplatively at his horse's mane, as if he had some serious cause of dissatisfaction with it, or something else.
The animal was a bright chestnut-sorrel, with cream-colored mane and tail.
Jim accepted it as a mere detail, and at his command the attendants gave his coat a good rubbing, combed his mane and tail, and washed his hoofs and fetlocks.
There, that's about all I know, except look at that mane and tail.
Thus, believers and unbelievers, the learned and the ignorant, alike had their eyes fixed on the doctor, and he became the lion of the day, without knowing that he carried such a mane.
386-401) As a tusked boar, that is fearful for a man to see before him in the glens of a mountain, resolves to fight with the huntsmen and white tusks, turning sideways, while foam flows all round his mouth as he gnashes, and his eyes are like glowing fire, and he bristles the hair on his mane and around his neck -- like him the son of Zeus leaped from his horse-chariot.