market forces


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market forces

pl n
(Economics) the effect of supply and demand on trading within a free market
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.market forces - the interaction of supply and demand that shapes a market economymarket forces - the interaction of supply and demand that shapes a market economy
economic process - any process affecting the production and development and management of material wealth
Translations

market forces

nplforze fpl di mercato
References in periodicals archive ?
com)-- Global Market Forces, a leading data intelligence, marketing and distribution solutions company headquartered in Hong Kong, China is reportedly negotiating the terms of an outsourcing deal that would potentially see it tasked with assuming the outbound direct telemarketing operation for a well-known Asia-based IT services and consultancy group.
Global Banking News-May 24, 2013--China to allow market forces and private sector greater role in economy(C)2013 ENPublishing - http://www.
In some instances, this coal was mined by children as young as 10 (well, that's market forces for you).
Talking to private news channel, she said that prices of commodities depended on market forces of supply and demand.
He suggests that world market forces cannot be controlled, that somehow politicians have no business interfering with the world markets.
The project, called Market Forces, also ties in with Architecture Week, and Talking Birds has set up its own stall for the month.
Written by Clifford Winston (senior fellow in Economic Studies, Brookings Institution), Government Failure Versus Market Failure: Microeconomics Policy Research and Government Peformance examines three decades of empirical evidence in search of the answers to a critical question: When should government intervene in market activity, and when is it better to allow market forces to operate without interference?
The distrust in industrial restructuring through market forces is based on the conviction that nationality of company ownership matters, and that governments become stakeholders when self-appointed "national champions" are affected or when a major corporate reorganization results in layoffs.
We would have to ignore the facts to claim that offshore outsourcing is simply the result of market forces.
FOR many people, market forces are like a dangerous wild animal that needs to be kept in chains or caged in order to protect everybody from harm.
Instead, these variations "reflect the different national policies interacting with social changes and market forces," such as a shift in government spending, whereby "in some countries, the net result of current policies may be to support early retirement over investing in children," and even though many countries increased social spending, it was mainly targeted towards pensions and health care.
Washburn's investigative journalism is a slap in the face to many high-ranking institutions that, she claims, have willingly allowed market forces to manipulate research, and unfortunately, the integrity of IHEs.