marguerite


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Related to marguerite: Marguerite Yourcenar

mar·gue·rite

 (mär′gə-rēt′, -gyə-)
n.
1. Either of two cultivated plants of the composite family, Argyranthemum (or Chrysanthemum) frutescens originally of the Canary Islands, or C. leucanthemum originally of Eurasia, having flower heads with white, pink, or yellow rays. Also called Paris daisy.
2. Any of several similar or related plants having daisylike flowers.

[French, from Old French margarite, daisy, pearl, from Latin margarīta, pearl, from Greek margarītēs; see margarite.]

marguerite

(ˌmɑːɡəˈriːt)
n
1. (Plants) a cultivated garden plant, Chrysanthemum frutescens, whose flower heads have white or pale yellow rays around a yellow disc: family Asteraceae (composites)
2. (Plants) any of various related plants with daisy-like flowers, esp C. leucanthemum
[C19: from French: daisy, pearl, from Latin margarīta, from Greek margaritēs, from margaron]

mar•gue•rite

(ˌmɑr gəˈrit)

n.
1. the European daisy, Bellis perennis.
2. any of several daisylike chrysanthemums, esp. Chrysanthemum frutescens.
[1865–70; < French < Middle French; Old French: pearl; see margarite]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.marguerite - tall leafy-stemmed Eurasian perennial with white flowersmarguerite - tall leafy-stemmed Eurasian perennial with white flowers; widely naturalized; often placed in genus Chrysanthemum
flower - a plant cultivated for its blooms or blossoms
genus Leucanthemum, Leucanthemum - comprises plants often included in the genus Chrysanthemum
2.marguerite - perennial subshrub of the Canary Islands having usually pale yellow daisylike flowersmarguerite - perennial subshrub of the Canary Islands having usually pale yellow daisylike flowers; often included in genus Chrysanthemum
Argyranthemum, genus Argyranthemum - comprises plants often included in the genus Chrysanthemum
subshrub, suffrutex - low-growing woody shrub or perennial with woody base
Translations

marguerite

[ˌmɑːgəˈriːt] N (Bot) → margarita f

marguerite

nMargerite f

marguerite

[ˌmɑːgəˈriːt] nmargherita
References in classic literature ?
I had never heard in the theatre lines that were alive, that presupposed and took for granted, like those which passed between Varville and Marguerite in the brief encounter before her friends entered.
The actress who played Marguerite was even then old-fashioned, though historic.
Through the scene between Marguerite and the elder Duval, Lena wept unceasingly, and I sat helpless to prevent the closing of that chapter of idyllic love, dreading the return of the young man whose ineffable happiness was only to be the measure of his fall.
The heartless world which Marguerite re-entered with Varville had never been so glittering and reckless as on the night when it gathered in Olympe's salon for the fourth act.
I tramped through the puddles and under the showery trees, mourning for Marguerite Gauthier as if she had died only yesterday, sighing with the spirit of 1840, which had sighed so much, and which had reached me only that night, across long years and several languages, through the person of an infirm old actress.
van der Luyden, and rose from her seat just as Marguerite fell into Faust's arms.
The first intimation that Wilson had that the schedule was actually to be put into practical operation was when his employer, one Monday evening, requested him to buy a medium-sized bunch of the best red roses and deliver them personally, with a note, to Miss Marguerite Parker at the stage-door of the Duke of Cornwall's Theatre.
It was barely two days since the last cavalcade of that nature, that of the Flemish ambassadors charged with concluding the marriage between the dauphin and Marguerite of Flanders, had made its entry into Paris, to the great annoyance of M.
Nothing was to be heard but imprecations on the Flemish, the provost of the merchants, the Cardinal de Bourbon, the bailiff of the courts, Madame Marguerite of Austria, the sergeants with their rods, the cold, the heat, the bad weather, the Bishop of Paris, the Pope of the Fools, the pillars, the statues, that closed door, that open window; all to the vast amusement of a band of scholars and lackeys scattered through the mass, who mingled with all this discontent their teasing remarks, and their malicious suggestions, and pricked the general bad temper with a pin, so to speak.
I asked her whether, like Marguerite de Navarre, she had their hearts embalmed and hung at her girdle.
The old man, who was weeding with his hands a bed of dwarf roses and marguerites, was indignant at seeing a horse thus traversing his sanded and nicely-raked walks.
He strode theatrically up to our table and addressing me as "Young Ulysses" proposed I should go outside on the fields of asphalt and help him gather a few marguerites to decorate a truly infernal supper which was being organized across the road at the Maison Doree - upstairs.