march


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March

 (märch)
n.
The third month of the year in the Gregorian calendar. See Table at calendar.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman, from Latin Mārtius (mēnsis), (month) of Mars, from Mārs, Mārt-, Mars.]

march 1

 (märch)
v. marched, march·ing, march·es
v.intr.
1.
a. To walk steadily and rhythmically forward in step with others.
b. To begin to move in such a manner: The troops will march at dawn.
2.
a. To proceed directly and purposefully: marched in and demanded to see the manager.
b. To progress steadily onward; advance: Time marches on.
3. To participate in an organized walk, as for a public cause.
v.tr.
1. To cause to move or otherwise progress in a steady rhythmical manner: march soldiers into battle; marched us off to the dentist.
2. To traverse by progressing steadily and rhythmically: They marched the route in a day.
n.
1. The act of marching, especially:
a. The steady forward movement of a body of troops.
b. A long tiring journey on foot.
2. Steady forward movement or progression: the march of time.
3. A regulated pace: quick march; slow march.
4. The distance covered within a certain period of time by moving or progressing steadily and rhythmically: a week's march away.
5. Music A composition in regularly accented, usually duple meter that is appropriate to accompany marching.
6. An organized walk or procession by a group of people for a specific cause or issue.
Idioms:
on the march
Advancing steadily; progressing: Technology is on the march.
steal a march on
To get ahead of, especially by quiet enterprise.

[Middle English marchen, from Old French marchier, from Frankish *markōn, to mark out; see merg- in Indo-European roots.]

march 2

 (märch)
n.
1. The border or boundary of a country or an area of land; a frontier.
2. A tract of land bordering on two countries and claimed by both.
intr.v. marched, march·ing, march·es
To have a common boundary: England marches with Scotland.

[Middle English, from Old French marche, of Germanic origin; see merg- in Indo-European roots.]

march

(mɑːtʃ)
vb
1. (intr) to walk or proceed with stately or regular steps, usually in a procession or military formation
2. (tr) to make (a person or group) proceed: he marched his army to the town.
3. (tr) to traverse or cover by marching: to march a route.
n
4. the act or an instance of marching
5. a regular stride: a slow march.
6. a long or exhausting walk
7. advance; progression (of time, etc)
8. a distance or route covered by marching
9. (Music, other) a piece of music, usually in four beats to the bar, having a strongly accented rhythm
10. steal a march on to gain an advantage over, esp by a secret or underhand enterprise
[C16: from Old French marchier to tread, probably of Germanic origin; compare Old English mearcian to mark1]
ˈmarcher n

march

(mɑːtʃ)
n
(Human Geography) Also called: marchland a frontier, border, or boundary or the land lying along it, often of disputed ownership
vb
(Human Geography) (intr; often foll by upon or with) to share a common border (with)
[C13: from Old French marche, from Germanic; related to mark1]

March

(mɑːtʃ)
n
the third month of the year, consisting of 31 days
[from Old French, from Latin Martius (month) of Mars]

March

(març)
n
(Placename) the German name for the Morava1

MArch

abbreviation for
(Education) Master of Architecture

march1

(mɑrtʃ)
v.i.
1. to walk with regular and measured tread, esp. in step with others.
2. to proceed in a deliberate manner: marched off to bed.
3. to advance: Time marches on.
4. to take part in an organized march.
v.t.
5. to cause to march.
n.
6. the act or course of marching.
7. the distance covered in a single period of marching.
8. advance; progress: the march of science.
9. a piece of music with a rhythm suited to accompany marching.
10. a procession of people organized as a protest or demonstration.
Idioms:
on the march, advancing; progressing.
[1375–1425; < Old French marchier to tread < Frankish *markōn]

march2

(mɑrtʃ)

n.
1. a tract of land along a border of a country; frontier.
v.i.
2. to touch at the border; border.
[1250–1300; Middle English marche < Anglo-French, Old French < Frankish; see mark1]

March

(mɑrtʃ)

n.
the third month of the year, containing 31 days.
Abbr.: Mar.
[1200–50; Middle English March(e) < Anglo-French marche, Old French marz, mars< Latin Mārtius (mēnsis) (month of) Mars, adj. derivative of Mārs Mars]

