margrave

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mar·grave

 (mär′grāv′)
n.
1. The lord or military governor of a medieval German border province.
2. Used as a hereditary title for certain princes in the Holy Roman Empire.

[Probably Middle Dutch marcgrāve : marc, march, border; see merg- in Indo-European roots + grāve, count (perhaps ultimately from Greek grapheus, scribe; see gerbh- in Indo-European roots).]

mar·gra′vi·al (-grā′vē-əl) adj.

margrave

(ˈmɑːˌɡreɪv)
n
1. (Historical Terms) a German nobleman ranking above a count. Margraves were originally counts appointed to govern frontier provinces, but all had become princes of the Holy Roman Empire by the 12th century
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a German nobleman ranking above a count. Margraves were originally counts appointed to govern frontier provinces, but all had become princes of the Holy Roman Empire by the 12th century
[C16: from Middle Dutch markgrave, literally: count of the march2]

mar•grave

(ˈmɑr greɪv)

n.
1. a hereditary German title equivalent to a British marquis.
2. (originally) a military governor of a German border province.
[1545–55; < Middle Dutch =marke border + grave count]
mar•gra′vi•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.margrave - the military governor of a frontier province in medieval Germanymargrave - the military governor of a frontier province in medieval Germany
military governor - the head of a government established by the military (as in a defeated country)
2.margrave - a German nobleman ranking above a count (corresponding in rank to a British marquess)
Deutschland, FRG, Germany, Federal Republic of Germany - a republic in central Europe; split into East Germany and West Germany after World War II and reunited in 1990
noble, nobleman, Lord - a titled peer of the realm
Translations
markrabě
markgreve
rajakreivi
őrgróf
References in periodicals archive ?
It means rather that truly autonomous bioregions will likely go their own separate ways and end up with quite disparate political systems-some democracies, no doubt, some direct, some representative, some federative, but undoubtedly all kinds of aristocracies, oligarchies, theocracies, principalities, margravates, duchies, and palatinates as well.