marshal


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Related to marshal: air marshal

mar·shal

 (mär′shəl)
n.
1.
a. A military officer of the highest rank in some countries.
b. A field marshal.
2.
a. An officer of the courts of the United States who performs various duties such as protecting judges, transporting prisoners, and apprehending fugitives.
b. A public official who performs various duties for the courts of a city, such as enforcing orders for money judgments or evictions.
3. The head of a police or fire department in the United States.
4. A person in charge of a parade or ceremony.
5. A high official in a royal court, especially one aiding the sovereign in military affairs.
v. mar·shaled, mar·shal·ing, mar·shals also mar·shalled or mar·shal·ling
v.tr.
1. To arrange or place (troops, for example) in line for a parade, maneuver, or review.
2. To arrange, place, or set in methodical order: marshal facts in preparation for an exam. See Synonyms at arrange.
3. To enlist and organize: trying to marshal public support.
4. To guide ceremoniously; conduct or usher.
v.intr.
1. To take up positions in a military formation.
2. To take form or order: facts marshaling as research progressed.

[Middle English, from Old French mareschal, of Germanic origin; see marko- in Indo-European roots.]

mar′shal·cy, mar′shal·ship′ n.
Word History: The Germanic ancestor of Modern English marshal is a compound made up of *marhaz, "horse" (related to the source of our word mare), and *skalkaz, "servant," meaning as a whole literally "horse servant," hence "groom." The Frankish descendant of this Germanic word, *marahskalk, came to designate a high royal official and also a high military commander—not surprising given the importance of cavalry in medieval warfare. Along with many other Frankish words, *marahskalk was borrowed into Old French as mareschal in the early Middle Ages, when much of northern France was ruled by Frankish dynasties. Later, when the Normans established a French-speaking official class in England in the 11th century, the Old French term mareschal came with them. In the first known uses of the word in documents written in England, marshal was used with the meaning "farrier." (It was also recorded as a surname, and in the spelling Marshall, it still survives as such.) The word marshal eventually began to be used in a wider variety of meanings in Middle English, as it had been in Old French, and the term was applied in Middle English to high-ranking officers of the royal court and the courts of law.

marshal

(ˈmɑːʃəl)
n
1. (Military) (in some armies and air forces) an officer of the highest rank
2. (Professions) (in England) an officer, usually a junior barrister, who accompanies a judge on circuit and performs miscellaneous secretarial duties
3. (Law) (in England) an officer, usually a junior barrister, who accompanies a judge on circuit and performs miscellaneous secretarial duties
4. (Professions) (in the US)
a. a Federal court officer assigned to a judicial district whose functions are similar to those of a sheriff
b. (in some states) the chief police or fire officer
5. (Law) (in the US)
a. a Federal court officer assigned to a judicial district whose functions are similar to those of a sheriff
b. (in some states) the chief police or fire officer
6. an officer who organizes or conducts ceremonies, parades, etc
7. (Historical Terms) Also called: knight marshal (formerly in England) an officer of the royal family or court, esp one in charge of protocol
8. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) Also called: knight marshal (formerly in England) an officer of the royal family or court, esp one in charge of protocol
9. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) an obsolete word for ostler
10. (Professions) an obsolete word for ostler
vb (tr) , -shals, -shalling or -shalled, -shals, -shaling or -shaled
11. to arrange in order: to marshal the facts.
12. (Military) to assemble and organize (troops, vehicles, etc) prior to onward movement
13. (Banking & Finance) to arrange (assets, mortgages, etc) in order of priority
14. to guide or lead, esp in a ceremonious way
15. (Heraldry) to combine (two or more coats of arms) on one shield
[C13: from Old French mareschal; related to Old High German marahscalc groom, from marah horse + scalc servant]
ˈmarshalcy, ˈmarshalˌship n
ˈmarshaller, ˈmarshaler n

mar•shal

(ˈmɑr ʃəl)

n., v. -shaled, -shal•ing (esp. Brit.) -shalled, -shal•ling. n.
1. an administrative officer of a U.S. judicial district with duties similar to those of a sheriff.
2. the chief of a police or fire department.
3. a police officer.
4. an official who leads special ceremonies, as a parade.
5. an army officer of the highest rank, as in France. Compare field marshal.
6. a high officer of a royal household or court.
v.t.
7. to arrange in proper or effective order: to marshal facts.
8. to array, as for battle.
9. to usher or lead ceremoniously.
[1225–75; Middle English marshal, syncopated variant of mareschal < Old French < Germanic; compare Old High German marahscalh groom =marah horse (see mare1) + scalh servant]
mar′shal•cy, mar′shal•ship`, n.
syn: See gather.

