marked

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marked

 (märkt)
adj.
1. Having one or more distinguishing marks.
2. Clearly defined and evident; noticeable: a marked increase in temperature. See Synonyms at noticeable.
3. Singled out, especially for a dire fate: a marked man.
4. Linguistics
a. Of or relating to that member of a pair of words or forms that explicitly denotes a particular subset of the meanings denoted by the other member of the pair. For example, of the two words lion and lioness, lion is unmarked for gender (it can denote either a male or female) whereas lioness is marked, since it denotes only females.
b. Explicitly characterized by or having a particular linguistic feature. For example, girls is marked for plural in English, whereas sheep is not.

mark′ed·ly (mär′kĭd-lē) adv.
mark′ed·ness n.

marked

(mɑːkt)
adj
1. obvious, evident, or noticeable
2. singled out, esp for punishment, killing, etc: a marked man.
3. (Linguistics) linguistics distinguished by a specific feature, as in phonology. For example, of the two phonemes /t/ and /d/, the /d/ is marked because it exhibits the feature of voice
markedly adv
ˈmarkedness n

marked

(mɑrkt)

adj.
1. striking; conspicuous: marked success.
2. watched as an object of suspicion or vengeance: a marked man.
3. having a mark or marks: strikingly marked birds.
4. (of a linguistic form)
a. characterized by the presence of a distinctive feature, grammatical marker, or element of meaning not present in a related item: The word drake, which specifies “male,” is marked, in contrast to duck, which does not specify sex.
b. occurring less typically than an alternative form.
[before 1000]
mark′ed•ly, adv.
mark′ed•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.marked - strongly marked; easily noticeable; "walked with a marked limp"; "a pronounced flavor of cinnamon"
noticeable - capable or worthy of being perceived; "noticeable shadows under her eyes"; "noticeable for its vivid historical background"; "a noticeable lack of friendliness"
2.marked - singled out for notice or especially for a dire fatemarked - singled out for notice or especially for a dire fate; "a marked man"
conspicuous - obvious to the eye or mind; "a tower conspicuous at a great distance"; "wore conspicuous neckties"; "made herself conspicuous by her exhibitionistic preening"
3.marked - having or as if having an identifying mark or a mark as specifiedmarked - having or as if having an identifying mark or a mark as specified; often used in combination; "played with marked cards"; "a scar-marked face"; "well-marked roads"
unmarked - not having an identifying mark; "unmarked cards"; "an unmarked police car"

marked

marked

adjective
Readily attracting notice:
Idiom: sticking out like a sore thumb.
Translations
واضِح، مَلْحوظ
zřetelný
klar
huomattavamerkittävä
greinilegur

marked

[mɑːkt] ADJ
1. (= noticeable) [improvement, increase, deterioration, reduction] → marcado, notable; [difference, change] → acusado, marcado; [contrast] → acusado, fuerte; [accent] → marcado, fuerte; [effect] → acusado, notable; [reluctance] → notable, evidente
the difference has become more markedla diferencia se ha vuelto más acusada or marcada, la diferencia se acusa cada vez más
he was a quiet boy, in marked contrast to his raucous brothersera un chico callado, muy diferente a sus escandalosos hermanos
2. (= targeted) to be a marked manser un hombre marcado

marked

[ˈmɑːrkt] adj
(= noticeable) → marqué(e), net(te)
in marked contrast to ... → en contraste frappant avec ...
to be a marked man → être l'homme à abattre

marked

adj
contrastmerklich, deutlich; accentstark, deutlich; improvementspürbar, merklich; in marked contrast (to somebody/something)in scharfem Gegensatz (zu jdm/etw); it is becoming more markedes wird immer deutlicher, es tritt immer deutlicher zutage or zu Tage
he’s a marked maner steht auf der schwarzen Liste
(= signposted) path, trailausgezeichnet

marked

[mɑːkt] adj (accent, contrast, bias) → marcato/a; (improvement, increase) → sensibile, spiccato/a, chiaro/a
he's a marked man → è sotto tiro

mark

(maːk) noun
1. (also Deutsche Mark, ~Deutschmark (ˈdoitʃmaːk) ) the standard unit of German currency before the euro.
2. a point given as a reward for good work etc. She got good marks in the exam.
3. a stain. That spilt coffee has left a mark on the carpet.
4. a sign used as a guide to position etc. There's a mark on the map showing where the church is.
5. a cross or other sign used instead of a signature. He couldn't sign his name, so he made his mark instead.
6. an indication or sign of a particular thing. a mark of respect.
verb
1. to put a mark or stain on, or to become marked or stained. Every pupil's coat must be marked with his name; That coffee has marked the tablecloth; This white material marks easily.
2. to give marks to (a piece of work). I have forty exam-papers to mark tonight.
3. to show; to be a sign of. X marks the spot where the treasure is buried.
4. to note. Mark it down in your notebook.
5. (in football etc) to keep close to (an opponent) so as to prevent his getting the ball. Your job is to mark the centre-forward.
marked adjective
obvious or easily noticeable. There has been a marked improvement in her work.
ˈmarkedly (-kid-) adverb
noticeably. It's markedly easier to do it by this method.
ˈmarker noun
1. a person who marks eg the score at games.
2. something used for marking, eg in scoring, showing the position of something etc. The area is indicated by large green markers.
3. a type of pen, usually with a thick point.
ˈmarksman (ˈmaːks-) plural ˈmarksmen noun
a person who shoots well. The police marksman did not kill the criminal – he wounded him in the leg to prevent him escaping.
ˈmarksmanship noun
a person's skill as a marksman.
leave/make one's mark
to make a permanent or strong impression. The horrors of the war have left their mark on the children.
mark out
1. to mark the boundary of (eg a football pitch) by making lines etc. The pitch was marked out with white lines.
2. to select or choose for some particular purpose etc in the future. He had been marked out for an army career from early childhood.
mark time
to move the feet up and down as if marching, but without going forward. He's only marking time in this job till he gets a better one.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mirka's invocation of a trope reveals the influence of Hatten, the most favorably-received topic theorist in the volume (see his Musical Meaning in Beethoven: Markedness, Correlation, and Interpretation [Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1994]).
The form of the hierarchies makes predictions concerning acquisition, markedness and language change.
In this case, the StP structure is often associated with topicality, but it is not marked for it, since markedness depends on the existence of a structural opposition.
For one, the relative political positions of the native language and English, namely the markedness phenomenon, is an important factor in how the languages are learned or in some cases, not learned.
By the same token as with adjectival heads of NPs, the answer would be some type of conversion, and here it is important to note that, if so, then conversion here overruns the constraint of morphological markedness for a given word-class (cf.
The negotiation of identities in conversation: A theory of markedness and code choice.
Central these is the markedness of the letter or symbol as a porcelain or Plexiglas object or as a graphic mark.
2), setting out a 'time-stability' hypothesis, and Croft (1991; 2001), which is based on markedness theory.
Among the topics are sonority and sonority-based relationships within American English monosyllabic words, whether the sonority sequencing principle is an epiphenomenon, sonority variation in stochastic optimality theory and its implications for markedness hierarchies, sonority and the larynx, the sonority dispersion principle in the acquisition of Hebrew word final codas, and acceleration peaks and sonority in Finnish sign language syllables.
But here it begins to get the fuller comparative and deeper regional treatment it deserves from seasoned field researchers with strong ethnographic and linguistic understanding of the pragmatics of markedness.
Emergent ranking of faithfulness explains markedness and licensing by cue.