march


Past participle: marched
Gerund: marching

Imperative
march
march
Present
I march
you march
he/she/it marches
we march
you march
they march
Preterite
I marched
you marched
he/she/it marched
we marched
you marched
they marched
Present Continuous
I am marching
you are marching
he/she/it is marching
we are marching
you are marching
they are marching
Present Perfect
I have marched
you have marched
he/she/it has marched
we have marched
you have marched
they have marched
Past Continuous
I was marching
you were marching
he/she/it was marching
we were marching
you were marching
they were marching
Past Perfect
I had marched
you had marched
he/she/it had marched
we had marched
you had marched
they had marched
Future
I will march
you will march
he/she/it will march
we will march
you will march
they will march
Future Perfect
I will have marched
you will have marched
he/she/it will have marched
we will have marched
you will have marched
they will have marched
Future Continuous
I will be marching
you will be marching
he/she/it will be marching
we will be marching
you will be marching
they will be marching
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been marching
you have been marching
he/she/it has been marching
we have been marching
you have been marching
they have been marching
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been marching
you will have been marching
he/she/it will have been marching
we will have been marching
you will have been marching
they will have been marching
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been marching
you had been marching
he/she/it had been marching
we had been marching
you had been marching
they had been marching
Conditional
I would march
you would march
he/she/it would march
we would march
you would march
they would march
Past Conditional
I would have marched
you would have marched
he/she/it would have marched
we would have marched
you would have marched
they would have marched

march

A piece of music, usually in duple meter and with a second part known as a trio, suitable for soldiers to march to, or one composed in this style. A notable composer of marches is the American bandmaster John Philip Sousa (1854–1932), who wrote such pieces as “Stars and Stripes Forever.” Marches, particularly in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, have often been adapted for dances.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.march - the month following February and preceding AprilMarch - the month following February and preceding April
Gregorian calendar, New Style calendar - the solar calendar now in general use, introduced by Gregory XIII in 1582 to correct an error in the Julian calendar by suppressing 10 days, making Oct 5 be called Oct 15, and providing that only centenary years divisible by 400 should be leap years; it was adopted by Great Britain and the American colonies in 1752
Annunciation, Annunciation Day, Lady Day, March 25 - a festival commemorating the announcement of the Incarnation by the angel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary; a quarter day in England, Wales, and Ireland
March 2, Texas Independence Day - Texans celebrate the anniversary of Texas' declaration of independence from Mexico in 1836
March 19, Saint Joseph, St Joseph - a Christian holy day
Gregorian calendar month - a month in the Gregorian calendar
mid-March - the middle part of March
2.march - the act of marchingmarch - the act of marching; walking with regular steps (especially in a procession of some kind); "it was a long march"; "we heard the sound of marching"
walk, walking - the act of traveling by foot; "walking is a healthy form of exercise"
countermarch - (military) a march in the reverse direction or back along the same route
goose step - a manner of marching with legs straight and swinging high
lockstep - a manner of marching in file in which each person's leg moves with and behind the corresponding leg of the person ahead; "the prisoner's ankles were so chained together that they could only march in lockstep"
promenade - a march of all the guests at the opening of a formal dance
quick march - marching at quick time
routemarch - a long training march for troops
3.march - a steady advance; "the march of science"; "the march of time"
forward motion, onward motion, advancement, progress, progression, procession, advance - the act of moving forward (as toward a goal)
4.march - a procession of people walking together; "the march went up Fifth Avenue"
procession - the group action of a collection of people or animals or vehicles moving ahead in more or less regular formation; "processions were forbidden"
hunger march - a march of protest or demonstration by the unemployed
5.march - district consisting of the area on either side of a border or boundary of a country or an area; "the Welsh marches between England and Wales"
district, territorial dominion, territory, dominion - a region marked off for administrative or other purposes
6.march - genre of music written for marchingmarch - genre of music written for marching; "Sousa wrote the best marches"
martial music, military march, military music - brisk marching music suitable for troops marching in a military parade
processional march, recessional march - a march to be played for processions
music genre, musical genre, musical style, genre - an expressive style of music
7.march - a degree granted for the successful completion of advanced study of architectureMArch - a degree granted for the successful completion of advanced study of architecture
master's degree - an academic degree higher than a bachelor's degree but lower than a doctor's degree
Verb1.march - march in a procession; "They processed into the dining room"
walk - use one's feet to advance; advance by steps; "Walk, don't run!"; "We walked instead of driving"; "She walks with a slight limp"; "The patient cannot walk yet"; "Walk over to the cabinet"
file - proceed in line; "The students filed into the classroom"
promenade, troop, parade - march in a procession; "the veterans paraded down the street"
goose step - march in a military fashion
countermarch - march back along the same way
debouch, march out - march out (as from a defile) into open ground; "The regiments debouched from the valley"
2.march - force to march; "The Japanese marched their prisoners through Manchuria"
walk - accompany or escort; "I'll walk you to your car"
frogmarch - march a person against his will by any method
3.march - walk fast, with regular or measured stepsmarch - walk fast, with regular or measured steps; walk with a stride; "He marched into the classroom and announced the exam"; "The soldiers marched across the border"
walk - use one's feet to advance; advance by steps; "Walk, don't run!"; "We walked instead of driving"; "She walks with a slight limp"; "The patient cannot walk yet"; "Walk over to the cabinet"
troop - move or march as if in a crowd; "They children trooped into the room"
advance, march on, move on, progress, pass on, go on - move forward, also in the metaphorical sense; "Time marches on"
4.march - march in protest; take part in a demonstration; "Thousands demonstrated against globalization during the meeting of the most powerful economic nations in Seattle"
dissent, protest, resist - express opposition through action or words; "dissent to the laws of the country"
picket - serve as pickets or post pickets; "picket a business to protest the layoffs"
5.march - walk ostentatiously; "She parades her new husband around town"
walk - make walk; "He walks the horse up the mountain"; "Walk the dog twice a day"
6.march - cause to march or go at a marching pace; "They marched the mules into the desert"
walk - make walk; "He walks the horse up the mountain"; "Walk the dog twice a day"
7.march - lie adjacent to another or share a boundary; "Canada adjoins the U.S."; "England marches with Scotland"
adjoin, contact, touch, meet - be in direct physical contact with; make contact; "The two buildings touch"; "Their hands touched"; "The wire must not contact the metal cover"; "The surfaces contact at this point"
neighbor, neighbour - be located near or adjacent to; "Pakistan neighbors India"