marshal

A bearing, distance, and altitude fix designated by an air operations center, helicopter direction center, or carrier air traffic control center on which the pilot will orientate holding, and from which initial approach will commence during an instrument approach. See also helicopter directions center.

marshal


Past participle: marshalled
Gerund: marshalling

Imperative
marshal
marshal
Present
I marshal
you marshal
he/she/it marshals
we marshal
you marshal
they marshal
Preterite
I marshalled
you marshalled
he/she/it marshalled
we marshalled
you marshalled
they marshalled
Present Continuous
I am marshalling
you are marshalling
he/she/it is marshalling
we are marshalling
you are marshalling
they are marshalling
Present Perfect
I have marshalled
you have marshalled
he/she/it has marshalled
we have marshalled
you have marshalled
they have marshalled
Past Continuous
I was marshalling
you were marshalling
he/she/it was marshalling
we were marshalling
you were marshalling
they were marshalling
Past Perfect
I had marshalled
you had marshalled
he/she/it had marshalled
we had marshalled
you had marshalled
they had marshalled
Future
I will marshal
you will marshal
he/she/it will marshal
we will marshal
you will marshal
they will marshal
Future Perfect
I will have marshalled
you will have marshalled
he/she/it will have marshalled
we will have marshalled
you will have marshalled
they will have marshalled
Future Continuous
I will be marshalling
you will be marshalling
he/she/it will be marshalling
we will be marshalling
you will be marshalling
they will be marshalling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been marshalling
you have been marshalling
he/she/it has been marshalling
we have been marshalling
you have been marshalling
they have been marshalling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been marshalling
you will have been marshalling
he/she/it will have been marshalling
we will have been marshalling
you will have been marshalling
they will have been marshalling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been marshalling
you had been marshalling
he/she/it had been marshalling
we had been marshalling
you had been marshalling
they had been marshalling
Conditional
I would marshal
you would marshal
he/she/it would marshal
we would marshal
you would marshal
they would marshal
Past Conditional
I would have marshalled
you would have marshalled
he/she/it would have marshalled
we would have marshalled
you would have marshalled
they would have marshalled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.marshal - a law officer having duties similar to those of a sheriff in carrying out the judgments of a court of lawmarshal - a law officer having duties similar to those of a sheriff in carrying out the judgments of a court of law
air marshal, sky marshal - a person trained by the government in hijacking and terrorist tactics who (for security reasons) is a passenger aboard an airline flight
law officer, lawman, peace officer - an officer of the law
2.marshal - (in some countries) a military officer of highest rankmarshal - (in some countries) a military officer of highest rank
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
commissioned military officer - a commissioned officer in the Army or Air Force or Marine Corps
field marshal - an officer holding the highest rank in the army
Verb1.marshal - place in proper rank; "marshal the troops"
lay, place, put, set, position, pose - put into a certain place or abstract location; "Put your things here"; "Set the tray down"; "Set the dogs on the scent of the missing children"; "Place emphasis on a certain point"
2.marshal - arrange in logical order; "marshal facts or arguments"
arrange, set up - put into a proper or systematic order; "arrange the books on the shelves in chronological order"
3.marshal - make ready for action or use; "marshal resources"
gather, pull together, collect, garner - assemble or get together; "gather some stones"; "pull your thoughts together"
4.marshal - lead ceremoniously, as in a procession
usher, show - take (someone) to their seats, as in theaters or auditoriums; "The usher showed us to our seats"

marshal

verb
1. conduct, take, lead, guide, steer, escort, shepherd, usher He was marshalling the visitors, showing them where to go.
2. arrange, group, order, collect, gather, line up, organize, assemble, deploy, array, dispose, draw up, muster, align The government marshalled its economic resources.

