many-one


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many-one

adj
1. (Mathematics) maths logic (of a function) associating a single element of a range with more than one member of the domain
2. (Logic) maths logic (of a function) associating a single element of a range with more than one member of the domain
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In this dialogue, N argues that many-one identity, and thus composition as identity, is conceptually confused.
Typically, we expect it to be a many-one mapping into k-h.
Block writes that there can be a many-one relation between thought contents and meanings, and a many-one relation between meanings and truth conditions.
A language L [subset or equal to] [summation over (term)] * is many-one reducible to a set S [member of] [?
The nonparametric Steel's Many-One Test was employed when the data failed normal distribution or equality of variance assumptions.
Photography seemed to be something quite different, at the beginning; it seemed to prove that there was only one world, not many-one visible world, anyway.
First, while an assignment fixes a corresponding specification, the set of sentences true on that assignment, the reverse does not hold: there is no such thing as the assignment corresponding to a given specification; assignments (roughly, "models") and specifications ("theories") are related many-one.
The many-many relationship will be divided into two separable components: the one-many relation of "compositional plasticity" or "multiple realization" whereby a given higher-level property can be realized by any number of distinct lower-level state types (Putnam, 1960, 1967; Fodor, 1974; Boyd, 1980); and the converse many-one relation of "context sensitivity" or "multiple realization complement" whereby a given lower-level property can serve to realize any number of distinct higher-level state types (Richardson, 1979, pp.
The mapping from solution space to commodity space is many-one because the former contains multiple activities for producing the same good, while the latter represents each good only once.
A process will denote a many-one relation on the signals that it controls, but will denote a many-many relation over at least its external signals.
If such a theory had been available to Locke, given the many-one correspondence from world to perceived colour, it would likely have reinforced his claim that colours, as nonrelational properties, are not in the world but in us.
Whilst the reasons for this increase are not entirely clear-and no doubt there are many-one is certainly poor practice due to insufficient technical expertise or because technical advice is not followed.