marksman


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

marks·man

 (märks′mən)
n.
1. A man skilled in shooting at a target.
2.
a. A classification in the US Army and Marine Corps for the lowest of three ratings of rifle proficiency.
b. One who holds this rating.

marks′man·ship′ n.

marksman

(ˈmɑːksmən)
n, pl -men
1. (Shooting) a person skilled in shooting
2. (Military) a serviceman selected for his skill in shooting, esp for a minor engagement
3. (Military) a qualification awarded in certain armed services for skill in shooting
ˈmarksmanˌship n
ˈmarksˌwoman fem n

marks•man

(ˈmɑrks mən)

n., pl. -men.
a person who demonstrates skill in shooting at an object or target; a person who shoots well.
[1650–60]
marks′man•ship`, n.
usage: See -man.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.marksman - someone skilled in shootingmarksman - someone skilled in shooting    
deadeye - a dead shot
franc-tireur - a sharpshooter (in the French army)
rifleman - someone skilled in the use of a rifle
shooter, shot - a person who shoots (usually with respect to their ability to shoot); "he is a crack shot"; "a poor shooter"
sniper - a marksman who shoots at people from a concealed place

marksman

markswoman
noun sharpshooter, good shot, crack shot (informal), dead shot (informal), deadeye (informal, chiefly U.S.) He was hit in the arm when police marksmen opened fire.
Translations
رامٍ
střelec
skarpskytte
skytta
keskin nişancı

marksman

[ˈmɑːksmən] N (marksmen (pl)) → tirador m

marksman

[ˈmɑːrksmən] ntireur m d'élite

marksman

n pl <-men> → Schütze m; (police etc) → Scharfschütze m

marksman

[ˈmɑːksmən] n (-men (pl)) → tiratore m scelto

mark

(maːk) noun
1. (also Deutsche Mark, ~Deutschmark (ˈdoitʃmaːk) ) the standard unit of German currency before the euro.
2. a point given as a reward for good work etc. She got good marks in the exam.
3. a stain. That spilt coffee has left a mark on the carpet.
4. a sign used as a guide to position etc. There's a mark on the map showing where the church is.
5. a cross or other sign used instead of a signature. He couldn't sign his name, so he made his mark instead.
6. an indication or sign of a particular thing. a mark of respect.
verb
1. to put a mark or stain on, or to become marked or stained. Every pupil's coat must be marked with his name; That coffee has marked the tablecloth; This white material marks easily.
2. to give marks to (a piece of work). I have forty exam-papers to mark tonight.
3. to show; to be a sign of. X marks the spot where the treasure is buried.
4. to note. Mark it down in your notebook.
5. (in football etc) to keep close to (an opponent) so as to prevent his getting the ball. Your job is to mark the centre-forward.
marked adjective
obvious or easily noticeable. There has been a marked improvement in her work.
ˈmarkedly (-kid-) adverb
noticeably. It's markedly easier to do it by this method.
ˈmarker noun
1. a person who marks eg the score at games.
2. something used for marking, eg in scoring, showing the position of something etc. The area is indicated by large green markers.
3. a type of pen, usually with a thick point.
ˈmarksman (ˈmaːks-) plural ˈmarksmen noun
a person who shoots well. The police marksman did not kill the criminal – he wounded him in the leg to prevent him escaping.
ˈmarksmanship noun
a person's skill as a marksman.
leave/make one's mark
to make a permanent or strong impression. The horrors of the war have left their mark on the children.
mark out
1. to mark the boundary of (eg a football pitch) by making lines etc. The pitch was marked out with white lines.
2. to select or choose for some particular purpose etc in the future. He had been marked out for an army career from early childhood.
mark time
to move the feet up and down as if marching, but without going forward. He's only marking time in this job till he gets a better one.
References in classic literature ?
The Frenchman was too experienced a marksman not to know that he had scored a hit.
I am disappointed that monsieur is not so wonderful a marksman as I had been led to believe.
Magua affected to consider the expedient, which he well knew proceeded from distrust of himself, as a compliment, and made a gesture of acquiescence, well content that his veracity should be supported by so skillful a marksman as the scout.
But, instead of manifesting an intention to contend with the successful marksman, he stood leaning on his rifle for more than a minute, like a man who was completely buried in thought.
These cries, which were intended as much to distract the attention of the marksman as for anything else, were fruitless.
There was a day when, from Trent to Tweed, there was no better marksman than Robin Heathcot.
At this the marksman seized his gun, took aim, and fired in the direction of the world's end, in order to awaken the sluggard.
With such a weapon a marksman would find no difficulty in lodging a bullet in the eye of a chamois at the distance of two thousand paces.
For in those days the skill of each celebrated marksman was as well known for many miles round him, as the qualities of a horse trained at Newmarket are familiar to those who frequent that well-known meeting.
Having reached the summit of a rock, he saw, a thousand feet beneath him, his companions, whom Jacopo had rejoined, and who were all busy preparing the repast which Edmond's skill as a marksman had augmented with a capital dish.
But the first was too good a marksman to miss his aim; for as the savages kept near one another, a little behind in a line, he fired, and hit two of them directly; the foremost was killed outright, being shot in the head; the second, which was the runaway Indian, was shot through the body, and fell, but was not quite dead; and the third had a little scratch in the shoulder, perhaps by the same ball that went through the body of the second; and being dreadfully frightened, though not so much hurt, sat down upon the ground, screaming and yelling in a hideous manner.
The place was all overgrown with woods and thickets, so closely matted and entangled that it was impossible to see ten paces ahead, and the three associates in peril had to crawl along, one after another, making their way by putting the branches and vines aside; but doing it with caution, lest they should attract the eye of some lurking marksman.