maneuver


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Related to maneuver: maneuverability, manoeuvre, Leopold's maneuver

ma·neu·ver

 (mə-no͞o′vər, -nyo͞o′-)
n.
1.
a. A movement or combination of movements involving skill and dexterity: a gymnastics maneuver.
b. A controlled change in movement or direction of a moving vehicle or vessel, as in the flight path of an aircraft.
2.
a. A strategic or tactical military or naval movement.
b. often maneuvers A large-scale tactical exercise carried out under simulated conditions of war.
3.
a. A skillful or cunning action undertaken to gain an end: "the canny maneuvers of a man after money and ease" (Cynthia Ozick). See Synonyms at wile.
b. The undertaking of such actions: "a skilled diplomat's eye for maneuver" (Garry Wills).
v. ma·neu·vered, ma·neu·ver·ing, ma·neu·vers
v.intr.
1. To make a controlled series of changes in movement or direction toward an objective: maneuvered to get closer to the stage.
2. To carry out a military or naval maneuver.
3. To act with skill or cunning in gaining an end: The opposition maneuvered to force a vote.
v.tr.
1. To move or direct through a series of movements or changes in course: maneuvered the drill into position; maneuvered the car through traffic.
2. To alter the tactical placement of (troops or warships).
3. To manipulate into a desired position or toward a predetermined goal: maneuvered him into signing the contract.

[French manœuvre, from Old French maneuvre, manual work, from Medieval Latin manuopera, from Latin manū operārī, to work by hand : manū, ablative of manus, hand; see man- in Indo-European roots + operārī, to work; see op- in Indo-European roots.]

ma·neu′ver·a·bil′i·ty n.
ma·neu′ver·a·ble adj.
ma·neu′ver·er n.

maneuver

(məˈnuːvə)
n, vb
the usual US spelling of manoeuvre
maˈneuverable adj
maˌneuveraˈbility n
maˈneuverer n
maˈneuvering n

ma•neu•ver

(məˈnu vər)

n.
1. a planned movement of troops, warships, etc.
2. maneuvers, a series of tactical exercises simulating the conditions of war, carried out by large bodies of military or naval personnel, sometimes together.
3. an act or instance of changing the direction of a moving vehicle.
4. a physical movement or procedure, esp. when skillful.
5. a clever or crafty tactic; ploy.
v.t.
6. to change the position of by a maneuver.
7. to position, manipulate, or make by maneuvers: to maneuver one's way across rocks.
8. to steer as required.
v.i.
9. to perform a maneuver or maneuvers.
10. to scheme; intrigue.
Also, esp. Brit., manoeuvre.
[1750–60; < French manoeuvre, Old French manuevre literally, manual labor < Gallo-Romance manūopera]
ma•neu′ver•a•ble, adj.
ma•neu`ver•a•bil′i•ty, n.
ma•neu′ver•er, n.

maneuver

1. A movement to place ships, aircraft, or land forces in a position of advantage over the enemy.
2. A tactical exercise carried out at sea, in the air, on the ground, or on a map in imitation of war.
3. The operation of a ship, aircraft, or vehicle, to cause it to perform desired movements.
4. Employment of forces in the battlespace through movement in combination with fires to achieve a position of advantage in respect to the enemy in order to accomplish the mission. See also mission; operation.