marshal

verb
1. To assemble, prepare, or put into operation, as for war or a similar emergency:
2. To put into a deliberate order:
Translations
رئيس الشُّرْطَه أو الأطفائِيَّهمارْشال، مُشير: رُتبَه عَسْكرِيَّهموظَّف في المحاكم الأمريكيَّهيَقوديُنَظِّم، يُرَتِّب
ceremoniářuspořádatuvéstvelitel hasičůvelitel policie
bringe i ordenføreledeofficialordensmarskal
bírósági tisztviselõmarsall
lögreglustjóri; slökkviliîsstjóriréttaròjónnskipa, fylkjaskipuleggjaveislustjóri
ceremonimeistrasgaisrininkų skyriaus viršininkasiškilmingai įvestiiškilmingai palydėtipolicijos skyriaus viršininkas
ceremonijmeistarsievestsakārtottiesas ierēdnistiesu izpildītājs
úradník s vysokou právomocouusporiadať siveliteľ hasičovveliteľ polície
düzenlemekmahkeme icra memurupolis/itfaiye müdürüprotokol görevlisiteşrifatçı

marshal

[ˈmɑːʃəl]
A. N
1. (Mil) → mariscal m
2. (at demonstration, meeting) → oficial m
3. (US) → alguacil m, oficial m de justicia
B. VT
1. [+ soldiers, procession] → formar
2. [+ facts etc] → ordenar; [+ evidence] → presentar

marshal

[ˈmɑːrʃəl]
n
(at sports event)commissaire mf de course
(US) (fire, police)capitaine m
(for demonstration, meeting)membre m du service d'ordre
(military)maréchal m
vt
[+ people] → rassembler
[+ resources, support] → rassemblermarshalling yard ngare f de triage

marshal

n (Mil, of royal household) → Marschall m; (at sports meeting etc) → Platzwärter(in) m(f); (at demo etc) → Ordner(in) m(f); (US) → Bezirkspolizeichef(in) m(f)
vt facts, argumentsordnen; soldiersantreten lassen; (= lead)geleiten, führen

marshal

[ˈmɑːʃl]
1. n (Mil) → maresciallo; (for demonstration, meeting) → membro del servizio d'ordine (Am) (also fire marshal) → capo (000) (also police marshal) → capitano
2. vt (soldiers, procession) → schierare, adunare (fig) (facts) → ordinare

marshal

(ˈmaːʃəl) noun
1. an official who arranges ceremonies, processions etc.
2. (American) an official with certain duties in the lawcourts.
3. (American) the head of a police or fire department.
verbpast tense, past participle ˈmarshalled , (American) ˈmarshaled
1. to arrange (forces, facts, arguments etc) in order. Give me a minute to marshal my thoughts.
2. to lead or show the way to. We marshalled the whole group into a large room.
References in classic literature ?
But for the influence of her husband and the respect he inspired in people's minds she would have been arrested more than once by the town marshal.
It is reported all over town that Judge Pyncheon, who owns the house, has been murdered; and the city marshal is going to look into the matter.
Far and deep in its own region, busying itself, with preternatural activity, to marshal a procession of stately thoughts that were soon to issue thence; and so he saw nothing, heard nothing, knew nothing of what was around him; but the spiritual element took up the feeble frame and carried it along, unconscious of the burden, and converting it to spirit like itself.
Will they forge you the sword of your deliverance, will they marshal you the army and lead it to the fray?
These princes of the blood should range in rank from Lieutenant-General up to Field Marshal, and be gorgeously salaried and equipped and fed by the state.
It was a large garden, only half cultivated, with bushes, as big as summer-houses, of Marshal Niel roses, lime and orange trees, clumps of bamboos, and thickets of high grass.
Nor could it have been the large and small States only, which would marshal themselves in opposition to each other on various points.
I do not know, sir; it was to fulfil the last instructions of Captain Leclere, who, when dying, gave me a packet for Marshal Bertrand.
Thus, fresh from scenes where many of his usual machines of re- flection had been idle, from where he had pro- ceeded sheeplike, he struggled to marshal all his acts.
All of us have our places, and are to move onward under the direction of the Chief Marshal.
The reader knows the manner of death of Robert de Clermont, Marshal of France, and of Jean de Châlons, Marshal of Champagne; and yet the question was only of a certain Perrin Marc, the clerk of a money-changer, a miserable assassin; but the two marshals had broken the doors of St.
Why didn't you capture one, just one, marshal for us?