map turtle

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map turtle

n.
Any of several freshwater turtles of the genus Graptemys of eastern North America, having a ridged carapace and usually yellow-striped skin.

[From the maplike markings on their carapaces .]
References in periodicals archive ?
In South Dakota (SD) false map turtles (FMT; Graptemys pseudogeographica) are most commonly found in the southeastern portion within the Missouri River and, on a larger scale, reside along the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers throughout the United States (Lindeman, 2013; Dieter et al, 2014).
Because map turtles have a specialized invertebrate diet, they are not easily sampled by baited hoop traps, as is done for most other emydid turtles.
The Map Turtle and Sawback Atlas: Ecology, Evolution, Distribution, and Conservation covers the entire biology of a little-known genus and provides turtle scientists and scholarly natural history collections with a fine guide to the map turtles and sawbacks found around the country.
Lindeman presents this photo-illustrated guide to map turtles and sawbacks of the genus Graptemys.
Habitat partitioning among three sympatric species of map turtles, genus Graptemys.
But these Northern Map turtles, filmed on a lake in Canada, are actually clinging to each other to use the sun's heat to warm their blood.
With the exception of a single red-eared slider inhabiting a canal with northern map turtles, Graptemys geographica, sliders were not found with the other three species counted during the study.
Population estimates from mark and recaptures of three species, basking counts, and hoop net catches indicated that pond sliders were the most abundant species, but northern map turtles were 8 x more abundant than pond sliders in basking trap catches.