maneuver


Past participle: maneuvered
Gerund: maneuvering

Imperative
maneuver
maneuver
Present
I maneuver
you maneuver
he/she/it maneuvers
we maneuver
you maneuver
they maneuver
Preterite
I maneuvered
you maneuvered
he/she/it maneuvered
we maneuvered
you maneuvered
they maneuvered
Present Continuous
I am maneuvering
you are maneuvering
he/she/it is maneuvering
we are maneuvering
you are maneuvering
they are maneuvering
Present Perfect
I have maneuvered
you have maneuvered
he/she/it has maneuvered
we have maneuvered
you have maneuvered
they have maneuvered
Past Continuous
I was maneuvering
you were maneuvering
he/she/it was maneuvering
we were maneuvering
you were maneuvering
they were maneuvering
Past Perfect
I had maneuvered
you had maneuvered
he/she/it had maneuvered
we had maneuvered
you had maneuvered
they had maneuvered
Future
I will maneuver
you will maneuver
he/she/it will maneuver
we will maneuver
you will maneuver
they will maneuver
Future Perfect
I will have maneuvered
you will have maneuvered
he/she/it will have maneuvered
we will have maneuvered
you will have maneuvered
they will have maneuvered
Future Continuous
I will be maneuvering
you will be maneuvering
he/she/it will be maneuvering
we will be maneuvering
you will be maneuvering
they will be maneuvering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been maneuvering
you have been maneuvering
he/she/it has been maneuvering
we have been maneuvering
you have been maneuvering
they have been maneuvering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been maneuvering
you will have been maneuvering
he/she/it will have been maneuvering
we will have been maneuvering
you will have been maneuvering
they will have been maneuvering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been maneuvering
you had been maneuvering
he/she/it had been maneuvering
we had been maneuvering
you had been maneuvering
they had been maneuvering
Conditional
I would maneuver
you would maneuver
he/she/it would maneuver
we would maneuver
you would maneuver
they would maneuver
Past Conditional
I would have maneuvered
you would have maneuvered
he/she/it would have maneuvered
we would have maneuvered
you would have maneuvered
they would have maneuvered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.maneuver - a military training exercisemaneuver - a military training exercise  
military training - training soldiers in military procedures
military operation, operation - activity by a military or naval force (as a maneuver or campaign); "it was a joint operation of the navy and air force"
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
2.maneuver - a plan for attaining a particular goalmaneuver - a plan for attaining a particular goal
plan of action - a plan for actively doing something
3.maneuver - a deliberate coordinated movement requiring dexterity and skillmaneuver - a deliberate coordinated movement requiring dexterity and skill; "he made a great maneuver"; "the runner was out on a play by the shortstop"
movement, move, motion - the act of changing location from one place to another; "police controlled the motion of the crowd"; "the movement of people from the farms to the cities"; "his move put him directly in my path"
athletic game - a game involving athletic activity
takeaway - the act of taking the ball or puck away from the team on the offense (as by the interception of a pass)
figure - a predetermined set of movements in dancing or skating; "she made the best score on compulsory figures"
completion, pass completion - (American football) a successful forward pass in football
ball hawking - a skillful maneuver in catching balls or in stealing the ball from the opposing team
assist - (sports) the act of enabling another player to make a good play
icing the puck, icing - (ice hockey) the act of shooting the puck from within your own defensive area the length of the rink beyond the opponent's goal
jugglery - the performance of a juggler
obstruction - getting in someone's way
baseball play - (baseball) a play executed by a baseball team
footwork - the manner of using the feet
stroke, shot - (sports) the act of swinging or striking at a ball with a club or racket or bat or cue or hand; "it took two strokes to get out of the bunker"; "a good shot requires good balance and tempo"; "he left me an almost impossible shot"
blitz, linebacker blitzing, safety blitz - (American football) defensive players try to break through the offensive line
trap play, mousetrap - (American football) a play in which a defensive player is allowed to cross the line of scrimmage and then blocked off as the runner goes through the place the lineman vacated
4.maneuver - a move made to gain a tactical end
move - the act of deciding to do something; "he didn't make a move to help"; "his first move was to hire a lawyer"
parking - the act of maneuvering a vehicle into a location where it can be left temporarily
device, gimmick, twist - any clever maneuver; "he would stoop to any device to win a point"; "it was a great sales gimmick"; "a cheap promotions gimmick for greedy businessmen"
feint - any distracting or deceptive maneuver (as a mock attack)
footwork - skillful maneuvering or dealing; "she needs some fancy footwork to cover all those lies"
stratagem, gambit, ploy - a maneuver in a game or conversation
artifice, ruse - a deceptive maneuver (especially to avoid capture)
measure, step - any maneuver made as part of progress toward a goal; "the situation called for strong measures"; "the police took steps to reduce crime"
5.maneuver - an action aimed at evading an opponent
evasion - the act of physically escaping from something (an opponent or a pursuer or an unpleasant situation) by some adroit maneuver
clinch - (boxing) the act of one boxer holding onto the other to avoid being hit and to rest momentarily
airplane maneuver, flight maneuver - a maneuver executed by an aircraft
straight-arm - (American football) the act of warding off a tackler by holding the arm fully extended with the hand against the opponent
Verb1.maneuver - direct the coursemaneuver - direct the course; determine the direction of travelling
dock - maneuver into a dock; "dock the ships"
sheer - cause to sheer; "She sheered her car around the obstacle"
pull over - steer a vehicle to the side of the road; "The car pulled over when the ambulance approached at high speed"
helm - be at or take the helm of; "helm the ship"
crab - direct (an aircraft) into a crosswind
navigate - direct carefully and safely; "He navigated his way to the altar"
stand out - steer away from shore, of ships
starboard - turn to the right, of helms or rudders
conn - conduct or direct the steering of a ship or plane
navigate, pilot - act as the navigator in a car, plane, or vessel and plan, direct, plot the path and position of the conveyance; "Is anyone volunteering to navigate during the trip?"; "Who was navigating the ship during the accident?"
canalise, canalize, channel - direct the flow of; "channel information towards a broad audience"
tree, corner - force a person or an animal into a position from which he cannot escape
park - maneuver a vehicle into a parking space; "Park the car in front of the library"; "Can you park right here?"
control, command - exercise authoritative control or power over; "control the budget"; "Command the military forces"
2.maneuver - act in order to achieve a certain goalmaneuver - act in order to achieve a certain goal; "He maneuvered to get the chairmanship"; "She maneuvered herself into the directorship"
act, move - perform an action, or work out or perform (an action); "think before you act"; "We must move quickly"; "The governor should act on the new energy bill"; "The nanny acted quickly by grabbing the toddler and covering him with a wet towel"
3.maneuver - perform a movement in military or naval tactics in order to secure an advantage in attack or defensemaneuver - perform a movement in military or naval tactics in order to secure an advantage in attack or defense
move, go - have a turn; make one's move in a game; "Can I go now?"
jockey - compete (for an advantage or a position)

