mantle


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Related to mantle: Mickey Mantle, upper mantle
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mantle
cutaway of the earth

man·tle

 (măn′tl)
n.
1. A loose sleeveless coat worn over outer garments; a cloak.
2. Something that covers, envelops, or conceals: "On a summer night ... a mantle of dust hangs over the gravel roads" (John Dollard).
3. The role or appearance of an authoritative or important person: "a Carlylean conviction that in modern society a poet was obligated to assume the mantle of a prophet" (Richard D. Altick).
4. Variant of mantel.
5. The outer covering of a wall.
6. A zone of hot gases around a flame.
7. A device in gas lamps consisting of a sheath of threads that gives off brilliant illumination when heated by the flame.
8. Anatomy The cerebral cortex.
9. Geology The zone of the earth between the crust and the core.
10. The outer wall and casing of a blast furnace above the hearth.
11. The shoulder feathers, upper back, and sometimes the wings of a bird when differently colored from the rest of the body.
12.
a. A fold or pair of folds of the body wall that covers the internal organs and typically secretes the substance that forms the shell in mollusks and brachiopods.
b. The soft outer wall lining the shell of a tunicate or barnacle.
v. man·tled, man·tling, man·tles
v.tr.
1. To cover with a mantle.
2. To cover with something that acts like a mantle; cover, envelop, or conceal: "when the land was mantled in forest and prowled by lions, leopards, and wolves" (David Campbell).
v.intr.
1. To spread or become extended over a surface.
2. To become covered with a coating, as scum or froth on the surface of a liquid.
3. To blush: cheeks mantling with embarrassment.

[Middle English, from Old English mentel and from Old French mantel, both from Latin mantellum.]

mantle

(ˈmæntəl)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) archaic a loose wrap or cloak
2. such a garment regarded as a symbol of someone's power or authority: he assumed his father's mantle.
3. anything that covers completely or envelops: a mantle of snow.
4. (General Engineering) a small dome-shaped or cylindrical mesh impregnated with cerium or thorium nitrates, used to increase illumination in a gas or oil lamp
5. (Zoology) zoology
a. a protective layer of epidermis in molluscs that secretes a substance forming the shell
b. a similar structure in brachiopods
6. (Zoology) ornithol the feathers of the folded wings and back, esp when these are of a different colour from the remaining feathers
7. (Geological Science) geology the part of the earth between the crust and the core, accounting for more than 82% of the earth's volume (but only 68% of its mass) and thought to be composed largely of peridotite. See also asthenosphere
8. (Architecture) a less common spelling of mantel
9. (Anatomy) anatomy another word for pallium3
10. (Art Terms) a clay mould formed around a wax model which is subsequently melted out
vb
11. (tr) to envelop or supply with a mantle
12. to spread over or become spread over: the trees were mantled with snow.
13. (tr) (of the face, cheeks) to become suffused with blood; flush
14. (Falconry) (intr) falconry (of a hawk or falcon) to spread the wings and tail over food
[C13: via Old French from Latin mantellum, diminutive of mantum cloak]

man•tle

(ˈmæn tl)

n., v. -tled, -tling. n.
1. a long, loose, capelike garment; sleeveless cloak.
2. something that covers, envelops, or conceals: the mantle of darkness.
3. the portion of the earth, about 1800 mi. (2900 km) thick, between the crust and the core.
4. an outgrowth of the body wall in mollusks and brachiopods that lines the inner surface of the shell valves and secretes a shell-forming substance.
5. an incombustible hood that becomes incandescent and gives off a brilliant light when placed around a flame.
6. the back, scapular, and inner wing plumage of a bird.
7. mantel.
v.t.
8. to cover with or as if with a mantle; envelop; conceal.
v.i.
9. to overspread a surface.
10. to flush; blush.
11. to become covered with a coating, as foam.
[1200–50; Middle English mantel < Anglo-French, Old French mantel < Latin mantellum cloak]

Man•tle

(ˈmæn tl)

n.
Mickey (Charles), 1931–95, U.S. baseball player.

man·tle

(măn′tl)
1. The layer of the Earth between the crust and the core. It consists mainly of silicate minerals and has an upper, partially molten part and a lower, solid part. The upper mantle is the source of magma and volcanic lava.
2. The layer of soft tissue that covers the body of a clam, oyster, or other mollusk and secretes the material that forms the shell.

