marchioness


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mar·chio·ness

 (mär′shə-nĭs, mär′shə-nĕs′)
n.
1. The wife or widow of a marquess.
2. A noblewoman ranking above a countess and below a duchess. Also called marquise.
3. Used as a title for such a noblewoman.

[Medieval Latin marchiōnissa, wife of a margrave, marchioness, feminine of marchiō, marchiōn-, marquis, from marca, boundary, of Germanic origin; see merg- in Indo-European roots.]

marchioness

(ˈmɑːʃənɪs; ˌmɑːʃəˈnɛs)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the wife or widow of a marquis
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a woman who holds the rank of marquis
[C16: from Medieval Latin marchionissa, feminine of marchiō marquis]

mar•chion•ess

(ˈmɑr ʃə nɪs, ˌmɑr ʃəˈnɛs)

n.
1. the wife or widow of a marquess.
2. a woman holding a rank equal to that of a marquess.
[1770–80; < Medieval Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.marchioness - the wife or widow of a marquismarchioness - the wife or widow of a marquis  
married woman, wife - a married woman; a man's partner in marriage
2.marchioness - a noblewoman ranking below a duchess and above a countessmarchioness - a noblewoman ranking below a duchess and above a countess
noblewoman, peeress, Lady - a woman of the peerage in Britain
Translations
markiisitar
markiza

marchioness

[ˈmɑːʃənɪs] Nmarquesa f

marchioness

nMarquise f

marchioness

[ˈmɑːʃnɪs] nmarchesa
References in classic literature ?
If you were a duchess, a marchioness, or a countess, it would be quite a different thing; it would be unpardonable.
The Viscount of Morcerf can only wed a marchioness.
You surprise me, marchioness, for you speak as if you had some motive or interest in putting the question.
Thorley Chivers, but who, having received a Papal title, had resumed her first husband's patronymic, and called herself the Marchioness Manson, because in Italy she could turn it into Manzoni) the little girl received an expensive but incoherent education, which included "drawing from the model," a thing never dreamed of before, and playing the piano in quintets with professional musicians.
They passed down the room together a few moments later, the Marchioness wonderfully dressed in a gown of strange turquoise blue, looking up at her companion, and talking with somewhat unusual animation.
I had moin, and no expince spared, at Madame Flanahan's, at Ilyssus Grove, Booterstown, near Dublin, wid a Marchioness to teach us the true Parisian pronunciation, and a retired Mejor-General of the French service to put us through the exercise.
The Dowager Marchioness of Melrose was one of the few persons whom it had been unnecessary to point out to me.
After alluding airily to the Vehmgericht, aqua tofana, Carbonari, the Marchioness de Brinvilliers, the Darwinian theory, the principles of Malthus, and the Ratcliff Highway murders, the article concluded by admonishing the Government and advocating a closer watch over foreigners in England.
To make it seem more real and pleasant, I shall call you the Marchioness, do you hear?
The Marchioness, holding her cards very tight in both hands, considered which to play, and Mr Swiveller, assuming the gay and fashionable air which such society required, took another pull at the tankard, and waited for her lead.
The 90-ton Marchioness was under the central arch of Southwark Bridge when it was hit in the rear by the 1,474-ton dredger the Bowbelle.
Daniel Doherty, 54, from Marchioness Street in the city, denies charges of possessing an imitation firearm with intent to cause fear of violence and two charges of making threats to kill.