marmalade


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mar·ma·lade

 (mär′mə-lād′)
n.
A clear, jellylike preserve made from the pulp and rind of fruits, especially citrus fruits.

[French marmelade, from Portuguese marmelada, from marmelo, quince, alteration of Latin melimēlum, a kind of sweet apple, from Greek melimēlon : meli, honey; see melit- in Indo-European roots + mēlon, apple.]

marmalade

(ˈmɑːməˌleɪd)
n
(Cookery) a preserve made by boiling the pulp and rind of citrus fruits, esp oranges, with sugar
adj
(Colours) (of cats) streaked orange or yellow and brown
[C16: via French from Portuguese marmelada, from marmelo quince, from Latin, from Greek melimēlon, from meli honey + mēlon apple]

mar•ma•lade

(ˈmɑr məˌleɪd, ˌmɑr məˈleɪd)

n.
a jellylike preserve containing small pieces of citrus fruit and rind, as of oranges.
[1515–25; < Portuguese marmelada quince jam, derivative of marmelo quince < Latin melimēlum a kind of apple < Greek melímēlon; see -ade1]

marmalade

jamjelly
1. 'marmalade'

Marmalade is a sweet food made from oranges, lemons, limes, or grapefruit. In Britain, people spread it on bread or toast and eat it as part of their breakfast.

I love toast with orange marmalade.
2. 'jam' and 'jelly'

In English marmalade refers only to a food made from oranges, lemons, limes, or grapefruit. Don't use it to refer to a similar food made from other fruits, for example blackberries, strawberries, or apricots. A food like this is called jam in British English, and jam or jelly in American English.

I bought a jar of raspberry jam.
She made us jelly sandwiches.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.marmalade - a preserve made of the pulp and rind of citrus fruitsmarmalade - a preserve made of the pulp and rind of citrus fruits
conserve, conserves, preserves, preserve - fruit preserved by cooking with sugar
orange marmalade - marmalade made from oranges
Translations
مُرَبَىمَرْملاد: مُرَبّى قطع الفاكِهَه وقُشورها
marmeládacitrusová zavařenina
marmeladeorangemarmelade
marmeladi
pekmez
dzsemgyümölcsízízlekvárnarancsdzsem
marmelaîi, ávaxtamauk
マーマレード
마멀레이드
marmeladas
ievārījums
marmelada
marmelad
แยมส้ม
mứt cam

marmalade

[ˈmɑːməleɪd]
A. Nmermelada f (de naranja amarga or limón)
B. CPD marmalade orange Nnaranja f amarga

marmalade

[ˈmɑːrməleɪd] nmarmelade f d'oranges

marmalade

nMarmelade faus Zitrusfrüchten; (orange) marmaladeOrangenmarmelade f

marmalade

[ˈmɑːməˌleɪd] nmarmellata d'arance

marmalade

(ˈmaːməleid) noun
a type of jam made from oranges, lemons or grapefruit.

marmalade

مُرَبَى marmeláda marmelade Orangenmarmelade μαρμελάδα mermelada marmeladi marmelade pekmez marmellata di agrumi マーマレード 마멀레이드 marmelade marmelade marmolada marmelada конфитюр marmelad แยมส้ม marmelat mứt cam 果酱

marmalade

n. mermelada, conserva de frutas.
References in classic literature ?
Ribby put on her shawl and bonnet and went out again with a basket, to the village shop to buy a packet of tea, a pound of lump sugar, and a pot of marmalade.
And marmalade," said Sir Joseph, striking in at the first opportunity.
Sedley that a muffin and a quantity of orange marmalade spread out in a little cut-glass saucer would be peculiarly agreeable refreshments to Amelia in her most interesting situation.
I remember eating muffins at the time, with marmalade.
He's such a nut with the telephones," the man by his side explained, helping himself to marmalade.
Butteridge's conception of an adequate equipment for a balloon ascent: a hamper which included a game pie, a Roman pie, a cold fowl, tomatoes, lettuce, ham sandwiches, shrimp sandwiches, a large cake, knives and forks and paper plates, self-heating tins of coffee and cocoa, bread, butter, and marmalade, several carefully packed bottles of champagne, bottles of Perrier water, and a big jar of water for washing, a portfolio, maps, and a compass, a rucksack containing a number of conveniences, including curling-tongs and hair-pins,, a cap with ear-flaps, and so forth.
He entered that apartment, and found two gentlemen sitting face to face at a large and easy desk, one of whom was polishing a gun-barrel on his pocket-handkerchief, while the other was spreading marmalade on bread with a paper-knife.
She still screamed and sobbed lustily, kicked her two brothers for offering to touch her, and all their united soothings were ineffectual till Lady Middleton luckily remembering that in a scene of similar distress last week, some apricot marmalade had been successfully applied for a bruised temple, the same remedy was eagerly proposed for this unfortunate scratch, and a slight intermission of screams in the young lady on hearing it, gave them reason to hope that it would not be rejected.
To my delight she never once looked toward the beach, and I maintained the banter with such success all unconsciously she sipped coffee from the china cup, ate fried evaporated potatoes, and spread marmalade on her biscuit.
In short, she is an angel; and I am Try some of that marmalade, Mr.
Portions of marmalade had likewise been distributed on a service of plates constructed of curlpaper; and cowslip wine had been quaffed from the small squat measuring glass in which little Rickitts (a junior of weakly constitution) took her steel drops daily.
Mary drank some tea and ate a little toast and some marmalade.