march

verb
1. parade, walk, file, pace, stride, tread, tramp, swagger, footslog A Scottish battalion was marching down the street.
2. demonstrate, protest, rally marching for peace and disarmament
3. walk, strut, storm, sweep, stride, stalk, flounce She marched in without even knocking.
noun
1. walk, trek, hike, tramp, slog, yomp (Brit. informal), routemarch After a short march, the column entered the village.
2. demonstration, parade, procession, demo (informal) Organisers expect up to 3000 people to join the march.
3. progress, development, advance, evolution, progression The relentless march of technology
on the march advancing, marching, progressing, proceeding, on the way, under way, en route, afoot, on your way, astir Serbian troops and militia on the march

march 1

verb
1. To walk with long steps, especially in a vigorous manner:
2. To travel about or journey on foot:
3. To go forward, especially toward a conclusion:
noun

march 2

noun
The line or area separating geopolitical units:
Translations
maart
سَيْرٌشَهْر آذارمَارِسمارش: لَحْن عَسْكَريمِشيَه عَسْكَرِيَّه
март
març
březenpochodpochodovatplynoutběh
martsmarchmarcheregangudvikling
marto
markmarssmärts
مارس
maaliskuumarssimarssiarajamaa
मार्च
ožujakmaršmarširati
márciusmenetelés
maret
gangamarsmarseramarséra, ganga í taktmarsering
三月行進行進する
3월삼월행진행진하다
martius
eiti pirmynėjimas pirmynkovasmaršasmarširuoti
martssoļotgaitagājiensmaršēt
martie
pochodpochodovaťmarec
korakatimarecmárecpohodstopati
март
marsmarschmarscheratågtåga
เดินเดือนมีนาคมการเดินขบวน
березень
tháng bacuộc diễu hànhdiễu hành

March

[mɑːtʃ] Nmarzo m
see July for usage

march

1 [mɑːtʃ]
A. N (Mil, Mus) → marcha f (fig) (= long walk) → marcha f, caminata f
forced marchmarcha f forzada
an army on the marchun ejército en marcha
we were on the march to the capitalmarchábamos hacia or sobre la capital
it's a day's march from hereestá a un día de marcha desde aquí (fig) → eso queda lejísimos
see also quick A1
see also steal A1
B. VT
1. [+ soldiers] → hacer marchar, llevar
I was marched into an officeme llevaron a un despacho, me hicieron entrar en un despacho
2. [+ distance] → recorrer (marchando)
C. VI
1. (Mil) → marchar
forward march!de frente ¡ar!
quick march!al trote ¡ar!
to march pastdesfilar
to march past sbdesfilar ante algn
2. (= demonstrate) → manifestarse, hacer una manifestación
3. (fig) to march into a roomentrar resueltamente en un cuarto
to march up to sbabordar a algn
D. CPD march past N (Mil) → desfile m
march in VI + ADVentrar (resueltamente )
march off
A. VT + ADV to march sb offllevarse a algn
B. VI + ADVirse (resueltamente )
march on
A. VI + PREPmarchar sobre
B. VI + ADVseguir marchando
march out VI + ADVsalir (airado, resueltamente )

march

2 [mɑːtʃ] N (Hist) → marca f
the Spanish Marchla Marca Hispánica
the Welsh marchesla marca galesa

