marked


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marked

 (märkt)
adj.
1. Having one or more distinguishing marks.
2. Clearly defined and evident; noticeable: a marked increase in temperature. See Synonyms at noticeable.
3. Singled out, especially for a dire fate: a marked man.
4. Linguistics
a. Of or relating to that member of a pair of words or forms that explicitly denotes a particular subset of the meanings denoted by the other member of the pair. For example, of the two words lion and lioness, lion is unmarked for gender (it can denote either a male or female) whereas lioness is marked, since it denotes only females.
b. Explicitly characterized by or having a particular linguistic feature. For example, girls is marked for plural in English, whereas sheep is not.

mark′ed·ly (mär′kĭd-lē) adv.
mark′ed·ness n.

marked

(mɑːkt)
adj
1. obvious, evident, or noticeable
2. singled out, esp for punishment, killing, etc: a marked man.
3. (Linguistics) linguistics distinguished by a specific feature, as in phonology. For example, of the two phonemes /t/ and /d/, the /d/ is marked because it exhibits the feature of voice
markedly adv
ˈmarkedness n

marked

(mɑrkt)

adj.
1. striking; conspicuous: marked success.
2. watched as an object of suspicion or vengeance: a marked man.
3. having a mark or marks: strikingly marked birds.
4. (of a linguistic form)
a. characterized by the presence of a distinctive feature, grammatical marker, or element of meaning not present in a related item: The word drake, which specifies “male,” is marked, in contrast to duck, which does not specify sex.
b. occurring less typically than an alternative form.
[before 1000]
mark′ed•ly, adv.
mark′ed•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.marked - strongly marked; easily noticeable; "walked with a marked limp"; "a pronounced flavor of cinnamon"
noticeable - capable or worthy of being perceived; "noticeable shadows under her eyes"; "noticeable for its vivid historical background"; "a noticeable lack of friendliness"
2.marked - singled out for notice or especially for a dire fatemarked - singled out for notice or especially for a dire fate; "a marked man"
conspicuous - obvious to the eye or mind; "a tower conspicuous at a great distance"; "wore conspicuous neckties"; "made herself conspicuous by her exhibitionistic preening"
3.marked - having or as if having an identifying mark or a mark as specifiedmarked - having or as if having an identifying mark or a mark as specified; often used in combination; "played with marked cards"; "a scar-marked face"; "well-marked roads"
unmarked - not having an identifying mark; "unmarked cards"; "an unmarked police car"

marked

marked

adjective
Readily attracting notice:
Idiom: sticking out like a sore thumb.
Translations
واضِح، مَلْحوظ
zřetelný
klar
huomattavamerkittävä
greinilegur

marked

[mɑːkt] ADJ
1. (= noticeable) [improvement, increase, deterioration, reduction] → marcado, notable; [difference, change] → acusado, marcado; [contrast] → acusado, fuerte; [accent] → marcado, fuerte; [effect] → acusado, notable; [reluctance] → notable, evidente
the difference has become more markedla diferencia se ha vuelto más acusada or marcada, la diferencia se acusa cada vez más
he was a quiet boy, in marked contrast to his raucous brothersera un chico callado, muy diferente a sus escandalosos hermanos
2. (= targeted) to be a marked manser un hombre marcado

marked

[ˈmɑːrkt] adj
(= noticeable) → marqué(e), net(te)
in marked contrast to ... → en contraste frappant avec ...
to be a marked man → être l'homme à abattre

marked

adj
contrastmerklich, deutlich; accentstark, deutlich; improvementspürbar, merklich; in marked contrast (to somebody/something)in scharfem Gegensatz (zu jdm/etw); it is becoming more markedes wird immer deutlicher, es tritt immer deutlicher zutage or zu Tage
he’s a marked maner steht auf der schwarzen Liste
(= signposted) path, trailausgezeichnet

marked

[mɑːkt] adj (accent, contrast, bias) → marcato/a; (improvement, increase) → sensibile, spiccato/a, chiaro/a
he's a marked man → è sotto tiro

mark

(maːk) noun
1. (also Deutsche Mark, ~Deutschmark (ˈdoitʃmaːk) ) the standard unit of German currency before the euro.
2. a point given as a reward for good work etc. She got good marks in the exam.
3. a stain. That spilt coffee has left a mark on the carpet.
4. a sign used as a guide to position etc. There's a mark on the map showing where the church is.
5. a cross or other sign used instead of a signature. He couldn't sign his name, so he made his mark instead.
6. an indication or sign of a particular thing. a mark of respect.
verb
1. to put a mark or stain on, or to become marked or stained. Every pupil's coat must be marked with his name; That coffee has marked the tablecloth; This white material marks easily.
2. to give marks to (a piece of work). I have forty exam-papers to mark tonight.
3. to show; to be a sign of. X marks the spot where the treasure is buried.
4. to note. Mark it down in your notebook.
5. (in football etc) to keep close to (an opponent) so as to prevent his getting the ball. Your job is to mark the centre-forward.
marked adjective
obvious or easily noticeable. There has been a marked improvement in her work.
ˈmarkedly (-kid-) adverb
noticeably. It's markedly easier to do it by this method.
ˈmarker noun
1. a person who marks eg the score at games.
2. something used for marking, eg in scoring, showing the position of something etc. The area is indicated by large green markers.
3. a type of pen, usually with a thick point.
ˈmarksman (ˈmaːks-) plural ˈmarksmen noun
a person who shoots well. The police marksman did not kill the criminal – he wounded him in the leg to prevent him escaping.
ˈmarksmanship noun
a person's skill as a marksman.
leave/make one's mark
to make a permanent or strong impression. The horrors of the war have left their mark on the children.
mark out
1. to mark the boundary of (eg a football pitch) by making lines etc. The pitch was marked out with white lines.
2. to select or choose for some particular purpose etc in the future. He had been marked out for an army career from early childhood.
mark time
to move the feet up and down as if marching, but without going forward. He's only marking time in this job till he gets a better one.
References in classic literature ?
Hannah washed and ironed them for me, and I marked them all myself," said Beth, looking proudly at the somewhat uneven letters which had cost her such labor.
ELIZABETH WILLARD, the mother of George Willard, was tall and gaunt and her face was marked with smallpox scars.
Aside from being caught in a drenching storm and one or two minor accidents, nothing else of moment marked the remainder of the river journey, and at the end of the third day the canoes pulled to shore and a night camp was made.
Beyond the pond, on the slope that climbed to the cornfield, there was, faintly marked in the grass, a great circle where the Indians used to ride.
They had been permitted to sit up till after the ice-cream, which naturally marked the limit of human indulgence.
There was one man, however, who, by his countenance and actions, formed a marked exception to those who composed the latter class of spectators, being neither idle, nor seemingly very ignorant.
My footsteps have often been marked with blood, and therefore I can truly subscribe to its original name.
There is one marked peculiarity about this paper, a thing nobody seems to notice but myself,and that is that it changes as the light changes.
Where the old land surveyor had put down woods, lakes, and rivers, they marked out the cleared spaces, and dotted the villages and towns, and calculated the progressively increasing value of the territory, as if there were yet a prospect of its ultimately forming a princedom for themselves.
In the first place, my coadjutors were not invariably old; there were men among them in their strength and prime, of marked ability and energy, and altogether superior to the sluggish and dependent mode of life on which their evil stars had cast them.
But these fancies were not marked enough not to be thrown off, and it is only in the light, or the gloom, I should rather say, of other and subsequent matters that they now come back to me.
Still more, his very legs were marked, as if a parcel of dark green frogs were running up the trunks of young palms.