maneuver

noun
1. A method of deploying troops and equipment in combat:
2. A calculated change in position:
3. An action calculated to achieve an end:
measure (often used in plural), move, procedure, step, tactic.
4. An indirect, usually cunning means of gaining an end:
Informal: shenanigan, take-in.
verb
1. To go or cause to go from one place to another:
2. To direct the course of carefully:
3. To take clever or cunning steps to achieve one's goals:
Informal: finagle.
Idiom: pull strings.
4. To control to one's own advantage by artful or indirect means:
Translations
manovrimanovro
liikemanööveri
hadgyakorlathadműveletmanővermanőverez
manever

manoeuvre

(American) maneuver (məˈnuːvə) noun
1. a planned movement (of troops, ships, aircraft, vehicles etc). Can you perform all the manoeuvres required by the driving test?
2. a skilful or cunning plan or action. His appointment was the result of many cunning manoeuvres.
verb
to (cause to) perform manoeuvres. She had difficulty manoeuvring her car into the narrow space.

ma·neu·ver

n. maniobra, movimiento preciso hecho con la mano.

maneuver

n maniobra; Heimlich — maniobra de Heimlich; vt, vi maniobrar
References in classic literature ?
This maneuver she repeated several times, to the great amusement of a black-eyed young gentleman lounging in the window of a building opposite.
Edna admired the skill of his maneuver, and avoided any occasion to balk his intentions.
The charge, in that rude species of warfare, consisted merely in pushing from cover to cover, nigher to the enemy; and in this maneuver he was instantly and successfully obeyed.
Finally I took the chase into my own hands; and after that, turn, or twist, or do what he would, he was never able to get behind me again; he found himself always in front at the end of his maneuver.
Powerful people maneuver for position and worry endlessly about who is IN and who is OUT, who is UP and who is DOWN, forgetting those people whose toil and sweat sends us here and paves our way.
This maneuver gave me a considerable advantage, and I was able to reach the city quite a bit ahead of him, and as he came tearing after me I jumped for a window about thirty feet from the ground in the face of one of the buildings overlooking the valley.
Denis--a strategic maneuver which, having been executed with equal punctuality, was crowned with the most fortunate results.
This done, their mock fury sank into a calm, and the chief, approaching the captain, who had remained warily drawn up, though informed of the pacific nature of the maneuver, extended to him the hand of friendship.
Madame followed, with an anxiety almost equal to that of the prince, every maneuver of her august husband.
I forget what reply I made to this, but I grant that in my heart I thought the old woman capable of any weird maneuver.
The maneuver was accomplished more easily than he had hoped, for the stupid beast, not knowing what Tarzan was attempting, made no particular effort to prevent the accomplishment of the design.
Happily for Mary Datchet she returned to the office to find that by some obscure Parliamentary maneuver the vote had once more slipped beyond the attainment of women.