March

[ˈmɑːrtʃ]
nmars m
see also July
in March → en mars
modif [birthday, wedding] → de mars

march

[ˈmɑːrtʃ]
vi
[soldier] (on parade)marcher au pas; (on campaign)marcher
A Scottish battalion was marching down the street → Un bataillon écossais marchait au pas dans la rue.
[demonstrators] → défiler
(angrily)
She marched into my office → Elle fit irruption d'un air furieux dans mon bureau.
to march out of the room → quitter la pièce d'un pas furieux
(in a determined way) to march out of the room → quitter la pièce d'un pas énergique, quitter la pièce d'un pas décidé
vt
[+ soldiers] → faire marcher au pas
n
[soldiers] → marche f
(= demonstration) → manifestation f
to go on a march [demonstrator] → participer à une manifestation
to steal a march on sb → prendre un temps d'avance sur qn
the march of progress → la marche du progrès

March

nMärz m ? also September

march

1
n
(Mil, Mus) → Marsch m; (= demonstration)Demonstration f; (fig: = long walk) → Weg m; to move at a good stiff marchmit strammen Schritten or stramm marschieren; we had been five days on the marchwir waren fünf Tage lang marschiert; it’s two days’ marches ist ein Zwei-Tage-Marsch; he went for a good march across the moorser ist durchs Moorland marschiert
(of time, history, events)Lauf m
to steal a march on somebodyjdm zuvorkommen
vt soldiersmarschieren lassen; distancemarschieren; to march somebody offjdn abführen
vimarschieren; forward march!vorwärts(, marsch)!; quick march!im Laufschritt, marsch!; to march ineinmarschieren; she just marched into the roomsie marschierte einfach (ins Zimmer) hinein; time marches ondie Zeit bleibt nicht stehen; to march outabmarschieren, ausrücken; to march past somebodyan jdm vorbeimarschieren; she marched straight up to himsie marschierte schnurstracks auf ihn zu

march

2
n (Hist) → Grenzmark f; the Welsh marchesdas Grenzland zwischen England und Wales

March

[mɑːtʃ] nmarzo
for usage see July

march

[mɑːtʃ]
1. n (gen) → marcia; (demonstration) → marcia, dimostrazione f
on the march → in marcia
a day's march → una giornata di marcia
2. vi (Mil) → marciare
quick march! → avanti, marsc!
to march into a room → entrare a passo deciso in una stanza
to march past → sfilare
to march past sb → sfilare davanti a qn
to march up to sb → andare risolutamente da qn
3. vt (Mil) → far marciare
to march sb off to prison/to bed → spedire qn in prigione/a letto

March

(maːtʃ) noun
the third month of the year, the month following February.

march

(maːtʃ) verb
1. to (cause to) walk at a constant rhythm, and often in step with others. Soldiers were marching along the street.
2. to go on steadily. Time marches on.
noun
1. (the) act of marching. a long march; the march of time.
2. a piece of music for marching to. The band played a march.

march

سَيْرٌ, مَارِس, يَسِيِرُ březen, pochod, pochodovat march, marchere, marts Marsch, marschieren, März βαδίζω, Μάρτιος, οδοιπορία marcha, marchar, marzo maaliskuu, marssi, marssia défiler, marche, mars marš, marširati, ožujak marcia, marciare, marzo 三月, 行進, 行進する 3월, 행진, 행진하다 maart, marcheren, mars mars, marsj, marsjere marsz, marzec, pomaszerować marcha, marchar, março март, марш, маршировать mars, marsch, marschera เดิน, เดือนมีนาคม, การเดินขบวน Mart, uygun adım yürümek, uyun adım yürüyüş cuộc diễu hành, diễu hành, tháng Ba 三月, 前进, 行军

march

n. marcha, progreso;
v. marchar, poner en marcha.
References in classic literature ?
I hate to think I've got to grow up, and be Miss March, and wear long gowns, and look as prim as a China Aster
We went to Columbus in early March and as soon as the days became warm I went to work in the garden.
The neighbours had helped them to build it in March.
A letter also came from her husband, saying he hoped to be back early in March, and then they would get ready for that journey abroad which he had promised her so long, which he felt now fully able to afford; he felt able to travel as people should, without any thought of small economies--thanks to his recent speculations in Wall Street.
There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head.
In our march, there fell out an unlucky accident, which, however, did not prove of the bad consequence it might have done.
If you set a fully equipped army in march in order to snatch an advantage, the chances are that you will be too late.
At this point of its march the division curved away from the field and went winding off in the direction of the river.
Their steady march was like the progress of a machine, that would roll irresistibly over everything in its way.
This done, the men wrapped themselves in their blankets, stretched themselves before the fire, and being fatigued with a long day's march, and gorged with a hearty supper, were soon in a profound sleep.
It was a very short march, and time lacked an hour to sundown, so Kim cast about for means of amusement.
Trades and professions march together with scarcely a more real bond of union.