manger


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Related to manger: manager, dog in the manger

man·ger

 (mān′jər)
n.
A trough or an open box in which feed for livestock is placed.

[Middle English, from Old French mangeoire, from mangier, to eat, from Latin mandūcāre, from mandūcō, glutton, from mandere, to chew.]

manger

(ˈmeɪndʒə)
n
1. (Agriculture) a trough or box in a stable, barn, etc, from which horses or cattle feed
2. (Nautical Terms) nautical a basin-like construction in the bows of a vessel for catching water draining from an anchor rode or coming in through the hawseholes
[C14: from Old French maingeure food trough, from mangier to eat, ultimately from Latin mandūcāre to chew]

man•ger

(ˈmeɪn dʒər)

n.
a box or trough in a stable or barn from which livestock eat.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Old French mangëure, mainjure, derivative, with -ure -ure, of mangier to eat < Latin mandūcāre to chew, eat, v. derivative of mandūcus a gluttonous figure in farce]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.manger - a container (usually in a barn or stable) from which cattle or horses feedmanger - a container (usually in a barn or stable) from which cattle or horses feed
bunk, feed bunk - a long trough for feeding cattle
container - any object that can be used to hold things (especially a large metal boxlike object of standardized dimensions that can be loaded from one form of transport to another)

manger

noun trough, feeder, crib All the feed went into one manger.
Translations
مِذْوَد، مَعْلَف الدّابَّه
žlab
krybbe
jata
sile
válov
yemlik
馬槽马槽

manger

[ˈmeɪndʒəʳ] Npesebre m

manger

[ˈmeɪndʒər] n (= food trough) → mangeoire f

manger

nKrippe f

manger

[ˈmeɪndʒəʳ] nmangiatoia

manger

(ˈmeindʒə) noun
a box or trough in which food for horses and cattle is placed.
References in classic literature ?
The company assembled in the long salle a manger that evening was such as one sees nowhere but on the Continent.
There was a bleeding heart, in tufts of paper lace; there were the three kings, gorgeously apparelled, and the ox and the ass and the shepherds; there was the Baby in the manger, and a group of angels, singing; there were camels and leopards, held by the black slaves of the three kings.
The first stall was a large square one, shut in behind with a wooden gate; the others were common stalls, good stalls, but not nearly so large; it had a low rack for hay and a low manger for corn; it was called a loose box, because the horse that was put into it was not tied up, but left loose, to do as he liked.
You are a dog in the manger, Cathy, and desire no one to be loved but yourself
The horse made me a sign to go in first; it was a large room with a smooth clay floor, and a rack and manger, extending the whole length on one side.
The instant they entered Don Quixote asked the landlord after the man with the lances and halberds, and was told that he was in the stable seeing to his mule; which was what Sancho and the cousin proceeded to do for their beasts, giving the best manger and the best place in the stable to Rocinante.
A horse slips and injures a joint; a horse stumbles and breaks his knees to the bone; a horse eats out of a manger in which a glandered horse has eaten.
He found his horse and that of Porthos fastened to the manger, but to an empty manger.
Adrienne went through the ante-chamber, which served also as a salle a manger, and passed a small saloon, into the bed-chamber of her parent.
For he was a regular dog in the manger, was Tackleton; and when they laughed and he couldn't, he took it into his head, immediately, that they must be laughing at him.
A Dog looking out for its afternoon nap jumped into the Manger of an Ox and lay there cosily upon the straw.
nimbus, but an ass nibbling hay from the sacred manger is similarly