Mantle

 a covering; a quantity of furs of 30 to 100, depending on the size of the skins.
Examples: mantle of darkness; of fox skins, 1545; of furs, 1490; of ivy, 1829; of meekness, 1526; of deep obscurity, 1526; of prudence, 1430; of silence; of skins; of snow; of white kid, 1549.

mantle


Past participle: mantled
Gerund: mantling

Imperative
mantle
mantle
Present
I mantle
you mantle
he/she/it mantles
we mantle
you mantle
they mantle
Preterite
I mantled
you mantled
he/she/it mantled
we mantled
you mantled
they mantled
Present Continuous
I am mantling
you are mantling
he/she/it is mantling
we are mantling
you are mantling
they are mantling
Present Perfect
I have mantled
you have mantled
he/she/it has mantled
we have mantled
you have mantled
they have mantled
Past Continuous
I was mantling
you were mantling
he/she/it was mantling
we were mantling
you were mantling
they were mantling
Past Perfect
I had mantled
you had mantled
he/she/it had mantled
we had mantled
you had mantled
they had mantled
Future
I will mantle
you will mantle
he/she/it will mantle
we will mantle
you will mantle
they will mantle
Future Perfect
I will have mantled
you will have mantled
he/she/it will have mantled
we will have mantled
you will have mantled
they will have mantled
Future Continuous
I will be mantling
you will be mantling
he/she/it will be mantling
we will be mantling
you will be mantling
they will be mantling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been mantling
you have been mantling
he/she/it has been mantling
we have been mantling
you have been mantling
they have been mantling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been mantling
you will have been mantling
he/she/it will have been mantling
we will have been mantling
you will have been mantling
they will have been mantling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been mantling
you had been mantling
he/she/it had been mantling
we had been mantling
you had been mantling
they had been mantling
Conditional
I would mantle
you would mantle
he/she/it would mantle
we would mantle
you would mantle
they would mantle
Past Conditional
I would have mantled
you would have mantled
he/she/it would have mantled
we would have mantled
you would have mantled
they would have mantled

mantle


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1. A clay mold around a wax model.
2. The dense, hot rock layer, 1800 mi (2900 km) thick, below the crust. Some parts of it are semi-molten and able to flow.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mantle - the cloak as a symbol of authoritymantle - the cloak as a symbol of authority; "place the mantle of authority on younger shoulders"
symbol - an arbitrary sign (written or printed) that has acquired a conventional significance
2.mantle - United States baseball player (1931-1997)Mantle - United States baseball player (1931-1997)
3.mantle - the layer of the earth between the crust and the core
layer - a relatively thin sheetlike expanse or region lying over or under another
geosphere, lithosphere - the solid part of the earth consisting of the crust and outer mantle
lower mantle - the deeper part of the mantle
upper mantle - the upper part of the mantle
4.mantle - anything that coversmantle - anything that covers; "there was a blanket of snow"
covering, natural covering, cover - a natural object that covers or envelops; "under a covering of dust"; "the fox was flushed from its cover"
5.mantle - (zoology) a protective layer of epidermis in mollusks or brachiopods that secretes a substance forming the shell
epidermis, cuticle - the outer layer of the skin covering the exterior body surface of vertebrates
zoological science, zoology - the branch of biology that studies animals
6.mantle - shelf that projects from wall above fireplacemantle - shelf that projects from wall above fireplace; "in Britain they call a mantel a chimneypiece"
fireplace, hearth, open fireplace - an open recess in a wall at the base of a chimney where a fire can be built; "the fireplace was so large you could walk inside it"; "he laid a fire in the hearth and lit it"; "the hearth was black with the charcoal of many fires"
shelf - a support that consists of a horizontal surface for holding objects
7.mantle - hanging cloth used as a blind (especially for a window)mantle - hanging cloth used as a blind (especially for a window)
screen, blind - a protective covering that keeps things out or hinders sight; "they had just moved in and had not put up blinds yet"
drop cloth, drop curtain, drop - a curtain that can be lowered and raised onto a stage from the flies; often used as background scenery
eyelet, eyehole - a small hole (usually round and finished around the edges) in cloth or leather for the passage of a cord or hook or bar
festoon - a curtain of fabric draped and bound at intervals to form graceful curves
frontal - a drapery that covers the front of an altar
furnishing - (usually plural) the instrumentalities (furniture and appliances and other movable accessories including curtains and rugs) that make a home (or other area) livable
portiere - a heavy curtain hung across a doorway
shower curtain - a curtain that keeps water from splashing out of the shower area
theater curtain, theatre curtain - a hanging cloth that conceals the stage from the view of the audience; rises or parts at the beginning and descends or closes between acts and at the end of a performance
8.mantle - a sleeveless garment like a cloak but shortermantle - a sleeveless garment like a cloak but shorter
chlamys - a short mantle or cape fastened at the shoulder; worn by men in ancient Greece
cloak - a loose outer garment
mantelet, mantilla - short cape worn by women
pelisse - a sleeveless cape that is lined or trimmed with fur
tippet - a woman's fur shoulder cape with hanging ends; often consisting of the whole fur of a fox or marten
Verb1.mantle - spread over a surface, like a mantle
diffuse, fan out, spread out, spread - move outward; "The soldiers fanned out"
2.mantle - cover like a mantle; "The ivy mantles the building"
spread over, cover - form a cover over; "The grass covered the grave"

