maniac


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ma·ni·ac

 (mā′nē-ăk′)
n.
1. A psychotic or otherwise mentally ill person who exhibits violent or bizarre behavior. Not used in psychiatric diagnosis.
2. A person who has an excessive enthusiasm or desire for something: a sports maniac.
3. A person who acts in a wildly irresponsible way: maniacs on the highway.
adj.
Variant of maniacal.

[From Late Latin maniacus, maniacal, from Greek maniakos, from maniā, madness; see men- in Indo-European roots.]

maniac

(ˈmeɪnɪˌæk)
n
1. a wild disorderly person
2. a person who has a great craving or enthusiasm for something: a football maniac.
3. (Psychiatry) psychiatry obsolete a person afflicted with mania
[C17: from Late Latin maniacus belonging to madness, from Greek]

ma•ni•ac

(ˈmeɪ niˌæk)

n.
1. an insane person; lunatic.
2. an overly zealous or enthusiastic person.
adj.
[1595–1605; < Late Latin maniacus possessed by mania < Late Greek maniakós. See mania, -ac]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.maniac - an insane person
crazy, looney, loony, nutcase, weirdo - someone deranged and possibly dangerous
bedlamite - an archaic term for a lunatic
pyromaniac - a person with a mania for setting things on fire
madwoman - a woman lunatic
diseased person, sick person, sufferer - a person suffering from an illness
2.maniac - a person who has an obsession with or excessive enthusiasm for something
fancier, enthusiast - a person having a strong liking for something
Adj.1.maniac - wildly disorderedmaniac - wildly disordered; "a maniacal frenzy"
insane - afflicted with or characteristic of mental derangement; "was declared insane"; "insane laughter"

maniac

noun
1. madman or madwoman, psycho (slang), lunatic, loony (slang), psychopath, nutter (Brit. slang), basket case (slang), nutcase (slang), headcase (informal), headbanger (informal) a drug-crazed maniac
2. fanatic, fan, enthusiast, freak (informal), fiend (informal) big spending football maniacs

maniac

noun
A person who is ardently devoted to a particular subject or activity:
Informal: buff, fan, fiend.
Slang: freak, nut.
adjective
Afflicted with or exhibiting irrationality and mental unsoundness:
Informal: bonkers, cracked, daffy, gaga, loony.
Chiefly British: crackers.
Idioms: around the bend, crazy as a loon, mad as a hatter, not all there, nutty as a fruitcake, off one's head, off one's rocker, of unsound mind, out of one's mind, sick in the head, stark raving mad.
Translations
مَجْنُونمَجْنون، مَهْووس
maniak
vanvittig person
maanikkoraivohullu
מניאקמשוגע
manijak
dühöngõ õrült
brjálæîingur
狂人
미치광이
maniak
vettvilling
คนคลั่ง
manyakmanyak kimse
người điên

maniac

[ˈmeɪnɪæk]
A. ADJmaníaco
B. N
1.maníaco/a m/f
he drives like a maniacconduce como un loco
2. (fig) (= enthusiast) → fanático/a m/f, maniático/a m/f
these sports maniacsestos fanáticos or maniáticos del deporte

maniac

[ˈmeɪniæk] n
(= mad person) → maniaque mf
She was attacked by a maniac with a knife → Elle a été agressée par un maniaque avec un couteau.
He drives like a maniac
BUT Il conduit comme un fou.
I worked like a maniac
BUT J'ai travaillé comme un dingue.
(= fanatic) a religious maniac → un(e) fanatique religieux/euse
a baseball maniac → un(e) mordu(e) du base-ball

maniac

adjwahnsinnig
n
Wahnsinnige(r) mf, → Irre(r) mf
(fig) these sports maniacsdiese Sportfanatiker pl; you maniacdu bist ja wahnsinnig!

maniac

[ˈmeɪnɪæk] nmaniaco/a
sports maniac (fig) (fam) → maniaco/a dello sport
he drives like a maniac! → guida come un pazzo!

mania

(ˈmeiniə) noun
1. a form of mental illness in which the sufferer is over-active, over-excited, and unreasonably happy.
2. an unreasonable enthusiasm for something. He has a mania for fast cars.
ˈmaniac (-ӕk) noun
an insane (and dangerous) person; a madman. He drives like a maniac.
manic (ˈmӕnik) adjective
1. of, or suffering from, mania. She's in a manic state.
2. extremely energetic, active and excited. The new manager is one of those manic people who can't rest even for a minute.

maniac

مَجْنُون maniak vanvittig person Verrückter μανιακός maníaco raivohullu dingue manijak folle 狂人 미치광이 maniak gærning maniak maníaco маньяк vettvilling คนคลั่ง manyak người điên 疯子

ma·ni·ac

a. maníaco-a, persona afectada de manía.
References in classic literature ?
In the cell next to him was a drunken wife-beater and in the one beyond a yelling maniac.
How shall he ever know well that he is and does as an officer of the government, or as a man, until he is obliged to consider whether he will treat me, his neighbor, for whom he has respect, as a neighbor and well-disposed man, or as a maniac and disturber of the peace, and see if he can get over this obstruction to his neighborlines without a ruder and more impetuous thought or speech corresponding with his action.
The maniac bellowed: she parted her shaggy locks from her visage, and gazed wildly at her visitors.
The maniac figure of the Saxon Ulrica was for a long time visible on the lofty stand she had chosen, tossing her arms abroad with wild exultation, as if she reined empress of the conflagration which she had raised.
Have I not told thee," answered Don Quixote, "that I mean to imitate Amadis here, playing the victim of despair, the madman, the maniac, so as at the same time to imitate the valiant Don Roland, when at the fountain he had evidence of the fair Angelica having disgraced herself with Medoro and through grief thereat went mad, and plucked up trees, troubled the waters of the clear springs, slew destroyed flocks, burned down huts, levelled houses, dragged mares after him, and perpetrated a hundred thousand other outrages worthy of everlasting renown and record?
But to conquer those obstacles which bristled round the South Pole, rendering it more inaccessible than the North, which had not yet been reached by the boldest navigators--was it not a mad enterprise, one which only a maniac would have conceived?
She traversed her chamber with the excitement of a furious maniac or of a tigress shut up in an iron cage.
A madman," I said, "has done this deed - some raving maniac, escaped from a neighboring Maison de Santé.
As to making a bolt of it upstairs there was the same objection; and to allow ourselves to be chased all over the empty house by this maniac would have been mere folly.
Because he wore a toy sword and happened to know how to use it, you want us to believe he used it like a bloodthirsty maniac for no reason in the world.
The doctor most kindly took charge of me, and it was well he did so, for I had a fit in the station, and before we reached home I was practically a raving maniac.
Muscari was in towering spirits, seriously believing in the peril, and his talk to Ethel might well have made her think him a maniac.