manes


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Related to manes: names

Ma·nes

 (mā′nēz)
See Mani.

ma·nes

or Ma·nes  (mā′nēz′, mä′nās′)
pl.n.
1. The spirits of the dead, regarded as minor supernatural powers in ancient Roman religion.
2. (used with a sing. verb) The revered spirit of one who has died.

[Middle English, from Latin mānēs, perhaps from mānis, good; see mā- in Indo-European roots.]

manes

(ˈmɑːneɪz; Latin ˈmɑːnɛs)
(in Roman legend) pl n (sometimes capital)
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) the spirits of the dead, often revered as minor deities
2. (Classical Myth & Legend) (functioning as singular) the shade of a dead person
[C14: from Latin, probably: the good ones, from Old Latin mānus good]

Manes

(ˈmeɪniːz)
n
(Biography) See Mani

ma•nes

(ˈmeɪ niz; Lat. ˈmɑ nɛs)

n. (sometimes cap.)
1. (used with a pl. v.) the spirits of the dead in ancient Roman belief to whom graves were dedicated.
2. (used with a sing. v.) the spirit or shade of a particular dead person.
[1350–1400; < Latin mānēs (pl.); akin to mānus good]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.manes - a Persian prophet who founded Manichaeism (216-276)Manes - a Persian prophet who founded Manichaeism (216-276)
References in classic literature ?
The most positive mandate from him who seemed the acknowledged leader, was liable to be violated at each moment by any rash hand that might choose to sacrifice a victim to the manes of some dead friend or relative.
Comparing the humped herds of whales with the humped herds of buffalo, which, not forty years ago, overspread by tens of thousands the prairies of Illinois and Missouri, and shook their iron manes and scowled with their thunder-clotted brows upon the sites of populous river-capitals, where now the polite broker sells you land at a dollar an inch; in such a comparison an irresistible argument would seem furnished, to show that the hunted whale cannot now escape speedy extinction.
Now they drew near, mad with fury, their manes bristling, and lashing their flanks with their long tails.
They were of Saracen origin, and consequently of Arabian descent; and their fine slender limbs, small fetlocks, thin manes, and easy springy motion, formed a marked contrast with the large-jointed heavy horsastic vows.
I told him, "we had great numbers; that in summer they grazed in the fields, and in winter were kept in houses with hay and oats, where YAHOO servants were employed to rub their skins smooth, comb their manes, pick their feet, serve them with food, and make their beds.
The shape is the same with that of a beautiful horse, exact and nicely proportioned, of a bay colour, with a black tail, which in some provinces is long, in others very short: some have long manes hanging to the ground.
Ali, smiling, repeated the sound, grasped the reins with a firm hand, and spurred his horses, whose beautiful manes floated in the breeze.
They leaped out of the bottomless hole, chariot and all; and there they were, tossing their black manes, flourishing their black tails, and curvetting with every one of their hoofs off the ground at once, close by the spot where Proserpina stood.
They were now bound homewards, to appease the manes of their comrade by these proofs that his death had been revenged, and intended to have scalp-dances and other triumphant rejoicings.
Grand masses of cloud were hurried across the blue, and the great round hills behind the Chase seemed alive with their flying shadows; the sun was hidden for a moment, and then shone out warm again like a recovered joy; the leaves, still green, were tossed off the hedgerow trees by the wind; around the farmhouses there was a sound of clapping doors; the apples fell in the orchards; and the stray horses on the green sides of the lanes and on the common had their manes blown about their faces.
With this he yoked his fleet horses, with hoofs of bronze and manes of glittering gold.
Better had it been for those unfortunate men had they remained with Lewis, and shared his heroic death: as it was, they perished in a more painful and protracted manner, being sacrificed by the natives to the manes of their friends with all the lingering tortures of savage cruelty.