mantle

noun
1. role, job, position, post, responsibility, task, duty, function, capacity, burden, onus She has the intellectual form to take up the mantle of leadership.
2. covering, cover, screen, cloud, curtain, envelope, blanket, veil, shroud, canopy, pall The park looked grim under a mantle of soot and ash.
3. cloak, wrap, cape, hood, shawl flaxen hair that hung round her shoulders like a silken mantle
verb
1. cover, hide, blanket, cloud, wrap, screen, mask, disguise, veil, cloak, shroud, envelop, overspread Many of the peaks were already mantled with snow.

mantle

verb
1. To cover as if with clothes:
2. To become red in the face:
Translations
аба
ErdmantelGlühstrumpfHirnrindeHülleMantel
aardmantelmantel

mantle

[ˈmæntl]
A. N
1. (= layer) → capa f; (= blanket) → manto m
a mantle of snowuna capa de nieve
2. (= gas mantle) → manguito m incandescente, camisa f incandescente
3. (archaic) (= cloak) → manto m
4. he accepted the mantle of leaderasumió el liderazgo, aceptó el cargo de líder
the mantle of responsibilityla plena responsabilidad
B. VT (liter) → cubrir (in de) → envolver (in en)

mantle

[ˈmæntəl] n
(= cloak) → cape f
[snow, vegetation] → manteau mman-to-man [ˌmæntəˈmæn]
adj [talk] → d'homme à homme; [combat] → d'homme à homme
man-to-man marking (SPORT)marquage individuel
adv [talk] → d'homme à homme

mantle

n
Umhang m; (fig)Deckmantel m; a mantle of snoweine Schneedecke
(= gas mantle)Glühstrumpf m
vt (liter)bedecken

mantle

[ˈmæntl] n (old) (garment) → mantello, manto (also gas mantle) → reticella (Geol) → mantello
a mantle of snow → un manto di neve

man·tle

n. manto, capa.
References in classic literature ?
The man in the mantle went and stationed himself on the watch under a porch on the other side of the street.
He looketh afar o'er the waves, Wind-ruffled and deep and green; And the mantle of Autumn lies Over wood and hill and ravine.
On a throne hung with clouds sat the Frost-King; a crown of crystals bound his white locks, and a dark mantle wrought with delicate frost-work was folded over his cold breast.
And his daughter was also shocked, but hoped the king would soon give up such thoughts; so she said to him, 'Before I marry anyone I must have three dresses: one must be of gold, like the sun; another must be of shining silver, like the moon; and a third must be dazzling as the stars: besides this, I want a mantle of a thousand different kinds of fur put together, to which every beast in the kingdom must give a part of his skin.
His mantle and hood were of the best Flanders cloth, and fell in ample, and not ungraceful folds, around a handsome, though somewhat corpulent person.
He wore a red mantle, and stretched his long legs forward in French fashion.
They will look very pretty--Dorothy on one end of the mantle and Ozma on the other--and I shall take great care to see they are not broken when the maids dust them.
One of the night-tunes was playing in the wind, when the door of his room seemed to open to a light touch, and, after a moment's pause, a quiet figure seemed to stand there, with a black mantle on it.
The West Wind reigns over the seas surrounding the coasts of these kingdoms; and from the gateways of the channels, from promontories as if from watch-towers, from estuaries of rivers as if from postern gates, from passage-ways, inlets, straits, firths, the garrison of the Isle and the crews of the ships going and returning look to the westward to judge by the varied splendours of his sunset mantle the mood of that arbitrary ruler.
Still clad as he was in the mantle and wimple of an old woman, Til did not, at first, recognize him, and when he spoke she burst into a nervous, cackling laugh, as one caught in the perpetration of some questionable act, nor did her manner escape the shrewd notice of the wily master of fence.
The men wore the maro, a band one foot in width and several feet in length, swathed round the loins, and formed of tappa, or cloth of bark; the kihei, or mantle, about six feet square, tied in a knot over one shoulder, passed under the opposite arm, so as to leave it bare, and falling in graceful folds before and behind, to the knee, so as to bear some resemblance to a Roman toga.
Long and curious speeches, are as fit for dispatch, as a robe or mantle, with a long train, is for race.