marchioness


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mar·chio·ness

 (mär′shə-nĭs, mär′shə-nĕs′)
n.
1. The wife or widow of a marquess.
2. A noblewoman ranking above a countess and below a duchess. Also called marquise.
3. Used as a title for such a noblewoman.

[Medieval Latin marchiōnissa, wife of a margrave, marchioness, feminine of marchiō, marchiōn-, marquis, from marca, boundary, of Germanic origin; see merg- in Indo-European roots.]

marchioness

(ˈmɑːʃənɪs; ˌmɑːʃəˈnɛs)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the wife or widow of a marquis
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a woman who holds the rank of marquis
[C16: from Medieval Latin marchionissa, feminine of marchiō marquis]

mar•chion•ess

(ˈmɑr ʃə nɪs, ˌmɑr ʃəˈnɛs)

n.
1. the wife or widow of a marquess.
2. a woman holding a rank equal to that of a marquess.
[1770–80; < Medieval Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.marchioness - the wife or widow of a marquismarchioness - the wife or widow of a marquis  
married woman, wife - a married woman; a man's partner in marriage
2.marchioness - a noblewoman ranking below a duchess and above a countessmarchioness - a noblewoman ranking below a duchess and above a countess
noblewoman, peeress, Lady - a woman of the peerage in Britain
Translations
markiisitar
markiza

marchioness

[ˈmɑːʃənɪs] Nmarquesa f

marchioness

nMarquise f

marchioness

[ˈmɑːʃnɪs] nmarchesa
References in classic literature ?
To make it seem more real and pleasant, I shall call you the Marchioness, do you hear?
The Marchioness, holding her cards very tight in both hands, considered which to play, and Mr Swiveller, assuming the gay and fashionable air which such society required, took another pull at the tankard, and waited for her lead.
The Marchioness of Steyne was of the renowned and ancient family of the Caerlyons, Marquises of Camelot, who have preserved the old faith ever since the conversion of the venerable Druid, their first ancestor, and whose pedigree goes far beyond the date of the arrival of King Brute in these islands.
And do you suppose that that woman, of that family, who are as proud as the Bourbons, and to whom the Steynes are but lackeys, mushrooms of yesterday (for after all, they are not of the Old Gaunts, but of a minor and doubtful branch of the house); do you suppose, I say (the reader must bear in mind that it is always Tom Eaves who speaks) that the Marchioness of Steyne, the haughtiest woman in England, would bend down to her husband so submissively if there were not some cause?
Between the Marchioness and the natural and tender regard of mother for children, there was that cruel barrier placed of difference of faith.
They passed down the room together a few moments later, the Marchioness wonderfully dressed in a gown of strange turquoise blue, looking up at her companion, and talking with somewhat unusual animation.
Thorley Chivers, but who, having received a Papal title, had resumed her first husband's patronymic, and called herself the Marchioness Manson, because in Italy she could turn it into Manzoni) the little girl received an expensive but incoherent education, which included "drawing from the model," a thing never dreamed of before, and playing the piano in quintets with professional musicians.
A MARCHIONESS is alleged to have caused a crash when her 4x4 was sent spinning and hit by a lorry after she had pulled in front of a car.
The last one was, in fact, the Marchioness of Graham, completed in 1936 at Fairfields Shipyards in Govan for the Caledonian Steam Packet Company.
1989: The Thames pleasure cruiser Marchioness was hit by a dredger and 51 young people attending a party on the boat were killed.
Meanwhile, Paul Seligman has "happy memories" of the Marchioness of Bute in the late 1960s and early '70s, when it hosted a folk club.
Elsewhere, this was the year when 96 Liverpool fans died at Hillsborough during an FA Cup match, and the Marchioness pleasure boat disaster on the ames killed 51 people.